Celebrating 25 Years of Scoop
Special: Up To 25% Off Scoop Pro Learn More

Search

 

Cablegate: Media Reaction: Climate Change, Afghanistan

VZCZCXRO0256
RR RUEHCN RUEHGH RUEHVC
DE RUEHBJ #3274 3421003
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 081003Z DEC 09
FM AMEMBASSY BEIJING
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 7109
INFO RUEHOO/CHINA POSTS COLLECTIVE
RHMFIUU/CDR USPACOM HONOLULU HI

UNCLAS BEIJING 003274

DEPARTMENT FOR INR/R/MR, EAP/CM, EAP/PA, EAP/PD, C
HQ PACOM FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY ADVISOR (J007)
SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PREL ECON KMDR OPRC CH

SUBJECT: MEDIA REACTION: CLIMATE CHANGE, AFGHANISTAN

--------------------
Editorial Quotes
--------------------

1. CLIMATE CHANGE

a. "Copenhagen to define the post-Kyoto era"

Guangdong 21st Century Publishing Company Ltd.'s business newspaper
21st Century Business Herald (21Shiji Jingji Baodao)(12/08)(pg 1):
"Xie Zhenhua, deputy director of National Development and Reform
Commission, pointed out that the developed countries should be held
accountable for climate change and that the developing countries are
the real victims. Many developed countries proposed to control the
global temperature rise to 2 Celsius degrees, however, according to
the 'United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change,'
developing countries' first and overriding priority is to develop
their economies and eradicate poverty. Many developed countries
have increased rather than decreased their carbon emissions since
the Kyoto Protocol. He Jiankun, director at the Low-Carbon Energy
Laboratory at Qinghua University, said that the double-orbit
negotiations for developing countries to reach both a treaty and a
protocol should not change. At the same time, technology, funding
and a process of adaptation should be given equal importance with
goals of emissions reduction in dealing with climate change.
Perhaps humans are still intoxicated in our dice game with the gods,
however, our time is running out."

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading

Are you getting our free newsletter?

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.

b. "Copenhagen conference needs to adopt the 'spontaneous order of
rationality'"

Guangdong 21st Century Publishing Company Ltd.'s business newspaper
21st Century Business Herald (21Shiji Jingji Baodao)(12/08)(pg 2):
"What has hindered the Copenhagen conference from reaching a
comprehensive agreement is the recognition of the emission reduction
goals and the allocation of reductions. When we use Friedrich
Hayek's theory of 'spontaneous order' and the principle 'that the
marginal benefit of an increase in economic welfare equals the
marginal cost of carbon emissions' to look at the Copenhagen
conference, we hope that the 'Rio - Kyoto' line will increase
adaptability. We agree with the concept of 'common but
differentiated responsibilities' which will give China and India
'autonomy' and allow them to 'voluntarily' implement their emission
reduction measures, encourage all countries to allocate 0.5% of
their GDPs as the fund to research and develop low-carbon technology
and change their antipathy towards fossil energy to reduce demand of
biological fuel. "

2. AFGHANISTAN

"Sending troops to Afghanistan will cause trouble for China"

The official Communist Party international news publication Global
Times (Huanqiu Shibao)(12/08)(pg 14): "The new U.S. plan in
Afghanistan to increase troops needs help from the international
community, especially from China. China, however, along with the
international community, hopes to solve the issue through peaceful
means. If China agrees to send troops to Afghanistan, China will
possibly arouse the terrorists' revenge. The theory of 'the China
threat' will grow as well. Meanwhile, some South Asian nations will
speculate about China's intentions. On the Afghanistan issue, China
will only send peacekeeping troops to help the Afghan people to
reconstruct their homeland, but will not send combat forces into the
country. China could also participate in Afghan affairs through
many other means if Afghanistan needs help: for example, more
humanitarian aid, sending more military police to help train Afghan
officers or helping Afghanistan to train their anti-drug forces."

HUNTSMAN

© Scoop Media

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading
 
 
 
World Headlines

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Join Our Free Newsletter

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.