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Cablegate: Japanese Morning Press Highlights 10/27/09

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DE RUEHKO #2473/01 2992325
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 262325Z OCT 09
FM AMEMBASSY TOKYO
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INFO RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC PRIORITY
RHEHAAA/THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY
RUEAWJA/USDOJ WASHDC PRIORITY
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RHHMUNA/HQ USPACOM HONOLULU HI
RHHMHBA/COMPACFLT PEARL HARBOR HI
RHMFIUU/HQ PACAF HICKAM AFB HI//CC/PA//
RHMFIUU/USFJ //J5/JO21//
RUYNAAC/COMNAVFORJAPAN YOKOSUKA JA
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RUEHUL/AMEMBASSY SEOUL 8225
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UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 08 TOKYO 002473

SIPDIS

DEPT FOR E, P, EB, EAP/J, EAP/P, EAP/PD, PA;
WHITE HOUSE/NSC/NEC; JUSTICE FOR STU CHEMTOB IN ANTI-TRUST DIVISION;
TREASURY/OASIA/IMI/JAPAN; DEPT PASS USTR/PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE;
SECDEF FOR JCS-J-5/JAPAN,
DASD/ISA/EAPR/JAPAN; DEPT PASS ELECTRONICALLY TO USDA
FAS/ITP FOR SCHROETER; PACOM HONOLULU FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY ADVISOR;
CINCPAC FLT/PA/ COMNAVFORJAPAN/PA.

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: OIIP KMDR KPAO PGOV PINR ECON ELAB JA

SUBJECT: JAPANESE MORNING PRESS HIGHLIGHTS 10/27/09

INDEX:


1) Top headlines
2) Editorials
3) Prime Minister's daily schedule (Nikkei)

Special Diet session:
4) SDP dissatisfied at speech's lack of specifics about base issue
(Yomiuri)
5) Main points of prime minister's to the Diet (Sankei)
6) Lawmakers to debate postal privatization, security, and political
contributions; bills narrowed down to 12 (Nikkei)

Futenma saga:
7) Confusion over Futenma makes administration vulnerable to attack
from opposition (Nikkei)
8) Hatoyama vague on Futenma in speech (Yomiuri)
9) Hatoyama fails to explain Futenma relocation to the nation
(Sankei)
10) Okinawa governor strongly desires relocation of Futenma facility
outside of prefecture (Sankei)

Defense & security:
11) Okada confirms Japan will play role in PKO (Yomiuri) 7

Foreign relations:
12) Hatoyama calls for measures against harassment of research
whaling (Nikkei)
13) GOJ hints at extension of sanctions against North Korea
(Yomiuri)

Politics:
14) Opposition parties set to probe prime minister's political fund
raising (Nikkei)

Articles:

1) TOP HEADLINES

Asahi:
Health minister to scrap designated posts at medical association to
improve conditions for doctors who work in hospitals

Mainichi:
U.S. convinced reluctant China to adopt UN Security Council summit
resolution

Yomiuri:
Woman arrested for marriage fraud by Saitama Police on suspicion of
involvement in deaths of two male acquaintances

Nikkei:
Lawson, Mitsubishi Corporation, others aim for Japan's largest joint
point reward program, starting in March next year

Sankei:
Prime Minister Hatoyama delivers his fist policy speech in Diet

Tokyo Shimbun:
New flu: National universities to take special support measures in
second entrance examinations

TOKYO 00002473 002 OF 008

Akahata:
First extraordinary Diet session under new administration kicks off:
Prime minister delivers policy speech

2) EDITORIALS

Asahi:
(1) Prime minister's policy speech: Ideals should be backed by
assurance of implementation
(2) Six-year teacher training system: Improve teacher training
course at post-graduate schools first

Mainichi:
(1) Prime minister's policy address: Show roadmap to materialization
of "fraternity politics"; indicate order of priority for election
pledges

Yomiuri:
(1) Prime minister's policy speech: Ideals alone insufficient
(2) Printed-word culture: Improve children's linguistic ability

Nikkei:
(1) Prime minister's Diet speech is vague, but indicates his
eagerness
(2) Rise in interest rate of government bonds sets off warning

Sankei:
(1) Prime minister's Diet speech: Order of priority for policies not
evident
(2) Retrial of Ashikaga case: Reasons for false charge must be
clarified

Tokyo Shimbun:
(1) Prime minister's policy address: Emphasis given to ideals
(2) Debt repayment moratorium legislation: Views of parties
concerned, such as banks, should be respected

Akahata:
(1) Prime Minister Hatoyama's policy speech: Did it respond to
people's expectations and anxieties?

3) Prime Minister's Official Residence (Kantei)

Prime Minister's schedule, Oct. 26

NIKKEI (Page 2) (Full)
October 27, 2009

08:00 Met at the Prime Minister's Official Residence (Kantei) with
Chief Cabinet Secretary Hirano, deputy chief cabinet secretaries
Matsuno and Matsui. Matsui stayed behind.
10:16 Greeted Dutch Prime Minister Balkenende and posed for photos
with him. Attended a welcome event. Later, met Cabinet Secretariat
Councilor Hirata. Attended an extraordinary Diet session. Foreign
Minister Okada stayed behind.
11:33 Attended a joint plenary meeting of party members of both
Houses of the Diet.
12:02 Attended a Lower House plenary session.
13:00 Attended the opening ceremony of the extraordinary Diet
session at the Upper House Chamber.
14:02 Attended the Lower House plenary session.

TOKYO 00002473 003 OF 008


15:06 Attended an Upper House plenary session.
16:11 Met Hirano at the Kantei. Later met Okada and Vice Foreign
Minister Yabunaka.
18:04 Attended a gathering of new party members at the Hotel New
Otani.
18:41 Met with Balkenende at the Kantei.
19:26 Held a joint press conference. Hosted a dinner party for
Balkenende.
21:26 Met Upper House President Eda.
22:21 Arrived at his private residence.

4) SDP dissatisfied with lack of specifics on Futenma relocation in
PM Hatoyama's policy speech

YOMIURI (Page 4) (Full)
October 27, 2009

While many senior ruling party officials praised Prime Minister
Yukio Hatoyama's policy speech to the Diet for being easy to
understand, some Social Democratic Party (SDP) members expressed
their dissatisfaction.

Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) Secretary General Ichiro Ozawa
lavished praises on the speech at a news conference on Oct. 26,
saying "it was a good, outstanding, and brilliant speech."

However, the speech merely talked about "working seriously" on U.S.
Forces Japan realignment, even though the coalition agreement among
the DPJ, SDP, and People's New Party says that the government will
deal with this issue "in the direction of a review." SDP Secretary
General Yasumasa Shigeno said to reporters: "I got the impression it
was somewhat lacking in specifics and certain portions were
inadequate."

Meanwhile, the opposition parties criticized the speech for its
"abstract contents."

Liberal Democratic Party President Sadakazu Tanigaki commented to
reporters that "there was no clear message on where Japan is
heading." New Komeito leader Natsuo Yamaguchi also pointed out to
reporters that "discourse on how to handle revenue sources for the
child allowances and free high school (tuition) was completely
absent."

Japanese Communist Party Chairman Kazuo Shii said: "He talked about
changing politics repeatedly but did not say how this will be done
in concrete terms."

5) Prime Minister Hatoyama delivers his fist policy speech in Diet

SANKEI (Top Play) (Excerpts)
October 27, 2009

Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama on Oct. 26 delivered his fist policy
address at a plenary session of the Lower House. He noted: "The
viewpoints of socially vulnerable people and minorities must be
respected. That is the starting point of my fraternity politics." He
reiterated his determination to deliver on showcase pledges made for
the August Lower House, including the establishment of a child-care
allowance system and virtually free public high school education.
However, he has given priority to stating ideals and sending
messages, just as the Democratic Party of Japan's (DPJ) manifesto

TOKYO 00002473 004 OF 008


for the Lower House election fell short of proposing specific
policies.

Gist of prime minister's policy address

Q Challenge reform of national politics through a bloodless Heisei
restoration.
Q Materialize politics that will protect the lives and livelihoods
of the people under the philosophy of fraternity.
Q Abolish the style of politics that depends on bureaucrats and
clean up the post-war administration.
Q Pursue close and equal Japan-U.S. relations. Seriously tackle U.S.
Forces Japan realignment taking the burdens Okinawa has borne into
consideration.
Q Apologized for the political fund issue. Pledged full cooperation
for the investigation.
Q Have the Government Revitalization Unit eradicate wasteful
spending of tax revenues and the National Strategy Office lay down
basic guidelines for the management of the economy.
Q Directly support household budgets through the establishment of a
child-care allowance system and free high school education.

6) Debate to kick off at Diet on postal services, security,
political donations; government to submit 12 bills

NIKKEI (Page 2) (Excerpts)
October 27, 2009

Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama delivered his first policy speech at
an extraordinary Diet session, which opened yesterday. The ruling
and opposition parties will engage in a battle of words, starting
with representative interpellations tomorrow. The government and the
ruling camp are giving top priority to the fiscal 2010 budget. They
have set a short period of 36 days up to Nov. 30 for the extra Diet
session. They also have limited the number of government-sponsored
bills to be submitted to the session to 12. The Liberal Democratic
Party and other opposition parties are poised to grill the
government over issues relating to Hatoyama's political donation
reports and the contradiction between the government's decision to
appoint a former bureaucrat for the presidency of Japan Post
Holdings and the Democratic Party of Japan's policy.

Bills the government plans to submit to the extraordinary Diet
session

1. Bill to freeze the sale of shares in Japan Post and other
companies
2. Bill to cope with credit crunch and withdrawal
3. Bill to retain shakai-hoken (social insurance) and kosei-nenkin
(employee annuity) hospitals as public facilities
4. Bill to combat new strains of influenza
5. Bill amending the law on the salaries of general government
employees
6. Bill amending the law on the salaries of special government
employees
7. Bill amending the law on civil servants' childcare leave
8. Bill amending the law on the salaries of court judges
9. Bill amending the law on the salaries of prosecutors
10. Bill amending the law on childcare leave for court judges
11. Bill amending the law on the salaries of Defense Ministry
employees
12. Bill to inspect cargo ships heading to and from North Korea

TOKYO 00002473 005 OF 008

Political and diplomatic timetable

Oct. 28 Representative interpretations
Nov. 12 U.S. President Obama to visit Japan (until the 13th)
Events in commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the Emperor's
enthronement (until the 13th)
Nov. 14 APEC Summit (in Singapore, until the 15th)
Second half Submission by the Government Revitalization Unit of a
report on the results of business classification
Nov. 30 The extraordinary Diet session to end
First half of Dec. The government to adopt its fiscal 2010 tax
reform plan
Dec. 7 The 15th session of the Conference of the Parties to the UN
Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP15, in Copenhagen, until
the 18th)
In late December The fiscal 2010 budget to be determined

7) LDP poised to attack PM Hatoyama for wavering on Futenma
relocation

NIKKEI (Page 3) (Full)
October 27, 2009

The government is in disarray on foreign and security policies, with
Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama seesawing back and forth in his
statements on the relocation of the U.S. forces' Futenma Air Station
(in Ginowan City, Okinawa). The U.S. side is demanding a decision by
the time of President Barack Obama's visit to Japan starting on Nov.
12, but the Japanese side has not decided how to respond. The
opposition Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) is waiting expectantly to
expose the Hatoyama administration's shaky foreign and security
policies through Diet deliberations.

Hatoyama indicated earlier that he would like to spend more time to
arrive at a conclusion after seeing the outcome of the Nago mayoral
election in Okinawa in January, the House of Councillors election
next summer, and the Okinawa gubernatorial race after that. However,
he corrected himself later, saying: "I did not say that the decision
will have to come after the Nago mayoral election."

In reaction to the remarks by Foreign Minister Katsuya Okada and
Defense Minister Toshimi Kitazawa that "a conclusion should be
reached by the end of the year," Hatoyama stated again last weekend
that, "We are in the process of reexamining the options; it will
take some time," stressing that he will make the final decision.
This reflects Hatoyama's wavering between the "consensus" of the
people of Okinawa and the U.S. government's demand for an early
decision.

Any delay in deciding on Futenma's relocation site will also have an
impact on procedures for the relocation of U.S. Marines to Guam
already agreed upon by the two governments. The Prime Minister's
aides are upset because "he has been saying too much."

Okada, who was annoyed by Hatoyama's wavering statements, advised
him: "Mr. Prime Minister, please let us handle this" after the ad
hoc cabinet meeting on Oct. 26. Okada himself has been talking about
merging Futenma with Kadena Air Base, a plan rejected previously by
the U.S. side, which also provides fodder for the opposition's
attack.


TOKYO 00002473 006 OF 008


8) Ambiguous wording on Futenma in Prime Minister's policy speech

YOMIURI (Page 3) (Excerpts)
October 27, 2009

In his policy speech, Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama also referred to
challenges that will be potential sources of trouble for the
administration as a result of drawing fire from the opposition camp.
The Prime Minister and other cabinet ministers' ability to fulfill
their accountability in interpellations and other events during the
current extraordinary Diet session will be tested.

On the realignment of U.S. forces in Japan, he said: "The history of
Japan-U.S. agreements and other circumstances will be carefully
examined, and the feelings of the local people will be properly
taken into consideration." This statement refers to the relocation
of the U.S. Marine Corps' Futenma Air Station (in Ginowan, Okinawa
Prefecture), the biggest bone of contention between Japan and the
United States.

An agreement to form a coalition government with the Social
Democratic Party and the People's New Party said that the
administration will "look in the direction of making a review" of
the realignment of U.S. forces in Japan, including Futenma Air
Station. There is no denying that the expression used in the policy
speech is more ambiguous than the wording in this agreement. This is
probably because a conclusion has not been reached among the Prime
Minister, Foreign Minister Katsuya Okada, and Defense Ministry
Toshimi Kitazawa on the implementation of the Japan-U.S. agreement
to build a replacement facility on the coastal area of Camp Schwab
(in Nago in the prefecture) by 2014. "I laid out how we will review
(the Japan-U.S. agreement) without using the single word 'review,'"
the Prime Minister said to reporters at the Prime Minister's
Official Residence (Kantei) after delivering the speech. But the
policy direction remains unclear.

Meanwhile, Shigeru Ishiba, Policy Research Council chairman of the
major opposition Liberal Democratic Party, gave a lecture in Tokyo
yesterday. In it, Ishiba indicated that (Futenma Air Station) must
be relocated as was agreed upon between Japan and the United States,
saying, "In reality, there is no other option but to relocate it to
Nago."

9) Prime Minister's policy speech is void of explanation to people
on Futenma relocation

SANKEI (Page 3) (Excerpts)
October 27, 2009

In his policy speech, Prime Minister Hatoyama did not specifically
refer to the question of relocating the U.S. Marine Corps' Futenma
Air Station (in Ginowan, Okinawa Prefecture), in defiance of the
U.S. government's call for a settlement before President Barack
Obama visits Japan in November. The Prime Minister voluntarily
robbed himself of a golden opportunity to seek the public's opinion
of the government's plan while the argument on a settlement before
year's end is gaining ground.

The Prime Minister said about the subject of realignment of U.S.
forces in Japan: "I will earnestly address the matter by carefully
examining the history of Japan-U.S. agreement and properly taking
the feelings of the local people into consideration." But he stopped

TOKYO 00002473 007 OF 008


short of referring to the modalities of Futenma Air Station in his
speech.

10) Okinawa governor: "I strongly hope Futenma facility will be
moved out of Okinawa"

SANKEI (Page 5) (Full)
October 27, 2009

Okinawa Governor Hirokazu Nakaima yesterday issued the following
statement on the issue of relocating the U.S. Marine Corps' Futenma
Air Station in Ginowan City, Okinawa Prefecture:

"It is regrettable that the government has yet to present any
specific policy at present. Okinawa Prefecture strongly hopes that
the government will present a plan to move the Futenma facility
outside the prefecture in a realistic and concrete form and turn the
plan into reality."

Nakaima once expressed his willingness to accept the current plan to
relocate Futenma Air Station to the coastal area of Camp Schwab in
Nago City, from the viewpoint of removing the danger of the
facility. Amid repeated changes in remarks by Prime Minister Yukio
Hatoyama and other senior government officials, the governor called
for the Futenma facility to be moved out of the prefecture.

The governor said: "I thought it would be unavoidable" to accept the
relocation of the facility within the prefecture. A senior
prefectural official commented: "The governor actually does not want
the government to push ahead with the plan to relocate the airfield
within the prefecture just because the governor has accepted the
current plan."

11) Okada: Japan to continue its PKO role

YOMIURI (Page 4) (Full)
October 27, 2009

Foreign Minister Okada gave a speech in a meeting held yesterday at
the Foreign Ministry with African ambassadors to Japan for an
exchange of views. Okada, referring to Japan's participation in
United Nations peacekeeping operations (PKO), stated that the
Hatoyama government will play an appropriate role in its efforts to
help (disputed African nations) build peace and stabilize it. This
denotes that Okada is willing to expand the scope of Japan's
contributions through such steps as amending the Law for Cooperation
on United Nations Peacekeeping Operations or the so-called PKO
cooperation law. Okada also stressed that Japan will positively
embark on its activities in African nations, saying Japan will make
even more contributions for a settlement of conflicts in such
countries as the Sudan and Somalia.

12) Prime Minister Hatoyama asks Dutch premier to deal with
antiwhaling activities

NIKKEI (Page 2) (Full)
October 27, 2009

Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama met yesterday evening with Dutch Prime
Minister Jan Peter Balkenende at the Prime Minister's office. During
the meeting, Hatoyama referred to the fact that the Sea Shepherd
Conservation Society, an American antiwhaling organization, has

TOKYO 00002473 008 OF 008


tried to block Japanese research whaling by using a Dutch ship, and
he asked Balkenende to deal appropriately with the matter to ensure
maritime safety. The Dutch prime minister said, "We would like to
crack down on any violations by Dutch ships in a stricter manner."

13) Senior vice foreign minister hints at extension of sanctions on
North Korea

YOMIURI (Page 4) (Full)
October 27, 2009

Yesterday at the first joint policy meeting of the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry,
Senior Vice Foreign Minister Tetsuro Fukuyama said in reference to
the total trade embargo on North Korea, which will expire next
April: "If there is no change in the situation, we will extend it."

14) Opposition parties geared up to thoroughly pursue prime
minister's political funds issue

NIKKEI (Page 2) (Full)
October 27, 2009

The major focus at meetings of the Budget Committees of both
chambers of the Diet will be the prime minister's political funds
issue. Names of the deceased or those who have not donated have been
entered as individual donors in his political funds management
body's political fund reports. The prime minister himself and two of
his secretaries have been charged on suspicion of violating the
Political Funds Control Law. The prime minister contends that his
former secretaries acted on their own discretion.

In a policy speech given on Oct. 26, the prime minister apologized
for this problem and said, "I will fully cooperate with the
investigation so as to rebuild trust in politics." However, he
refrained from giving a detailed account, citing that doing so would
affect the investigation.

Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) President Sadakazu Tanigaki at an
informal meeting of members of the Lower and Upper Houses displayed
a confrontational stance, saying, "We will attack the ruling camp's
Achilles heel in a Diet debate." A senior LDP official on the same
day indicated his intention to call on the government to hold
meetings of the Lower House Budget Committee for five days, taking
the advantage of the prime minister's lengthy policy speech. The aim
is to secure enough time to thoroughly pursue the issue. However,
the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) is hoping to keep it as short as
possible at a one-day meeting.

Commenting on the prime minister's speech, New Komeito leader Natsuo
Yamaguchi said, "Policy directions similar to those the New Komeito
has indicated were seen throughout." Although he did not indicate an
uncompromisingly confrontational stance, he will likely fall in step
with the LDP over the prime minister's political funds donation
issue.

ROOS

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