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Cablegate: Daily Summary of Japanese Press 02/02/10

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PP RUEHFK RUEHKSO RUEHNAG RUEHNH
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P 020803Z FEB 10
FM AMEMBASSY TOKYO
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INFO RUEKJCS/SECDEF WASHDC PRIORITY
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RUEAWJA/USDOJ WASHDC PRIORITY
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RHHMUNA/HQ USPACOM HONOLULU HI
RHHMHBA/COMPACFLT PEARL HARBOR HI
RHMFIUU/HQ PACAF HICKAM AFB HI//CC/PA//
RHMFIUU/USFJ //J5/JO21//
RUYNAAC/COMNAVFORJAPAN YOKOSUKA JA
RUAYJAA/CTF 72
RUEHNH/AMCONSUL NAHA 0958
RUEHFK/AMCONSUL FUKUOKA 8617
RUEHOK/AMCONSUL OSAKA KOBE 2433
RUEHNAG/AMCONSUL NAGOYA 5676
RUEHKSO/AMCONSUL SAPPORO 9113
RUEHBJ/AMEMBASSY BEIJING 2909
RUEHUL/AMEMBASSY SEOUL 9581
RUCNDT/USMISSION USUN NEW YORK 8967

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 07 TOKYO 000209

SIPDIS

DEPT FOR E, P, EB, EAP/J, EAP/P, EAP/PD, PA;
WHITE HOUSE/NSC/NEC; JUSTICE FOR STU CHEMTOB IN ANTI-TRUST DIVISION;
TREASURY/OASIA/IMI/JAPAN; DEPT PASS USTR/PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE;
SECDEF FOR JCS-J-5/JAPAN,
DASD/ISA/EAPR/JAPAN; DEPT PASS ELECTRONICALLY TO USDA
FAS/ITP FOR SCHROETER; PACOM HONOLULU FOR PUBLIC DIPLOMACY ADVISOR;
CINCPAC FLT/PA/ COMNAVFORJAPAN/PA.

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: OIIP KMDR KPAO PGOV PINR ECON ELAB JA

SUBJECT: DAILY SUMMARY OF JAPANESE PRESS 02/02/10

INDEX:

(1) Okinawan officials react strongly to FM Okada's remark on
Futenma remaining where it is if no alternative relocation site can
be found (Ryukyu Shimpo)

(2) Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Matsuno also says continued use
of Futenma base an option (Sankei)

(3) Popular will in Nago - Washington taking wait-and-see attitude
without making specific comments (Okinawa Times)

(4) Public prosecutors question Ozawa again: Tension and dismay in
DPJ (Yomiuri)

(5) Editorial: Japan-China joint study - Differences evident in
historical views (Yomiuri)

(6) Parents and children after divorce (Part 4): Parents should
consider the emotional burden on the child before reaching a
decision to divorce (Yomiuri)

ARTICLES:

(1) Okinawan officials react strongly to FM Okada's remark on
Futenma remaining where it is if no alternative relocation site can
be found

RYUKYU SHIMPO (Page 29) (Excerpts)
February 2, 2010

"If no alternative site can be found, it is possible that Futenma
may remain where it is." Officials of Ginowan City and others
opposed to Futenma's relocation within Okinawa have questioned this
statement of Foreign Minister Katsuya Okada on the possibility of
the Futenma Air Station remaining permanently, which contradicts
Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama's position that "(the Futenma base)
will not remain where it is," criticizing him for being
"backward-looking and incomprehensible." There is also criticism
that a minister's statement that contradicts the Prime Minister's
"is much more serious than disagreement within the cabinet."

Mayor Yoichi Iha (of Ginowan City) criticized Okada harshly: "Why
did he say something like that? Since Prime Minister Hatoyama has
said that Futenma will not remain where it is, such a
backward-looking stance is incomprehensible." Iha pointed out that
Okada's statements on Futenma relocation so far have often been
received unfavorably among the Okinawan people. He voiced his
objection, saying: "The Prime Minister's position is what counts, so
if he wants to make statements, he should support the Prime
Minister. He should be more careful with his words."

Naha City Mayor Takeshi Onaga, who co-chaired the "Okinawan people's
rally against the construction of a new military base in Henoko and
relocation within the prefecture" held last year, pointed out:
"Disagreement within the cabinet refers to differences in opinion
about details, but when a minister contradicts the Prime Minister's
statement, that is much more serious than disagreement within the
cabinet. This is unthinkable. What's wrong with the Hatoyama
cabinet?"

(2) Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary Matsuno also says continued use

TOKYO 00000209 002 OF 007


of Futenma base an option

SANKEI ONLINE (Full)
February 2, 2010

At a news conference on Feb. 2, Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary
Yorihisa Matsuno said with regard to the U.S. forces' Futenma Air
Station (in Ginowan City, Okinawa): "We are considering all options,
including the continued use of the Futenma base, without setting any
preconditions." He thus indicated that in case of failure to
identify a relocation site, it is possible that the Futenma base
will continue to be used.

Regarding the inspection of the candidate relocation sites by the
government and the ruling parties' Okinawa base issues examination
committee, which is looking into alternative relocation sites,
Matsuno said: "No formal decision has been made. However, I think it
would be good to visit various locations. If we do decide to make
inspection tours, they should take place as soon as possible."

In connection with this question, Prime Minister Yukio Hatoyama has
denied the possibility of continuing to use the Futenma base,
saying: "Basically, the Futenma base remaining in place is not an
option," but Foreign Minister Katsuya Okada remarked at a news
conference on Feb. 1: "If no alternative (relocation site) can be
found, it is possible that Futenma may remain where it is." The
Social Democratic Party and others have reacted strongly to this
statement.

(3) Popular will in Nago - Washington taking wait-and-see attitude
without making specific comments

OKINAWA TIMES (Page 2) (Full)
February 2, 2010

"A new element has surely been added now," Assistant Secretary of
State for East Asia and Pacific Affairs Kurt Campbell said in
response to the announcement of the outcome of the Nago mayoral
election on Jan. 25. All news agencies in Washington reported this
remark.

But a U.S. government official emphasized: "Our negotiating partner
is the Japanese government." Washington appears to be judging it
would be better not to aggressively refer to how the current plan to
relocate the U.S. Marine Corps' Futenma Air Station to Henoko could
be affected by the election of Susumu Inamine, who is opposed to the
existing plan.

In a regular press conference on Jan. 25, Assistant Secretary of
State Philip Crowley said: "There is no change (in the U.S.
government's policy). Prime Minister (Yukio) Hatoyama has officially
stated he will make a decision by the end of May. Work is still
under way." When asked," Aren't you really worried about the outcome
of the mayoral election?" he said: "That is a matter involving the
Japanese people." When asked the same thing again, he simply said:
"I have already replied to this question."

"It has become more difficult to make a prediction," a U.S.
government source said upon receiving the first report of Inamine's
victory.

On the day of the mayoral election on Jan. 25, Chief Cabinet

TOKYO 00000209 003 OF 007


Secretary Hirofumi Hirano said, "There is no reason why we have to
take (the outcome of the election) into account." This remark was
promptly reported to Washington.

A U.S. government source commented: "Japanese government officials
probably are taking the view that there is no need to persuade the
Nago mayor," but the source reportedly added: "Although the existing
plan is still on the table, we should not be optimistic."

Prime Minister Hatoyama said: "The government will look for
locations other than Henoko." Since then, U.S. officials have begun
to use this expression: "We expect the prime minister will come up
with an appropriate decision," while maintaining that the existing
plan is the best and only feasible option."

Campbell, who is currently visiting Japan to attend a high-level
meeting of the Security Subcommittee (SSC) composed of Japanese and
U.S. senior foreign and defense officials, said yesterday: "I would
like to hear views from ranking officials of the Japanese government
on what effect the outcome of the Nago mayoral election will have on
the procedures for conducting the environmental impact assessment."

U.S. Assistant Secretary of Defense Wallace Gregson emphasized in an
interview on Jan. 31 at the U.S. Consulate General's Official
Residence in Okinawa, located in Ginowan City: "I think attention
tends to be focused only on the Futenma issue, but the overall U.S.
force realignment plan includes a variety of elements."

Delivering a speech at Waseda University on Jan. 29, U.S. Ambassador
to Japan John Roos focused on the Marine Corps in Okinawa in
explaining the significance of the presence of U.S. forces in Japan.
According to informed sources, not only the State Department but
even the Defense Department and the White House had approved the
manuscript of the speech in advance. The Ambassador reiterated in
the speech: "If the Marines are moved out of Japan, the mobility of
the U.S. forces will be undermined." In this warning, the word
"Okinawa" was not included.

Ambassador Roos stressed: "Our efforts will not end with the return
of the Futenma airfield to Japan. We would like to continue to
grapple with the noise and environmental issues and cooperate in
promoting Okinawa's economic development." His willingness to
implement the existing plan even while expanding the range of
options could also be seen in this speech.

(4) Public prosecutors question Ozawa again: Tension and dismay in
DPJ

YOMIURI (Page 2) (Full)
February 2, 2010

It was learned that Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) Secretary
General Ozawa was questioned again by the special investigation
squad of the Tokyo District over a case involving his political fund
management organization. The revelation gave rise to tension and
dismay in the government and the DPJ, with one member speculating,
"Public prosecutors are determined to settle the case promptly."
With Ozawa, the most influential figure in the ruling parties,
hinting at a possibility of considering stepping down as secretary
general in the event that public prosecutors press criminal charges
against him, a sense of crisis that this case could rock the
foundation of the administration is spreading.

TOKYO 00000209 004 OF 007

Many DPJ members are alarmed by the fact that Ozawa was questioned
again by public prosecutors, with a senior member saying: "The
investigation into the possible involvement of Mr. Ozawa in the case
is in its final stage. The possibility of their building a case
against him seems to be getting stronger."

Ozawa on the afternoon of the 1st met with Muneo Suzuki, the head of
the New Party Daichi, in the Diet building. According to Suzuki,
Ozawa said that things will settle down in time and showed eagerness
to work hard to prepare for the upcoming Upper House election this
summer.

Ozawa's reference to his resignation has caused major repercussions
in the party. Foreign Minister Okada on the Feb. 1 apparently said
with a puzzled look, "It is not necessarily clear what sort of
situation (that Ozawa was talking about) he would be held criminally
responsible for. I would like to refrain from commenting at this
point."

Many DPJ members are growing pessimistic, with one saying, "He
should be reprimanded in some way, because he was questioned twice.
Comparing with the time when he declared that he would fight against
public prosecutors, his voice has now lost forcefulness and his face
has lost its expression of resolve. He has been mentally driven into
a corner. He has lost confidence."

In the meantime, others take the view that Ozawa has taken a
precaution against the possibility of Tomohiro Ishikawa, a suspect
(in the case of the false political fund report by Rikuzan-kai)
being indicted and voices calling for Ozawa's resignation growing,
making it clear that even if Ishikawa is indicted, he will not
resign unless he himself is indicted or arrested.

Many are concerned about the possible impact of the scandal on the
administration. Chief Cabinet Secretary Hirano stopped short of
making any comment on Ozawa's statement. He simply said, "No
comment." However, a government source was apparently concerned,
noting, "If the question of whether or not Ozawa should resign comes
under close scrutiny, the DPJ could split between the pro-Ozawa
group and the anti-Ozawa group. If the secretary general actually
steps down, the government and the ruling camp will lose their
control tower. The management of the administration is bound to fall
into chaos."

(5) Editorial: Japan-China joint study - Differences evident in
historical views

YOMIURI (Page 3) (Full)
February 2, 2010

Each ethnic group or nation has its own views on history.

It would be extremely difficult for Japan to share the same
historical views as China, in which the interpretation of history is
carried out under communist ideology and academic freedom is
restricted.

A report released by the Japan-China joint history research panel
comprising academics from the two countries has revealed major
differences in their views on history.


TOKYO 00000209 005 OF 007


The report covered ancient, medieval, and modern history and
included the views of the Japanese and Chinese academics.

For instance, with regard to the number of people killed in the 1937
Nanjing Massacre, the Japanese side pointed out various estimates
such as 40,000 and 20,000, with an upper limit of 200,000.

However, the Chinese side insisted that 300,000 people were killed,
which is the Chinese Communist Party's official view. Based on
empirical research, this figure is unrealistic.

In connection with the Sino-Japanese War, although the Japanese side
pointed out that Japan did not plan an invasion, the Chinese side
concluded that it was an all-out aggressive war.

The Chinese side referred to the possibility that the Marco Polo
Bridge Incident may have occurred accidentally. This is probably the
only sign of change in the Chinese side.

The postwar history section of the report, which attention was
focused on, was not disclosed at the request of the Chinese side.
This was because the Japanese side's assessment of the 1989
Tiananmen Square incident could lead to criticism of the present
Chinese government.

In China, NHK overseas service, which reported on the joint study
report, was suspended in the middle of the broadcast. Chinese
authorities were apparently trying to prevent the footage of the
Tiananmen Square incident from being broadcast.

In light of this situation in which the freedom of the press is
restricted, there were probably limits to flexible discussions on
history.

In 2006 then Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and President Hu Jintao
decided on the launch of the Japan-China joint history research
panel. The aim was to leave discussion on the historical issue to
academics, separate from the realm of politicians.

Unfortunately the academics failed to deepen the empirical
discussions as hoped for due to the Chinese government's
restrictions.

However, it can be said that it was meaningful to a certain extent
that the academics representing the two counties discussed important
issues and released the report.

It has been decided that the panel members will be shuffled and new
members will continue to carry out the second round of study of
history.

The fact that it is difficult for Japan and China to share the same
views on history is understandable. In order to deepen the strategic
reciprocal relationship between the two countries, Tokyo and Beijing
will need to continue to hold calm and empirical discussions.

(6) Parents and children after divorce (Part 4): Parents should
consider the emotional burden on the child before reaching a
decision to divorce

YOMIURI (Page 19) (Full)
January 29, 2010

TOKYO 00000209 006 OF 007

Yoshiko Kosaka

Divorce has a tremendous impact on a child's mind. To what degree
are the adults aware of that?

The parents of Ayumu Mitsumoto, 21, who runs a cram school in
Shizuoka Prefecture, divorced when she was in junior high school.
Mitsumoto vividly remembers the day she abruptly left the house with
her father.

She was neither able to take part in the overnight school trip the
following day nor say goodbye to her friends. "The divorce made me
sad, but that made me even sadder," Mitsumoto said looking back on
those days. She has kept such a feeling deep inside her heart. "I
knew that my parents could not think of such a thing."

A new life began with her father in a strange town, and she became
not able to contact her mother. But when she was in high school,
Mitsumoto abruptly heard from her mother. Mitsumoto, who was also
worried about her future, got on a night bus to see her mother
without telling her father. It was an eight-hour bus ride. "Our
conversation was not exactly lively, but I was happy to see my
mother. I had been tearful when I moved out of the house, but I was
able to say goodbye to my mother with a smile."

Becoming acquainted with Asuna Shinkawa, 22, whose parents also
divorced, Mitsumoto has begun conveying "children's true feelings"
to the public via her blog this year.

Shinkawa is a director of "Wink," an NPO (in Tokyo) supporting
mother-child families. Through her activities that involved contacts
with many divorced parents, Shinkawa has become aware of the reality
that children are at the mercy of the selfishness of the parents.
She is now driven by an urge to let people know about the "feelings
hidden deep inside the children's hearts."

Shinkawa met Mitsumoto when she was searching an Internet community
site for someone to work with her. The two separately conduct
interviews with children of broken homes to publish them on their
blog.

There had been people with broken families among Mitsumoto's circle
of acquaintances but she and they were always careful not to touch
on their experiences. As she has begun talking about her experience
after meeting Shinkawa, Mitsumoto has realized that she is now able
to face up to her parents' divorce and that she is changing. She is
also driven by a desire to convey children's real feelings to
parents who do not know those feelings.

"Divorce hurts the child, and the child keeps the feeling of hurt to
themselves without telling of the pain to their parents," explained
Kobe Shinwa Women's University Prof. Kazuyo Tanase, who is also a
clinical psychotherapist. "For the sake of the child, the
relationship with one parent must not be severed completely."

Children who grew up with no contact with one parent tend to blame
themselves, thinking they are responsible for their parents'
divorce. "For the growth of the child," says Tanase, "it is
significant to know what a parent who lives separately is like even
if her or she is not a good parent."


TOKYO 00000209 007 OF 007


In Japan, a couple can get a divorce by just filing a divorce notice
with the appropriate office without discussing the rearing of
children. Tanase sounded a note of caution about the current
situation: "Even if divorce is unavoidable, the parents must do so
after fully discussing their children's future.

Annually some 240,000 children experience the divorce of their
parents. The government is required to think what is best for
children in a weak position and to review the current child custody
system and child visitations. (This concludes the series.)

ROOS

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