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Cablegate: Ecuador: S/Gwi Project Proposals

VZCZCXYZ0000
RR RUEHWEB

DE RUEHQT #0188/01 0491631
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
R 181608Z FEB 10
FM AMEMBASSY QUITO
TO RUEHC/SECSTATE WASHDC 0992
INFO RUEHBO/AMEMBASSY BOGOTA
RUEHBR/AMEMBASSY BRASILIA
RUEHCV/AMEMBASSY CARACAS
RUEHGL/AMCONSUL GUAYAQUIL
RUEHLP/AMEMBASSY LA PAZ
RUEHPE/AMEMBASSY LIMA
RUEHQT/AMEMBASSY QUITO

UNCLAS QUITO 000188

SIPDIS

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: PREL KWMN KPAO PHUM AID EC
SUBJECT: Ecuador: S/GWI Project Proposals

REF: STATE 132094; STATE 12531

1. Embassy Quito submits the following two proposals for
consideration by the Secretary's Office of Global Women's Issues
small grant initiative. Both proposals were submitted by respected
local organizations with the capacity to achieve the stated goals
and meet USG requirements for accountability and reporting and meet
the requirements listed in reftel. The proposals below are copied
from the original documents submitted by each organization and have
not been edited by Post, other than re-formatting for cable
transmission. The first proposal responds to a well-defined need
among indigenous women working in mountainous areas of the country
to understand and respond to climate change in the fragile
ecosystems of their high-altitude farms. Indigenous women are
traditionally a marginalized group by almost every measure, and
giving them the skills and knowledge to respond to changing
environments will help keep both the communities and ecological
systems protected, while empowering women to take charge of the
environmental and economic changes that will impact their
livelihoods. This project dovetails with current efforts at Post,
defined in the FY2010 Mission Strategic Plan (MSP), to promote
economic growth and sustainable development, including efforts to
promote environmental protection.

2. The second proposal is also targeted to marginalized indigenous
women, but the target groups are located in the eastern Amazon
provinces. Building on previous development efforts to promote
cultural preservation and economic self-sufficiency, the program
will enable women to commercialize and market their traditional
handicrafts, which will help provide sustainable livings and
encourage their participation in the economic life of their
communities. This project also serves the FY2010 MSP goal of
promoting economic growth and sustainable development.

3. If the proposals received funding, the grants can be issued at
Post by warranted grants officers in the Public Affairs Section,
with the grants officer responsibilities held by the human rights
officer in the Political Section. The Political Section will take
the lead in grants monitoring and reporting the information to the
grants officer at Post and to S/GWI. Both sections understand the
requirements for both mid-term and final reporting and
accountability for project funds. NOTE: both organizations
submitted proposals that met the guidelines in reftel, but cable
formatting by Post has changed the layout and formatting
significantly. The originals will be emailed toQGWI separately.

4. Proposal 1: Organization: FONAG (www.fonag.org.ec)

Title: CLIMATE CHANGE, A CHALLENGE FOR PARAMO WOMEN

1. PROBLEM:

The rural, indigenous communities where the project will be located
are found within the cantons of Quito, Mejia, Cayambe (in the
Pichincha province), and El Chaco (in the Napo province). These
communities exist above 3,000 meters altitude in what is uniquely
known as a paramo ecosystem. The paramo is a tropical mountain
ecosystem located between the limits of Andean forests and the
snowline.

A large portion of each protected area where the Fund for Water
Protection (FONAG) works (Cayambe Coca Ecological Reserve,
Antisana, Ilinizas and Cotopaxi National Park) encompasses this
classification of ecosystem which benefits Andean populations with
numerous environmental services, especially water, due to its
primary function in water regulation. Thanks to these
contributions, 70% of water consumed within the Metropolitan
District of Quito is attributed to the paramo.

The main productive activities of these communities are agriculture
and livestock which, given its intensity and extent, have resulted

in the advancement of the agricultural frontier. This has not only
detrimentally affected the vegetation cover and biodiversity within
these regions but also has a direct effect on soil and water
quality.

Aside from local impacts produced by intensive agricultural and
extensive livestock activities, there exists a global threat to
paramo ecosystems, which are especially vulnerable to climate
change. Since this ecosystem is restricted to high mountain areas,
any variation in temperature poses a threat to local species, soil
properties, and unique climate characteristics.

"The climate is no longer the same as before," say the people in
paramo communities. Significant decreases in annual rainfall,
persistent droughts, and increasing frost cover have directly
impacted the quantity and quality of locally grown crops as well as
the food cycles that sustain these agricultural communities. In
turn, these factors have intensified the poverty in which the
communities live.

A large portion of agricultural practices are currently inefficient
in the paramo due to the inappropriate usage of seeds,
monocultures, poor soil care, misuse of water, and insufficient
pest control among others issues. Additionally, paramo inhabitants
depend on rain cycles and favourable conditions within the
ecosystem for the provision of water. In turn, this strongly
emphasises the importance of conservation within protected areas
that provide potable water to a large human population.

The local families have already sought alternatives in order to
adapt to changing climate. Women have formed watch groups for frost
prevention by implementing traditional Andean techniques used to
protect crops. Other families have chosen to search for and select
resistant seed strains and promote agro-biodiversity. However, for
many families the only option is migration and land abandonment.

Women living in the communities where the project will be
implemented are responsible for roughly 50% of food production used
for domestic consumption. In practice, these women play a majority
role in the management and utilization of the local natural
resources, making them the most vulnerable group to the effects of
climate change and local environmental issues.

Linked to the problems described above is also the issue of
historical and cultural gender inequality. Traditionally, a woman's
role focuses more on the production aspect and not on product
management and/or decision making regarding proper resource
management.

2. PROPOSAL SUMMARY

This project seeks the involvement of paramo women as guardians of
traditional practices and resource conservation, taking into
account that these are the people facing climate change as a
current reality. The women of the paramo, given the opportunity,
stand to create harmonious development within their communities and
provide appropriate access and usage of the resources which they
manage. Through this integrated process, women will be given the
chance to improve and demonstrate practical skills, exercise their
rights, and enhance their role in finding appropriate solutions to
environmental issues.

The project also presents the challenge of consolidating, promoting
and developing adaptive activities related to climate change and
creating spaces that allow women located in the paramo to
strengthen their abilities and balance their role in the community
- whether social, economic or environmental.

Additionally, the project seeks to be a link for women from the
four protected areas and their buffer zones to establish spaces for
learning, discussion, and proposal regarding environmental, social,
and economic issues. This, in turn, coincides with the conservation
of protected areas.

The strategies of this proposal are:

1. Capacity building for women in paramo communities located within
protected areas and/or their buffer zones in the following themes:
climate change adaptation, conservation, gender rights,
organization, and production development.

2. Development of alternative products adapted to climate change
led by women.

3. Recuperation, recovery, and socialization of knowledge and
practices of women living in protected areas within the paramo and
its buffer zones in relation to climate change.

3. SUSTAINABILITY

FONAG is a private equity fund with a lifespan of 80 years and,
through a trust fund, has been operating since January, 2000. It is
regulated by the Securities Markets Act. FONAG's equity capital is
comprised of mixed contributions from local businesses as well as
private and international institutions.

FONAG aims to lead processes and consensus through dialogue,
appropriate decision making, strengthening of research, and the use
of appropriate technology to achieve Integrated Water Resources
Management, where active, responsible, and caring participation
from human beings will lead to the indefinite, sustainable
management of the resource.

The trust is an economic financial mechanism that is permanent and
stable. It uses income from assets to co-finance activities,
projects, and rehabilitation programs. It also works to conserve
and manage the watersheds which supply water for human usage and
productive activities in the Metropolitan District of Quito and its
area of influence.

To achieve its objective, FONAG has developed a series of programs
and projects that seek to rehabilitate, care for, and conserve
water sources which are supplied to the Metropolitan District of
Quito and its areas of influence.

Seven of every ten liters of water consumed by residents of the DMQ
(Metropolitan District of Quito) comes from the nature reserves of
Cayambe-Coca, Antisana, Los Ilinizas and Cotopaxi National Park as
part of the National System of Protected Areas (SNAP) administered
by the Ministry of Environment.

In 2004, FONAG promoted the birth of the Surveillance and
Monitoring Program designed to last 20 years. One of the challenges
promoted by the program is to integrate the various community
actors currently interfering with protected areas or their buffer
zones to protect their natural resources through capacity building,
generating suggestions through participatory means, and the
development of alternatives which take into consideration the
sensitivity of the environment.

Since 2006, twenty community projects have been implemented with
approximately 350 families who are involved in the conservation of
the natural environment of the paramo. These projects work to
develop and strengthen human capabilities while integrating
productive activities that are linked to resource protection.

Previously developed projects have focused on various
eco-productive activities such as agro-ecology, integrated farms,
the processing of medicinal plants, ecotourism, and pasture
improvement, among others.

There is a common characteristic within the projects developed by
the program: 80% of the participants in all activities are women.
These are women who take responsibility for disseminating knowledge
through conversations with friends and family and who have an
invested interest in the land and the products which it generates.
This involvement has signified the undertaking of new challenges
that also strengthen their role in decision making and the
exercising of power.

FONAG's input and experience will contribute to the posterior
actions of the project in its search for sustainability and
replication. However, it is the exercising of women's power,
acquiring of knowledge, and linking of strategies with productive
commercial sectors that will allow each community to create
sustainable conditions for responsible and opportune development
regarding climate change.

4. OBJECTIVES, OUTPUTS, & INDICATORS

Project Strategy

General Objective:

To implement effective strategies and practices for adaptation to
climate change in terms of capacity building of women's groups in
paramo zones

Indicators:

- 18 months in four communities located in protected areas and/or
their buffer zones. At least 100 women will have strengthened their
capabilities in the training axes identified by the project: rights


- At least 60 women in four protected areas or their buffer zones
have the capacity to develop productive projects that take into
account environmental protection and climate change adaptation.

- At least 60 families of four protected areas and/or their buffer
zones will have been involved in a project linked to a community
adaptation strategy that improves the economic conditions of
households headed by women

Verification:

Monitoring Plan and Participatory Evaluation , Progress Reports,
Photos of the process

Specific Objective 1.

Developing the skills of Ecuadorian women living in four protected
areas or in their buffer zones in the exercising of their rights,
appreciation of their culture, and self-esteem.

Indicators:

- In 18 months at least 100 women from four communities living in
protected areas or their buffer zones will have been involved in a
process of discussion, exchange and training in the following
areas: women's rights, organization, productive development,
climate change and conservation

Verification:

Socialized document regarding training in rights, culture and
self-esteem

Reports of training events, Photography, Evaluation of events


Result 1.1. The capacities of women in four communities of
protected areas will be strengthened in local adaptation strategies
regarding climate change, development of sustainable, productive
projects and organization.

Indicators:

- At least 100 women will have participated in a training process
on climate change strategies and conservations regarding protected
areas over the course of at least 3 workshops in their communities.


- At least 60 women will have participated in two integration

forums of between women of the 4 protected areas to share their
experiences, challenges and opportunities as women regarding
climate change.

- At least 100 women will have strengthened their organizational
abilities and will be able to develop eco-productive projects as a
strategy to adapt to climate change.

Verification:

Organizational training plan - economic and environmental Memories
of planning and deveQpment of events Lists of attendees Event
Evaluation

Result 1.2. These women will have strengthened their ability to
exercise their rights, culture and self-esteem as women living in
communities in the four protected areas and/or their buffer zones.

Indicator:

- At least 100 women from four communities living within protected
areas or their buffer zones will have participated in 4 events:
rights training, cultural self-esteem, and strengthening their
communities

Verification:

Socialized document of training plan regarding rights, culture, and
self-esteem, Memories of training events, Photography, Event
evaluation

Objetivo specific 2. Implement and/or strengthen productive
initiatives for adaptation to climate change led by Ecuadorian
women in four communities located in four protected areas

Indicator:

- Over the course of 18 months, there will have been four
environmental projects - productive adaptation to climate change
led by women from four communities in priority protected areas with
food sovereignty

Verification:

Project proposals approved, Operational plans, Project
participation, Project progress

Result 2.1 Participating women will have been developed and/or
expanded four productive and sustainable community alternatives in
order to adapt to climate change

Indicator:

- In 18 months, participating women will have been identified and
implemented four proposals for the development and/or strengthening
of productive activities as an initiative of ecological adaptation
to climate change.

- At least 60 women will be appropriately linked to an
eco-productive project in four communities in protected areas
and/or their buffer zones.

- Participating women will have identified at least one company
and/or local and/or national institution that works with a logic of
fair trade and where there is feasibility of negotiation and
involvement within their value chains

Verification:

Community diagnostics, Bimonthly Progress in operational plans,
Community project maps indicating local actors, List of actors,
Photos of the process

OE3. Systematize knowledge and practices to recognize and value the
roles of women in adaptation strategies regarding climate change
and the protection of natural resources

Indicator:

- In 18 months, four experiences will have been systematized with
women from protected areas and/or their buffer zones for the
conservation of protected areas and measures for adaptation and
mitigation of climate change

Verification:

Publication of documents and video collection of women's
experiences.

Result 3.1. The knowledge and practices of participating women will
have been systemized within the four protected areas and their
buffer zones

Indicator:

- A respectful and participatory methodology will have been
developed through this community experience which will allow for
systemizing and documentation the participating women's knowledge
and practices as well as their roles and challenges with respect to
conservation in protected areas and climate change.

- At least four experiences will been documented through video and
through a publication on women, protected areas, and climate change


Verification:

Experimental methodology on communal living for collection and
documentation of the information, Reports on project progress,
Document inventory of the experience, Video inventory of the
experience

5. Project timeline: 18 months. (Note: FONAG included a graph
with their activities plan. Post will forward the entire formatted
project to S/GWI via email.)

6. Budget:

Project Strategy Unit
Amount US/Unit

Specific objective 1.

Result 1. 1. 1.

A.1.1.1 Community Training: adaptation strategies and challenges of
Climate Change

Workshop

16

410,00

A.1.1.2. Integration Forum between women of the 4 protected areas
to share the experiences, challenges and opportunities of women
regarding climate change

Forum

2

1.450,00

Result 1. 2


A.1.2.1 Our right to all rights

Workshop

4

410,00


A.1.2.2. "Field trip" to a cultural landmark: Rights of indigenous
womens groups and strengthening the culture

Trip to Rural Countryside

4

350,00


A.1.2.3 The right to live in right relationships: caring and
affection in our living spaces

Workshop

4

410,00


A.1.2.4 Women's organization and participation

Workshop

4

410,00


A.1.2.5. Women living and strengthen their leadership

Workshop

4

410,00


A.1.2.6. Workshop on the Development of Productive Ecological
Projects

Workshop

4

810,00


Specific Objective 2.


Result 2.1.


A.2.1 Participatory diagnostic: social, economic, environmental and
productive communities

Consultation

1

8.000,00


A.2.2. Submission of proposals for productive projects such as
ecological adaptation strategies to climate change

Workshop

4

205,00


A.2.3. Development Projects: productive ecological adaptation to
climate change

Project

4

9.500,00


A.3.4. Monitoring and Evaluation

Thesis

2

3.060,00


Specific Objective 3


Result 3.1.


A.3.1. Experiential methodology to systematize and document the
knowledge and practices of women, their roles and challenges with
respect to conservation in protected areas and climate change

Workshop

4

810,00


A.3.2. Presentation and approval of proposals for documentation of
experiences

Workshop

4

205,00


A.3.3 Script shots made and approved

Consultation

1

4.000,00


A.3.4. Video and Document Editing

Consultation

1

4.000,00


A.3.5. Review of video and document drafts
Qnsultation

1

800,00


A.3.6. Review and approval of video and document

Consultation

1

800,00


Coordinator

18

600,00


Subtotal


Visibility: FONAG & USG


2%

Total
100.021,20

5. Proposal 2: Organization: Sinchi Sacha (www.sinchisacha.org)

Title: INDIGENOUS WOMEN, TRADITIONAL CRAFTS AND MARKET CONCEPT
PAPER

1. SUMMARY

Project Title

Indigenous women, traditional crafts and market


Location

Ecuadorian Amazonia

Project Duration

18 months

Total Budget

USD$ 100,000.oo

Programme Sectors

Economic opportunity

Beneficiaries

50 omen leaders and 250 people

2. BACKGROUND

The Ecuadorian Amazonia is characterized by its ecological
fragility, ethnical diversity, and extraordinary biodiversity. It
is precisely those, the ancestral indigenous territories, the ones
considered to be in good condition, with more than 6 million
Hectares of native forest, representing 50% of the country's
forests. Indigenous women are the mainstay to give continuity to
the traditional ways of living, of which the main characteristic is
conservation of natural resources.

Sinchi Sacha Foundation (www.sinchisacha.org
) has promoted cooperation relations
with indigenous populations in the Amazonia, particularly women,
for some 15 years now, fostering the development of artisanal
production initiatives under the concept of Fair Trade.

Family production units got involved in a range of activities which
promoted artisanal production and commercialization, recovery of
cultural heritage of these peoples, their symbols, representations
of daily life, and identity values, with training strategies to
improve product designs and quality. It is their work which has
given aggregate value to traditional production.

During all these years, they created their own commercialization
spaces, from which they generated possibilities to improve
products, determine prices, formalize the legal status of artisans
(invoices, taxes, etc.), as well as a gradual integration to the
formal market, among other aspects. These activities were carried
out within the framework of the execution of USAID-funded projects,
such as CAIMAN.

As a result of these processes, there are now artisanal production
networks in operation across the entire Ecuadorian Amazonia. From
all of them, three peoples of particular characteristics stand out:


- Cofan craftswomen

- Kichwa women ceramicists of Pastaza

- Huaorani craftswomen

In each territorial space, women leaders have been in training and
acting as local promoters in product identification, training in
artisanal design, articulation and representation with
socio-organizational structures, among others. Nevertheless, they
do not have defined commercialization mechanisms, this segment
being one of their main weaknesses.

Summing up, they have an interesting production base, experience in
creating products; they have achieved some visibility in
socio-organizational structures within communities, but continue to
have deficiencies in commercialization mechanisms. These are the
issues addressed by the project.


3. PROJECT OBJECTIVES


General objective: Consolidate commercialization systems of
artisanal products made by craftswomen organizations of the Cofan,
Kichwa of Pastaza, and Huaorani nationalities, located in the
provinces of Sucumbios, Orellana, and Pastaza.

Specific objectives:

a. Consolidate artisanal production initiatives of indigenous
women organizations

b. Train indigenous women in traditional management and fair
trade

c. Develop product promotion, diffusion, and marketing
activities


4. METHODOLOGY AND SUSTAINABILITY


Each Amazonian people has its own life story and experiences in
different production segments. A piece of craft is a cultural
product remaining characteristic of each people, representative of
specific cultural traditions. Therefore, the project proposes a
general methodology, with specific approaches for each people:

- The general methodology is based on the active participation of
women in the design, formulation, and execution of the project.
Therefore, a basic register of women leaders of each production
group has been carried out, which will be completed until it
reaches a total of 50 craftswomen.

- Handmade products have multiple meanings which must be expressed
and communicated in each one of the pieces of craft. Thus,
gathering the aggregate value of culture and the way of making the
products.

- Pieces of craft of the Amazonia contain some environmental and
cultural characteristics, this being the reason why they cannot be
massively produced. They have a very high market niche within our
own country, if we take into consideration the number of tourists
entering the country each year (around one million), they promote
the installation of a local market dynamic and the propagation of
these cultural products at the local level, which inspires an
aesthetic valorization of our own selves.

- The art of crafting has to be in constant development and
improvement, along with the development, transformation and
resignification of the imagination and culture, therefore various
and diverse training is needed. Craftswomen will receive training
on these and other related topics, to promote relatively stable
markets for them to sell their products, in viable, simple, and
effective operation schemes.

From the particularity of interventions, we propose the following
specific methodological criteria:

For Cofan craftswomen

As we may know, the Cofan people are settled in disperse
territories and, in all of them, the production of pieces of craft
is generalized, for it is a complementary economic activity,
particularly for women.

Adding up all territorial spaces, we have established a
participation margin of up to 15 women leaders, who at present act
as local promoters in product identification, training in artisanal
design, articulation and representation with socio-organizational
structures, among other activities.

The Ecuadorian Federation of Indigenous Organizations of the COFAN
Nationality (FEINCE) will act as the local partneQwithin the
project, represented by the official delegate of the organization.

For Kichwa women ceramists of Pastaza

In the province of Pastaza, women ceramists make their products in
partnership with others, as well as with their family. From the
direct market experience carried out by the Sinchi Sacha Foundation
and its fair trade network, we have observed that mucahuas made in
Pastaza are a product which is very appreciated by tourists and
always have a high demand.

The methodologiQ criteria consist on the selection of 15
craftswomen, both from organized groups and family production
units. The work with this segment will be focused on providing
training to women leaders to improve their ability to fulfill
market orders, specific training in product size and design.

For Huaorani Women

The Waorani Women's Association of Ecuador (AMWAE) has been in
operation in the Huaorani territory for several years. It groups
more than 200 women leaders from 36 communities, who live distant
from each other in a territorial extension of 678,220 Hectares.

The AMWAE has its headquarters in Puyo and has a craft shop that
has consolidated over time. They demand an improvement in artisanal
production lines, promotion and commercialization. The Association
has selected 20 women leaders, 15 of who will specialize in
artisanal design, production, and orders; and the 5 remaining will
provide training in the communities, on promotion and
commercialization.


5. ACTIVITIES


a. Consolidate initiatives of artisanal production of indigenous
women organizations

Three participation workshops on artisanal production chains

Provide support for technical administration in Cofan and Huaorani
craft shops

Packaging techniques and attachment of informational tags on
products

b. Train indigenous women on artisanal management and fair trade

Six workshops on artisanal management: size, price, and orders

Six workshops on training for fairs and trade

Exchange of experiences on craft fair trade

c. Develop product promotion, diffusion, and marketing activities

Print 500 documents of Cofan, Kichwa and Huaorani ethnical art for
sale

Print of Cofan, Kichwa and Huaorani art brands

Design and printing of 3 artisanal catalogues

Participation in 3 national fairs, including a fair to present
results


6. OUTCOMES


6.1 Indigenous women organizations have strengthened family
initiatives of craft production and partnership

a) Fifty women have received training on artisanal production
chains

b) Two craft shops have improved their technical and
commercial management

c) All three organizations (Cofan, Kichwa, and Huaorani) have
received training on packaging techniques and elaboration of
informational tags.

6.2 Train indigenous women on artisanal management and fair trade


a) Fifteen women leaders have been trained on artisanal
management: size, price, and orders

b) Fifteen women leaders have been trained on participation in
fairs and artisanal trade

c) Six women leaders now know how to put fair trade in
practice through an exchange of experiences

6.3 Develop product promotion, diffusion, and marketing activities

a) 500 documents of Cofan, Kichwa and Huaorani ethnical art
have been printed for sale

b) Cofan, Kichwa, and Huaorani crafts are commercialized under
their own artisanal brands

c) Three organizations of indigenous craftswomen have their
own catalogues of artisanal products.

d) They have participated in 3 national fairs, one of them
dedicated to present the final results of the project


7. BUDGET


ACTIVITIES / OUTCOMES

BUDGET REQUESTED

PARTNER

Indigenous women organizations have strengthened family initiatives
of craft production and partnership

a) Fifty women leaders have received training on artisanal
production chains

10.000,00

1,000.00


b) Two craft shops have improved their technical and commercial
management

25.000,00

2,000.00


c) All three organizations (Cofan, Kichwa, and Huaorani) have
received training on packaging techniques and elaboration of
informational tags

10.000,00


Train indigenous women on artisanal management and fair trade


a) Fifteen women leaders have received training on artisanal
management: size, price, and orders

16.000,00

800.00


b) Fifteen women leaders have been trained on participation in
fairs and artisanal trade

16.000,00

800.00


c) Six women leaders now know how to put fair trade in practice
through an exchange of experiences

16.000,00

1,500.00


Develop product promotion, diffusion, and marketing activities


a) 500 documents of Cofan and Huaorani ethnical art have been
printed for sale

1.000,00


b) Cofan, Kichwa, and Huaorani crafts are commercialized under
their own artisanal brands

1.000,00


c) Three organizations of indigenous craftswomen have their own

catalogues of artisanal products.

1.000,00


d) They have participated in 3 national fairs, one of them
dedicated to present the final results of the project

4.000,00


TOTAL

100.000,00

6,100.00

8. TIMETABLE AND INDICATORS

ACTIVITIES / OUTCOMES/Timeline

Indigenous women organizations have strengthened the family
initiatives of craft production and partnership

a. Fifty women leaders have received training on artisanal
production chains; Month 1-3

b. Two craft shops have improved their technical and commercial
management; Month 4-6

c. All three organizations (Cofan, Kichwa, and Huaorani) have
received training on packaging techniques and elaboration of
informational tags; Month 6-8

Train indigenous women on artisanal management and fair trade

a. Fifteen women leaders have received trained on artisanal
management: size, price, and orders, Month 3,6,9

b. Fifteen women leaders have been trained on participation in
fairs and artisanal trade; Month 4,7,10

c. Six women leaders now know how to put fair trade in practice
through an exchange of experiences, Month 9

Develop product promotion, diffusion, and marketing activities

a. 500 documents of Cofan and Huaorani ethnical art have been
printed for sale; Month 5

b. Cofan, Kichwa, and Huaorani crafts are commercialized under
their own artisanal brands, Month 6

c. Three organizations of indigenous craftswomen have their own
catalogues of artisanal products; Month 9

d. They have participated in 3 national fairs, one of them
dedicated to present the final results of the project; Month 9-12
HODGES

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Focus On: UN SDGs

Climate: ‘Vague’ Net Zero Promises Not Enough: Planet Still On Track For Catastrophic Heating, UN Report Warns

New and updated commitments made ahead of the pivotal climate conference COP26 in the past months are a positive step forward, but the world remains on track for a dangerous global temperature rise of at least 2.7°C this century even if fully met, a new report by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) has warned... More>>

Pacific: Young Climate Leaders Call For Urgent Climate Action Ahead Of COP26

Eight Pacific Young Climate Leaders shared their experiences of climate resilience and activism in an inaugural dialogue with the Pacific Islands Forum Secretary General, Mr Henry Puna on 21 October 2021... More>>

UN: With Clock Ticking, Sustainable Transport Key To Global Goals
From electric cars and buses to zero-carbon producing energy sources, new and emerging technologies along with innovative policy changes, are critical for combating climate change. But to be effective, they must ensure that transport strategies benefit everyone, including the poorest... More>>