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Cablegate: Non-Paper for Russia On Proposed U.S.-Russia

VZCZCXRO5646
OO RUEHSK RUEHSL
DE RUEHC #1173/01 0342341
ZNR UUUUU ZZH
O 032334Z FEB 10
FM SECSTATE WASHDC
TO RUEHMO/AMEMBASSY MOSCOW IMMEDIATE 7153
INFO RUEHFR/AMEMBASSY PARIS IMMEDIATE 8284
RUEHLO/AMEMBASSY LONDON PRIORITY 9144
RUEHOT/AMEMBASSY OTTAWA PRIORITY 1282
RUEHGV/USMISSION GENEVA PRIORITY 0220
RUEHBS/USEU BRUSSELS PRIORITY
RUEHUNV/USMISSION UNVIE VIENNA PRIORITY 6049
DISARMAMENT CONFERENCE COLLECTIVE
RUEHBJ/AMEMBASSY BEIJING 2792
RUEHRL/AMEMBASSY BERLIN 6106
RUEHBS/AMEMBASSY BRUSSELS 6256
RUEHBY/AMEMBASSY CANBERRA 6395
RUEHMD/AMEMBASSY MADRID 3838
RUEHRO/AMEMBASSY ROME 3999
RUEHKO/AMEMBASSY TOKYO 2154
RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK 9722

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 05 STATE 011173

SENSITIVE
SIPDIS
GENEVA FOR CD DELEGATION

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: CDG MCAP NASA PARM RS TSPA UNPUOS
SUBJECT: NON-PAPER FOR RUSSIA ON PROPOSED U.S.-RUSSIA
SPACE SECURITY DIALOGUE

REF: A. 09 STATE 116396
B. 09 MOSCOW 2809
C. 09 STATE 54933
D. 09 UNVIEVIENNA 324
E. 09 STATE 58525
F. 09 STATE 082572

1. (U) THIS IS AN ACTION REQUEST. See paragraph 4 below.

2. (SBU) BACKGROUND: On January 20, 2010, in an Aide
Memoire, the Russian MFA Department of Security and
Disarmament (DVBR) responded to a U.S. non-paper dated
November 11, 2009. The U.S. non-paper had accepted Russia's
proposal for a resumption of dialogues between U.S. and
Russian experts on space-related issues, and proposed two
half-day meetings in Paris in January (Refs A and B). The
Russian aide-memoire (paragraph 8) accepted the U.S. proposed
agenda with modest changes and agreed to a meeting in March.

3. (SBU) Washington is prepared to accept GoR's revised
agenda and proposes to convene meetings in Paris, France, on
March 23-24. However, the Department is concerned about the
Aide-Memoire's characterization of this meeting as being "of
a planning nature." Such a description of this proposed
meeting was not used by the United States in its non-paper of
November 11, 2009, or in previous exchanges in May and June
2009 (Refs C, D, and E). The "planning" description - which
was also used by Moscow to characterize the first
U.S.-Russian Joint Threat Assessment meeting in July 2009
(Ref F) - suggests that some elements of GoR might see the
first meeting as an opportunity to receive detailed
presentations from U.S. experts without offering reciprocal
contributions by Russian experts. As a result, Washington
requires an assurance from Moscow that the first meeting will
have a substantive focus. Otherwise, if Moscow insists on
holding a mere "planning meeting," the planned composition of
the USDEL and the duration of this March meeting will need to
be re-evaluated. The United States would still wish to
participate in such a meeting, however. END BACKGROUND.

4. (SBU) ACTION REQUEST: Embassy is requested to pass the
U.S. non-paper (contained in paragraph 5 below) to
appropriate host government officials at the MFA and the
Russian Space Agency (Roscosmos). Embassy is also requested
to provide copies directly/directly to the Ministry of
Defense, specifically highlighting U.S. interest in
scheduling reciprocal visits this year to military space
operations centers. Embassy may draw upon the contingency
talking points in paragraph 6 and agreed agenda in paragraph
7. Post is requested to report its deliveries and any GoR
reactions at the time of delivery. END ACTION REQUEST.

5. (SBU) BEGIN U.S. NON-PAPER:

Non-Paper
February 3, 2010

The United States is pleased to respond to the Russian
Federation's Aide-Memoire of January 20, 2010, regarding a
prospective meeting between U.S. and Russian space policy
officials and their experts.

The United States is pleased that the Russian Federation
continues to express its interest in the development of a
bilateral dialogue on national security space policy. The
United States, therefore, accepts Russia's proposed agenda
and agrees to hold two half-day meetings on March 23-24 in
Paris, France. The United States proposes to host the first
half-day of discussions, beginning at 1:00 p.m., at the U.S.
Embassy and also proposes that Russia host the second
half-day on March 24 at the Russian Embassy.

STATE 00011173 002 OF 005

With regard to the purpose and objectives of this meeting,
the United States reiterates its long-stated view that
bilateral discussions between our two governments can focus
without delay on pragmatic and constructive discussions
between experts from each country's military space
establishments, civilian space agencies, and policy experts.
To ensure these discussions are complete and comprehensive,
the United States intends to include representatives from the
following organizations:

- U.S. Department of State
-- Bureau of Verification, Compliance and Implementation
-- Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation
-- Bureau of Oceans, Environment and Scientific Affairs

- U.S. Department of Defense
-- Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy
-- Joint Chiefs of Staff, Directorate of Strategic Plans and
Policy (J5)
-- United States Strategic Command (USSTRATCOM)
--- Directorate of Global Operations (J3)
--- Directorate of Plans and Policy (J5)
--- Joint Functional Component Command for Space (JFCC SPACE)

- National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
-- Johnson Space Center, Orbital Debris Program Office

The United States will be prepared on March 23-24 to discuss
all agenda items substantively and in depth. The United
States expects any Russian interagency delegation will also
be similarly prepared to engage in a focused and reciprocal
exchange of information and perspectives on all agreed items,
taking into full account the reaffirmation (as stated in
Russia's Aide-Memoire of September 29, 2009) of the Russian
Federation's willingness to resume the dialogue between
Russian and U.S. experts on space-related issues. The United
States does not believe a separate planning meeting is
required to lay the foundation for this substantive dialogue
and looks for Russia's explicit assurance that it is in
agreement on this point.

The United States looks forward to receiving Moscow's
response to Washington's request for a clarification of
Russia's purpose for holding the March meeting and its
proposal for a meeting on March 23-24 in Paris. Also, the
United States requests a list of interagency participants
that will compose the Russian delegation.

END TEXT OF U.S. NON-PAPER.

6. (SBU) BEGIN CONTINGENCY TALKING POINTS:

-- It has been nearly a year since the on-orbit collision of
U.S. and Russian satellites, an event that both our countries
agree is a serious warning of the possibility of hazards
resulting from an increasingly congested and complex space
environment.

-- Since our meeting in Vienna, Austria, in June 2009, the
United States and Russia have been in agreement in principle
on the importance of resuming exchanges between our experts
on space security and related issues. We have also been in
agreement on the main topics for this agenda since September
2009.

-- The United States believes a meeting in March 2010 gives
both the U.S. and Russia ample time to prepare for
substantive discussions and to ensure the participation of
appropriate U.S. and Russian space policy officials and their
experts.

-- A meeting in March would allow adequate time for our two
governments to prepare for expanded collaboration at both the
fifty-third session of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of
Outer Space and the sixty-fifth session of the United Nations

STATE 00011173 003 OF 005


General Assembly.

-- The U.S. delegation would be headed by Mr. Frank Rose, the
Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Defense Policy and
Verification Operations. Detailed information on the
composition of the U.S. delegation will be provided upon
receipt of Russia's acceptance of the dates proposed by the
United States and Moscow's confirmation of a substantive
focus for this meeting.

-- Members of the U.S. delegation from the Joint Chiefs of
Staff and the United States Strategic Command would be
prepared to discuss specific arrangements with their
counterparts from Russia's military space establishment
regarding reciprocal government-to-government visits in 2010
by experts to U.S. and Russian government space operations
centers, including satellite movement control facilities.

END CONTINGENCY TALKING POINTS.

7. (SBU) BEGIN AGREED AGENDA:

Agenda for the Russian-U.S. Meeting of Experts on Issues
Related to the Safety of Outer Space Activities

First Day (the U.S. side to be the hosting party)

1. Introductory words.

2. The Russian and U.S. views of the problem of ensuring the
safety of outer space activities (the Russian side is to
begin).

3. The U.S. and Russian views on the use of outer space for
military purposes; possibilities of providing for common
national security interests; the effect of outer space
activities on strategic stability (the U.S. side is to begin).

4. Russian and U.S. approaches to predicting, preventing, or
minimizing the consequences of hazardous situations in outer
space.

a) The international regime for exchanging information on
predicted hazardous situations in outer space; the necessary
conditions and means for implementing it (including the
Russian side's replies to the U.S. questions of June 8,
2009). (The Russian side is to begin.)

b). Possible ways of preventing or minimizing the
consequences of hazardous situations in outer space and
directing cooperative efforts to implement them (the U.S.
side is to begin).

5. Possible approaches to fleshing out initiatives for
ensuring long-term sustainability of outer space activities
(a topic on the agenda of the Scientific and Technology
Subcommittee of the UN Committee on the Use of Outer Space
for Peaceful Purposes) (the U.S. side is to begin).

6. Possible additional measures for enhancing the safety of
outer space activities (exchange of opinions).

Second day (the Russian side is to be the hosting party)

7. Transparency and confidence-building measures (TCBMs) in
outer space:

a) Russian proposals for TCBMs (document: UN General Assembly
A/64/138/Add. 1 of September 19, 2009) (the Russian side is
to begin).

b) The U.S. side's views.

c) The possibility of implementing agreed TCBMs on a
bilateral basis (exchange of opinions).


STATE 00011173 004 OF 005


8. Russian-U.S. interaction on TCBM related issues in the
First Committee of the UN General Assembly:

a) Review of attempts to co-sponsor a resolution on TCBMs
during the sixty-second and sixty-third sessions of the UN
General Assembly (the U.S. side is to begin).

b) Possibilities of Russian-U.S. cooperation during the
sixty-fifth session of the UN General Assembly (the Russian
side is to begin).

c) Possibilities of preparing, on a bilateral basis, a draft
document on TCBMs based on existing and new proposals by the
states for its subsequent presentation to the international
community (the Russian side is to begin).

9. U.S. and Russian views on a draft code of conduct for
outer space activities that was proposed by the European
Union (the U.S. side is to begin).

10. Exchange of visits of specialists on space-related issues
(the U.S. side is to begin).

11. Summary of results; recording of areas of agreement and
contentious issues; coordination of further steps.

END AGREED AGENDA.

8. (SBU) BEGIN RUSSIA'S AIDE-MEMOIRE:

Aide-Memoire
January 20, 2010

After a careful study of the U.S. response to our
Aide-Memoire of September 29, 2009, we would like to make the
following comments.

The ideas and proposals contained in the U.S. paper of
November 12, 2009, show that the positions of the Parties
regarding resumption of the dialogue on space-related issues
and its importance for constructive development of bilateral
interaction in this area largely coincide. Nor are there
fundamental differences with respect to setting a possible
agenda for the meeting between the Russian and U.S. experts.
It seems acceptable to spread out the topics over the two
days of work scheduled for the upcoming meeting. We have no
fundamental objections to the three additional issues
proposed for consideration by the U.S. side, but we think
they should framed in more concrete terms. Moreover, we
suggest that certain clarifications be made in the agenda,
and therefore we are sending you a revised draft, which takes
into account the U.S. proposals as much as possible
(Paragraph 7).

We agree that this meeting will be of a planning nature
(Translation Note: The word "planning" is used in the
original Russian text), with the aim of setting forth the
Parties' approaches to the issues under consideration. We
anticipate that additional meetings of experts will be
required to further work out a number of issues. If the
interaction between Russia and the U.S. on space-related
issues proceeds in a constructive manner, we do not rule out
the possibility that establishing a Russian-U.S. working
group of experts that operates on a periodic basis will prove
to be helpful and justified.

We also agree that Russia and the U.S. will need time to
prepare a meeting of experts and to ensure that the necessary
specialists take part in it. Since the Parties are currently
focusing their efforts on working out a new treaty on
strategic offensive arms, we would like to propose that the
first meeting of experts be held in March 2010 at a time
convenient for both Parties.

Information on the makeup of the Russian delegation will be
provided later.

STATE 00011173 005 OF 005

END RUSSIA'S AIDE-MEMOIRE.

9. The Department thanks the Embassy for their continued
assistance. Please slug responses for ISN/MDSP-RBuenneke,
OES/SAT-DTurner and EUR/PRA-CCampbell.
CLINTON

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