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Cablegate: Daily Summary of Japanese Press 11/20/09

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PP RUEHFK RUEHKSO RUEHNAG RUEHNH
DE RUEHKO #2686/01 3240809
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
P 200809Z NOV 09
FM AMEMBASSY TOKYO
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INFO RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC PRIORITY
RHEHAAA/THE WHITE HOUSE WASHINGTON DC PRIORITY
RUEAWJA/USDOJ WASHDC PRIORITY
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RHHMUNA/HQ USPACOM HONOLULU HI
RHHMHBA/COMPACFLT PEARL HARBOR HI
RHMFIUU/HQ PACAF HICKAM AFB HI//CC/PA//
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RUYNAAC/COMNAVFORJAPAN YOKOSUKA JA
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RUEHNH/AMCONSUL NAHA 9871
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RUEHNAG/AMCONSUL NAGOYA 4698
RUEHKSO/AMCONSUL SAPPORO 8030
RUEHBJ/AMEMBASSY BEIJING 1937
RUEHUL/AMEMBASSY SEOUL 8613
RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK 8078

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 06 TOKYO 002686

SIPDIS

DEPT FOR E, P, EB, EAP/J, EAP/P, EAP/PD, PA;
WHITE HOUSE/NSC/NEC; JUSTICE FOR STU CHEMTOB IN ANTI-TRUST DIVISION;
TREASURY/OASIA/IMI/JAPAN; DEPT PASS USTR/PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE;
SECDEF FOR JCS-J-5/JAPAN,
DASD/ISA/EAPR/JAPAN; DEPT PASS ELECTRONICALLY TO USDA
FAS/ITP FOR SCHROETER; PACOM HONOLULU FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY ADVISOR;
CINCPAC FLT/PA/ COMNAVFORJAPAN/PA.

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: OIIP KMDR KPAO PGOV PINR ECON ELAB JA

SUBJECT: DAILY SUMMARY OF JAPANESE PRESS 11/20/09

INDEX:

(1) Interview with Ambassador Roos: Nago is the best Futenma
relocation site; Japan, U.S. to cooperate for Six-Party Talks on
DPRK issues; disagrees with talk of deterioration of alliance (Tokyo
Shimbun)

(2) Editorial: President Obama's tour of Asia - U.S. will be tested
over North Korea's nuclear issue (Mainichi)

(3) Seiron: Reflecting "principle" in foreign, security policies
dangerous (Sankei)

(4) Prosecutors seek three-year prison term for former Chinese
husband for kidnapping and keeping two daughters in China for about
10 years (Yomiuri)

(5) Political Cartoon (Asahi)

ARTICLES:

(1) Interview with Ambassador Roos: Nago is the best Futenma
relocation site; Japan, U.S. to cooperate for Six-Party Talks on
DPRK issues; disagrees with talk of deterioration of alliance

TOKYO SHIMBUN (Page 3) (Full)
November 20, 2009

U.S. Ambassador to Japan John Roos, 54, gave an interview to Tokyo
Shimbun in Nagoya on Nov. 19. He discussed the relocation of the
U.S. forces' Futenma Air Station (in Ginowan City, Okinawa) and said
that "the two governments are aware of the importance of reaching a
conclusion expeditiously," indicating he is confident that the issue
will be settled at an early date. On the abductions (of Japanese
nationals) by North Korea, the Ambassador stated: "The U.S.
government will give support and cooperate in a variety of ways." He
spoke positively about the recent Japan-U.S. summit, regarding this
as a "powerful start toward the deepening of the Japan-U.S.
alliance."

Q: The cabinet-level working group on the Futenma issue has kicked
off but the gap between the two countries remains wide.

Roos: President Obama respects the process taking place in Japan.
The two leaders agreed to reach a conclusion as soon as possible.
The working group was created to support this process.

Q: What if a conclusion is not reached before the end of 2009?

Roos: The U.S. has never set a deadline and has no intention to do
so. The important thing is that the two sides hold close discussions
in good faith to reach a conclusion.

Q: Does the U.S. insist on the coastal area of Camp Schwab (in Nago
City, Okinawa) as the relocation site, in accordance with the
Japan-U.S. agreement of 2006?

Roos: The United States' position is clear. The conclusion that we
reached after a long process of dialogue is the best one. It is a
feasible option.

Q: Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama has announced a total of over 5

TOKYO 00002686 002 OF 006


billion dollars (approximately 450 billion yen) in civilian aid for
Afghanistan as part of the war against terrorism.

Roos: This is very significant not only for the U.S., but also for
the international community, for the sake of global stability and as
solution to the problem. The President has expressed his
appreciation.

Q: On the other hand, the Maritime Self-Defense Force's refueling
mission in the Indian Ocean will be terminated in January.

Roos: This is the Japanese government's decision, and the U.S. is
not in a position to comment on it. The international community has
certainly appreciated the refueling operations so far.

Q: What is the Obama administration's basic stance on North Korea?

Roos: Japan and the U.S. have a close cooperative relationship on
this issue. We will consult closely with Japan to prod the DPRK to
return to the Six-Party Talks. The President made special mention of
the abduction issue in his Tokyo speech. We will give support and
cooperate in a variety of ways for the resolution of this problem.

Q: Next year marks the 50th anniversary of the revision of the
Japan-U.S. security treaty.

Roos: I disagree with the talk of the deterioration of the bilateral
alliance. The alliance relationship remains strong, and it has
contributed to stability in East Asia. As we commemorate its 50th
anniversary, we also need to take up new roles suited to the global
community while maintaining the alliance's fundamental elements.

Nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation and global-warming
countermeasures are some of the areas in which Japan and the U.S.
can work together. True friendship and partnership must be between
equals. I think the recent Japan-U.S. summit was a powerful start in
terms of deepening the alliance.

(2) Editorial: President Obama's tour of Asia - U.S. will be tested
over North Korea's nuclear issue

MAINICHI (Page 5) (Full)
November 20, 2009

U.S. President Barack Obama visited South Korea at the end of a
four-nation tour of Asia that started in Japan, and made an
announcement there that was suitable for that region. Obama said
that the government will dispatch Special Representative for North
Korea Policy Stephen Bosworth to Pyongyang starting on Dec. 8. The
visit will become a major turning point to determine whether the
U.S. will be able to bring North Korea back into the Six-Party Talks
and to resume negotiations toward its denuclearization.

The President's trip to Asia was naturally based on his grand scheme
for Asia policy. He spelled out the scheme in his speech in Tokyo
last week. The speech has been translated into Japanese, Chinese,
South Korean, and Indonesian and made available on the official
website of the White House. This reflects Washington's eagerness to
expand its influence in the Asia-Pacific region.

The President already achieved this aim in Singapore, which he
visited after Japan. The main purpose of his Asia tour was to attend

TOKYO 00002686 003 OF 006


the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) leaders meeting.
Besides that meeting, the U.S. held the first summit with the 10
countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) at
which Washington's policy switch to start talks with the Myanmar
military junta was welcomed.

Indonesian President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono particularly expressed
a feeling of intimacy toward President Obama. Obama expressed his
desire to visit Indonesia, where he spent his boyhood, together with
his family. In response, Yudhoyono said: "You are a friend of
Indonesia."

In China, however, the situation was slightly different. A meeting
for dialogue between the President and students was held in
Shanghai, but many of the questions posed by participants were
convenient to the Chinese government. They were probably selected by
the government. Obama also made a critical comment on the Chinese
government's regulations regarding the use of the Internet, but the
meeting was televised not nationwide but by a local TV station.

Although Obama reportedly referred to the human rights issue during
a meeting with President Hu Jintao in Beijing, since the comment was
not publicized, conservatives in the U.S. have criticized his stance
as more weak-kneed than those taken by former President Bill Clinton
and previous President George Bush when they visited China. It can
be said that the power relationship between the U.S. and China has
shifted.

Obama also said in China: "There are few global issues that can be
settled even without agreement between the U.S. and China." This
view probably is behind his remark in the Tokyo speech: "The U.S.
will not contain China." To be sure, China is a major player in
dealing with such issues as the global economic crisis, global
warming, natural resources, and security. China must be the core of
Washington's new policy toward Asia.

The question is what China should do. First, China should make
contributions to resolving North Korea's nuclear issue. Since China
chairs the Six-Party Talks and also controls the lifeline of North
Korea by providing it with food and energy, it can exert strong
influence over the North. By indirectly supporting Bosworth's visit
to North Korea, China should strongly urge the North to return to
the Six-Party Talks.

(3) Seiron: Reflecting "principle" in foreign, security policies
dangerous

SANKEI (Page 7) (Excerpts)
November 18, 2009

By Toshio Watanabe, president of Takushoku University

Few results produced in Japan-U.S. summit

Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama and U.S. President Barack Obama met on
the evening of Nov. 13, but few results were produced in the
meeting. They issued only joint statements - one pledging to aim at
attaining the goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80
PERCENT by 2050 and another on realizing a world without nuclear
weapons. It is true that these are the most crucial issues for this
century, but both statements include only normal, common proposals.


TOKYO 00002686 004 OF 006


I wonder if it is proper for such (global) issues to be discussed in
a bilateral summit meeting. Even if Japan, which has no nuclear
weapons, calls for a "nuclear-free world," the call is just a "paper
pellet." It is good for the leaders to discuss an outline of the
benchmark for reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. But since
its roadmap has yet to be presented, it is hard for us to believe
the attainability of the goal in 40 years. The prime minister
probably easily agreed on the target out of diplomatic courtesy to
preserve President Obama's honor.

Why did Hatoyama refrain from taking up an imminent issue pending
between Japan and the U.S.? Why has Japan stopped working on its
national security, although ensuring national security is vital for
the nation? The imminent issue I point out is whether to implement
the accord reached between the governments of Japan and the U.S. in
May 2006 to relocate the U.S. Marine Corps' Futenma Air Station to a
coastal area of Camp Schwab in Nago City. Unless the accord is
implemented, other existing plans will never be translated into
action, such as the transfer of U.S. Marines from Okinawa to Guam
and the overall return to Japan of six facilities located in the
southern part of Okinawa's main island.

Disguised agreement

It is necessary for Japan and the U.S. to reduce the burden on
Okinawa while maintaining the current level of military deterrence
in the Far East region. To attain these goals simultaneously and in
a well-balanced way, there should be no other option at the present
time but to implement the 2006 agreement. In the latest Japan-U.S.
summit meeting, the two leaders reportedly agreed to set up a new
ministerial-level bilateral panel and aim at bringing about an early
solution to the base issue. This is an apparently "disguised"
agreement.

Focusing on improvement in the weapon system and geopolitics in the
Asia-Pacific region, the U.S. laid out a U.S. force realignment
strategy for the region, taking sufficient time. It therefore is
inconceivable for the U.S. to accept the conditions that will
inevitably undermine this strategy. Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama
and Foreign Minister Katsuya Okada must be aware of the position of
the U.S., but they supposedly want to save the Democratic Party of
Japan's (DPJ) honor by giving priority to its campaign pledge for
moving a military base out of the prefecture or the nation. It
should not be bad for a political party to try to persist with its
principles.

When it comes to national security, however, it is dangerous for a
political party to try to reflect its principles in its policies.
Responding to the rapidly changing international political
environment in a flexible manner is important. North Korea is
expected to declare in the future about its possession of nuclear
missiles. Someday we may see China complete producing an aircraft
carrier and hold command of the East China Sea.

If the Japan-U.S. alliance does not properly function at such
crucial moments, Japan will inevitably suffer a diplomatic defeat. A
diplomatic approach should be flexible. Only this principle,
"diplomacy is aimed to protect the lives and assets of people,"
should not be changed. Japan must hold firmly to this principle. If
so, the nation should not be upset by such criticism as weak-kneed
or tough, or even as being a renegade or a coward.


TOKYO 00002686 005 OF 006


Measures necessary to have Japan-U.S. alliance function

In the Sino-Japanese War, Japan fought in a friendless isolation.
The U.S., which was the world's largest hegemonic country, is now
Japan's ally. Countries surrounding Japan have taken an aggressive
diplomatic approach and have deployed nuclear weapons or missiles
targeted at Japan. Under such circumstances, it is necessary for
Japan, which has taken a defense-only policy, to make efforts to
solidify the Japan-U.S. alliance.

An alliance must be between one country and another. Japan was
defeated in World War II and consequently was on the brink of ruin.
The original reason for this crisis is the abolishment of the
Japan-Britain alliance. The Japan-Britain alliance contributed to
ensuring Japan's national security during a period of 10 years
before the end of the Meiji Period (1868-1919) and in the Taisho
Period (1912-1926). The U.S., a hegemonic nation, pressed Japan and
Britain to scrap their alliance after the end of World War I, with
the aim of weakening Japan, another hegemonic nation. The U.S.
strategy worked successfully. Instead, Japan concluded an alliance
with Britain, the U.S. and France, but this alliance never
functioned.

Two countries that share common interests conclude an alliance. This
is proved by the fact that Japan's security was perfectly protected
under the Japan-Britain alliance and the Japan-U.S. alliance. The
DPJ government appears to have taken the view that a multinational
security system is superior to a bilateral alliance, as seen from
its advocacy for establishing an East Asian Community. But Japan's
contemporary history teaches us that such an approach is
ineffective.

(4) Prosecutors seek three-year prison term for former Chinese
husband for kidnapping and keeping two daughters in China for about
10 years

YOMIURI Tama Version (Page 35) (Full)
November 18, 2009

It became clear on Nov. 17 that the Akishima Police Station has
arrested Qin Weijie, 55 -- a company employee from China with no
fixed address -- on suspicion of kidnapping his eldest and second
daughters from his former wife for the purpose of transferring them
to another country and other charges. Qin allegedly kept his two
daughters in China for about 10 years after taking them away from
his former wife when they were still in elementary school. A trial
was held on Nov. 17 at the Tachikawa branch of the Tokyo District
Court where prosecutors sought three years in prison for Qin,
maintaining that it was a premeditated act that took place while the
divorce proceedings were underway. The court ended with the defense
team's request for a suspended sentence, claiming that Qin did not
take the daughters away against their will and it was not a vicious
act. The court will hand down its decision on Dec. 3.

According to the indictment and other materials, Qin, who was
planning to take the two daughters to his mother country of China,
approached them near their school in Akishima City on June 8, 1999,
saying, "Can you spend the day with me?" and kidnapped them by car.
He then allegedly flew from Kansai International Airport to China's
Hong Kong International Airport with them. The two daughters were
taken into protective custody when they arrived in Japan to renew
their passports in January this year, and Qin was also arrested this

TOKYO 00002686 006 OF 006


past September when he arrived in Japan.

According to the opening statement and other materials, in order to
escape from Qin's violence, his ex-wife moved out of the house with
their daughters in 1998. That year she filed for divorce with the
Tokyo Family Court's Hachioji branch. In October 1999, the court's
Hachioji branch made a decision to hand over the two daughters to
the ex-wife as their custodian, and the former wife filed a
complaint with the Akishima Police Station in April 2004. In
response to questions at the court, Qin said, "I took them to China
because I thought the children's lives would be unstable (under the
custody of my former wife)," and, "The children said that they were
willing to live in China."

ROOS

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