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Cablegate: Subject: U.N. General Debate Concludes Sept 29:

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UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 04 USUN NEW YORK 000926

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: UNGA ECON PGOV PREL AORC KPKO ER GJ NU NO
ID, DJ, CV, VC, MD, GR, DA, SE, PP, VT, BC, TO, ML, SO
SUBJECT: SUBJECT: U.N. GENERAL DEBATE CONCLUDES SEPT 29:
ERITREA AND DJIBOUTI RIGHT OF REPLY EXCHANGE, CLOSING
REMARKS BY GENERAL ASSEMBLY PRESIDENT TREKI AND OTHERS

1. SUMMARY: The final session of the 64th General Assembly
general debate focused on non-proliferation, climate change,
multilateralism, Security Council reform, the financial
crisis, and sustainable development. Several countries
reflected on the importantance of preventing piracy on the
high seas and ensuring that the situation in Somalia is
stablized. The President of the General Assembly Ali Treki
(Libya) offered final remarks in which he reflected
positively on the role of the United States in the
Palestinian-Israeli peace process. A right of reply at the
close highlighted tensions between Djibouti and Eritrea. The
following countries spoke: Grenada, Nicaragua, Norway,
Indonesia, Djibouti, Cape Verde, St. Vincent and the
Grenadines, Moldova, Greece, Denmark, Seychelles, Papua New
Guinea, the Holy See, Batswana, Togo, and Mali. Full text of
statements available at www.un.org/ga/64/generaldebate; video
archives are at www.un.org/webcast/2009.html. END SUMMARY.

2. GRENADA: Minister of Foreign Affairs Peter David
condemned the United States trade embargo on Cuba and
portrayed the U.S. as responsible for the "failed state" of
the Palestinian Authority. He contended that in both
situations, the actions of the United States "violate the
spirit and letter of international law." He noted
appreciation for President Obama's work on nuclear
disarmament in the Security Council, but reminded the
audience that Grenada's chief concern is small arms trade in
the Caribbean.

3. NICARAGUA: Minister of Foreign Affairs Lopez praised the
leaders from Cuba and Venezuela before criticizing developed
countries for problems ranging from the economic crisis to
climate change. He expressed support for Puerto Rican
independence and called for Israeli withdrawal from Syrian,
Lebanese and Palestinian territories. He declared that the
invasions into Iraq and Afghanistan were unjustified and
decried the "establishment of military bases in Colombia
under the pretext of fighting drug trafficking." He noted
that Fidel Castro referred to these military bases as the
"seven daggers in Latin America" and commented that the
objective of the bases is "to salvage the death-bound
economic and political system with which capitalism flaunts
its power, through hemispheric control of water, oil and
biodiversity."

4. NORWAY: Foreign Affairs Minister Store focused attention
on climate change, stating that "the pace of negotiations
must increase" before the Copenhagen Summit. He called on
developed countries to set economy-wide reductions of
emissions. He reported that Norway would be increasing its
Overseas Development Assistance, particularly in the health
sector. He bemoaned the effects of rape and sexual violence
of women on societies throughout the world.

5. INDONESIA: Minister of Foreign Affairs Wirajuda spoke
about the economic crisis, climate change and food security.
He called for increased regulation and supervision of the
world economy and urged more developing country involvement
in decision-making, and called for deep cuts in emissions.
Wirajuda pointed out that, thanks to investments in
agriculture, Indonesia is a net exporter of rice and is
playing its part to help increase global food security. He
called on Israel to halt the "illegal settlements" and to
work toward a two-state solution.

6. DJIBOUTI: Permanent Representative Olhaye concentrated
his remarks on the Eritrean occupation of Djiboutian
territory. He requested the Security Council to resolve the
situation via resolution 1862 (calling for Eritrea to

USUN NEW Y 00000926 002 OF 004


withdraw its forces). He pointed out the destabilizing
nature of hostilities in Somalia. On the Israel-Palestine
issue, Olhaye called on Israel to stop its "business as
usual" policy of building settlements and its refusal to
address the final status issues. He advocated an African
permanent seat on the Security Council.

7. CAPE VERDE: Permanent Representative Lima condemned the
recent killings in Guinea. He bemoaned organized crime in
West Africa and increasing regional drug-trafficking. On the
financial crisis, he spoke about the effects of declining GDP
growth in his nation, which he attributes to causing a rise
in unemployment and hunger. On climate change, Lima stated
that this is a time for action, echoing similar statements by
other island nations on the effects of rising seas.

8. ST. VINCENT AND THE GRENADINES: Permanent Representative
Camillo Gonsalves agreed with President Obama's assessment
that multilateral unity is "rooted in a discontent with the
status quo." He characterized St. Vincent as being
"globalized, climatized, and stigmatized," having lost its
competitive advantage in bananas and its coral reefs and
beaches succumbing to climate change. He bemoaned his
country's loss of tax haven advantage, which he attributes to
the actions of the G-20 and OECD. Gonsalves called for
Member States to seal the "right" deal at the Summit on
Climate Change in Copenhagen. He urged the United States to
end its embargo on Cuba and suggested that Taiwan ought to be
included in United Nations activities.

9. MOLDOVA: Permanent Representative Alexandru Cujba argued
that a reformed United Nations and expanded Security Council
- specifically the addition of a non-permanent seat for the
Eastern European group - would be better able to react to
peace, security, development, and climate change challenges.
Cujba advocated for non-proliferation and disarmament. He
reported that his country is working on a solution to the
Transnistrian secessionist problem through increased
negotiation and third party mediation.

10. GREECE: Permanent Representative Anastassis Mitsialis
affirmed Greece's support for the Millenium Development
Goals, a comprehensive climate change agreement,
non-proliferation, and expanded human rights. He highlighted
four specific goals: 1) the establishment of neighborly
relations, 2) full integration of South Eastern European
countries into European organizations, 3) deepening of
regional cooperation, and 4) strengthening cultural
interaction and bonds with neighboring states. Mitsialis
criticized Macedonia for its choice of name and Turkey for
interfering in Cyprus, but went on to note that Greece is
"the most sincere supporter of Turkey's accession to the
European Union."

11. DENMARK: Permanent Representative Carsten Staur listed
three main goals for the December 2009 Summit on Climate
Change in Copenhagen: 1) agree on targets for CO2 emission
reduction, 2) agree on a roadmap for achieving these targets,
and 3) develop appropriate policies and measures to reach set
goals. He welcomed United States/Russian Federation
cooperation on disarmament and noted support for
non-proliferation and disarmament. Staur called on Iran and
the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to enter
negotiations and for an immediate halt of their nuclear
programs (as per Security Council mandates). He expressed
the need for a peaceful resolution of the election process in
Afghanistan, democracy in Pakistan, a strengthening of the
Middle East Peace Process, and Security Council reform.


USUN NEW Y 00000926 003 OF 004


12. SEYCHELLES: Seychelles Permanent Representative Ronald
Jumeau focused his speech on piracy and climate change. He
proposed strengthening the rule of law in Somali, ensuring
that piracy is not economically viable, and providing
adequate military deterrence in the region. He likened the
battle against climate change to a battle for survival and
said Copenhagen would only be a success if an agreement
establishes stringent measures for the reduction of
greenhouse gas emissions.

13. HOLY SEE: Permanent Observer Archbishop Celestino
Migliore urged the United Nations to find a "prompt solution"
to the situation in Honduras, but never directly registered
support for the Zelaya government. Migliore urged leaders to
take a firm stand on climate change and emphasized that the
issue, "requires that environmental issues are taken as a
moral imperative and translated into legal rules." He also
pushed for the United Nations to engage in "responsible
development", to fulfill its goal of protection, and to
consider structural reform, including within the Security
Council.

14. BOTSWANA: Permanent Representative Ntwaagae noted the
importance of development and poverty alleviation, but
cautioned the audience not to engage in work that "could
endanger the very lives we want to uplift." He stressed the
importance of combating HIV/AIDS and urged countries to
provide the necessary resources to allow global eradication
efforts to have a maximum impact. He stressed the need for
leaders to hammer out meaningful climate change measures in
Copenhagen. He discussed regional conflicts, emphasizing the
importance of the crisis in Somalia, while commending Burundi
and Uganda for their peace-keeping efforts. Ntwaagae noted
support for the decision of the Southern African Development
Organization to suspend Madagascar's United Nations
membership, and condemned the various coups in Honduras,
Guinea-Bissau, Guinea, and Mauritania.

15. TOGO: Permanent Representative Kodjo Menan asked leaders
to support multilateralism and to strengthen the United
Nations institutions through Security Council reform. He
urged the European Union and the Bretton Woods Institutions
to help Togo's economic recovery. Menan noted Togo's support
for a two-state solution to the Israel-Palestinian conflict.
Menan also discussed his country's tireless efforts to
strengthen the rule of law and bring about constitutional
reform. Menan emphasized the importance of youth,
educational programs, human rights, and development efforts.

16. MALI: Chairman of the Delegation Oumar Daou spoke on the
themes of development and poverty alleviation. He bemoaned
the difficulties that Mali faces as a land-locked country and
urged leaders to "revive global partnerships, to ensure
conditions for poverty reduction, better health care and
education, and gender equality." He stressed the need to
reform financial institutions. Daou praised Libyan President
Gaddafi for his speech and referred to him as a leader
"committed to just causes."

17. PRESIDENT OF THE ASSEMBLY'S CLOSING WORDS: Following the
end of the general debate, President Ali Treki offered a few
closing remarks, inviting leaders to embrace the opportunity
of multilateralism and noting that "I am encouraged by the
efforts of the President of the United States to promote a
just, lasting and comprehensive solution to the conflict in
the Middle East." He called on leaders to support the
critical role of the United Nations in building peace and
security, commenting on the disarmament agenda as central to
its mission. He emphasized the importance of building

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effective development schemes, addressing the financial
crisis, strengthening institutions, and reforming the
Security Council.

18. ERITREA/DJIBOUTI RIGHT OF REPLY EXCHANGE: Delegates from
Eritrea and Djibouti sparred during two right of reply
exchanges. The delegate from Eritrea rebutted earlier claims,
stating that Eritrea had not occupied Djibouti and had no
territorial ambitions there. He also requested a United
Nations fact finding mission into the charge. The delegate
from Djibouti accused Eritrea of inciting regional
hostilities. He said that the "facts speak for themselves"
and stated firmly that "my country has always been convinced
that no nation can disrespect international law." He affirmed
interest in having a dialogue with Eritrea on the issue,
implying that Eritrea has not shown much willingness to do
so. However, he did go on to say that the Eritrean
delegate's language encouraging calm and dialogue might imply
a change of direction.
Wolff

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