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U.S and British warplanes launch a new aggression

The U.S and British warplanes launch a new aggression over Iraqi civil areas

Baghdad, Sept. 19, INA

The U.S. and British warplanes violated Iraq’s airspace in a desperate bid to impair solid will of Iraqis and undermine their sovereignty and territorial integrity.

A spokesman for the air defence command told INA that on Wednesday the U.S. and British warplanes violated Iraq‘s airspace coming from their bases in Kuwait backed by an AWACS inside their bases in Saudi Arabia.

He added that the enemy ravens carried out 41 armed sorties and patrolled civil areas in Artawi, Al- Jiliba, As-Selman, Al- Nasiriya,

Kalat Suker, Al- Diwaniya, Al- Simawa, Najaf, Al-Hashimiya,

Al- Akheider, Al- Imara and Ali Al-Gharbi.

Iraq’s defence units repulsed the enemy planes and forced them to retreat to their bases in Kuwait, he further added.

He went on to say that on the same day other formations violated Iraq’s airspace coming from their bases in Turkey and these formations were supported by an AWACS inside the Turkish airspace.

The formations carried out 14 sorties over areas of Zakho, Al-Umadiya, Duhok, Akra, Mosul, Erbil, and Rawandoz, the spokesman added.

‘’Iraq’s defence units repulsed the enemy planes and forced them to retreat to their bases of evil inside the Turkish lands’’ he said.

The total number of the armed sorties launched by the U.S and British warplanes against Iraq coming from bases in Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and Turkey since dec. 17, 1998 till now reached 42680, the spokesman concluded.

ENDS

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