Celebrating 25 Years of Scoop
Special: Up To 25% Off Scoop Pro Learn More

Search

 

Cablegate: Guidance: Middle East Consultations, December 17

VZCZCXYZ0000
OO RUEHWEB

DE RUEHC #7868 3490304
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
O 150303Z DEC 09
FM SECSTATE WASHDC
TO RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK IMMEDIATE 0000
INFO RUEHTV/AMEMBASSY TEL AVIV IMMEDIATE 0000
RUEHJM/AMCONSUL JERUSALEM IMMEDIATE 0000

UNCLAS STATE 127868

SENSITIVE
SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PREL UNSC IS KPAL
SUBJECT: GUIDANCE: MIDDLE EAST CONSULTATIONS, DECEMBER 17

1. (U) This is an action request. USUN may draw from para
two elements when making its intervention during Middle
East consultations in the Security Council on December 17.

2. (SBU) Begin elements:

I thank Special Coordinator Serry for his report.

Advancing the cause of comprehensive peace in the Middle
East remains among the United States' most important
foreign policy endeavors. Our commitment to this goal is
unwavering, and it is only through negotiations that this
objective can be realized.

As Secretary of State Clinton said on November 25, we
believe that through good faith negotiations the parties
can mutually agree on an outcome which ends the conflict
and reconciles the Palestinian goal of an independent and
viable state based on the 1967 lines, with agreed swaps,
and the Israeli goal of a Jewish state with secure and
recognized borders that reflect subsequent developments.

The most significant development since the Council
discussed this matter in November has been the declaration
by the Israeli government of a moratorium on new
settlement construction in the West Bank. As Special
Envoy for Middle East Peace Mitchell has stated, while
this moratorium falls short of a full settlement freeze,
the steps announced by Prime Minister Netanyahu are
significant and could have substantial impact on the
ground. They are more than any Israeli Government has
done before, and can help move toward agreement between
the parties that will ultimately lead to an end to the
conflict and a two-state solution.

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading

Are you getting our free newsletter?

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.

It is important to underscore in this regard that a freeze
on settlement activity is an Israeli obligation under the
Roadmap, and that the Quartet has long called on all
parties to uphold their Roadmap obligations. United
States policy on settlements remains unaffected and
unchanged. As President Obama has stated, America does
not accept the legitimacy of continued Israeli
settlements. United States policy on Jerusalem also
remains unaffected and unchanged. The status of Jerusalem
and all other permanent status issues should be resolved
through negotiations.

The United States disagrees with some Israeli actions in
Jerusalem affecting Palestinians in areas such as housing,
including the continuing pattern of evictions and
demolitions of Palestinian homes. We do not accept
unilateral actions by the parties that could have the
effect of preempting, or appearing to pre-empt,
negotiations.

[Optional Contingency Point on the December 11 Yasuf
Mosque incident: We condemn the recent attack on a mosque
in the West Bank in the strongest terms and call for the
perpetrators to be brought to justice. We understand that
an investigation is under way.]

Having said that, we see positive steps to improve the
atmosphere for negotiations, such as the settlements
moratorium, as a valuable contribution towards achieving
the goal of a two-state solution. That is why we also
have urged the Palestinian Authority to continue and
expand its ongoing security efforts and to take strong and
meaningful action on incitement.

Similarly, we call for Israel to reopen crossings, with
appropriate monitoring and appreciation for security
concerns, so that legitimate goods can enter Gaza
consistent with UN Security Council Resolution 1860, thus
alleviating the hardships and stress that civilians in
Gaza face every day.

We also continue to urge Arab states to take steps toward
normalization of relations with Israel. As direct
negotiations resume, we seek to re-establish a
multilateral track in which regional governments,
including Israel, would meet to discuss issues they have
in common, such as energy and water, to the benefit of
everyone in the region. The best approach is a mix of
contacts and a variety of tracks, including high-level
direct talks that establish the framework and set the
tone, parallel talks with the U.S. about key issues, and
lower-level direct talks where the details of issues are
often worked out.

We also continue to call on Hamas to accept the principles
established by the Quartet that are the building blocks of
an independent Palestinian state--renunciation of
violence, recognition of Israel, and acceptance of
previous agreements between the parties--and demonstrate
that they are more interested in building a better future
for the Palestinian people than in rhetoric. We also continue
to call for the immediate release of Gilad Shalit.

As Special Envoy Mitchell has made clear, despite the
difficulties and the complex political circumstances in
the region, we are committed to re-launching
negotiations. We will not be deterred by setbacks. We
are determined to stay the course in the cause of
comprehensive peace in the Middle East.

Lastly, we congratulate the new Lebanese government on its
vote of Parliamentary confidence. We call upon all
parties to fulfill the provisions of Security Council
resolutions 1559, 1680, and 1701.

End elements.
CLINTON

© Scoop Media

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading
 
 
 
World Headlines

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Join Our Free Newsletter

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.