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Greenpeace Tackles Climate Change In Egypt

Greenpeace Tackles Climate Change In Egypt

Cairo, Egypt - Greenpeace today reached Egypt on the final leg of its 'Peaceful Energy Tour' in the Mediterranean region. Campaigners will be visiting Cairo and Alexandria to highlight the threats and impacts of climate change in Egypt.

"As the leader in renewable energy in Africa and the Arab world, Egypt is crucial in alleviating the impacts of climate change. The main cause of climate change is our use of fossil fuels as a source of energy; a switch to clean sources of renewable energy such as wind, solar and modern biomass, offers the promise of a sustainable future," said Wael Hmaidan, Greenpeace Mediterranean campaigner.

Egypt is also one of the major countries, which will suffer dramatic climate change impacts in the region, specifically the Nile delta, which is crucial to the survival of the country's people and their economy.

"Egypt is more than 95% desert, and all of its economy, agriculture and population is concentrated along the lower Nile. If the Nile recedes, Egypt would suffer dramatic losses," Hmaidan explained.

Climate scientists have warned that the Nile not only could suffer a decrease in water flow of up to 75% by the end of the century, but also a rise in sea levels would threaten to flood around 20% of the Nile delta. With further threats from increasing desertification, between two and fourteen million people could become refugees due to the environmental damage.

Greenpeace is calling on the Egyptian Government to push the leaders of the region and the world to adopt serious renewable energy commitments if they want their country to survive. The solar resources in Egypt alone are enough to power the Mediterranean region, Europe, and Africa combined.

"Although climate change impacts us all, the major victims are in developing countries where the economies and infrastructures are fragile. We have so far been disappointed by developed countries that are refusing to combat climate change effectively, such as the United States and Australia," said Bruno Rebelle, Greenpeace International program director.

Greenpeace is planning a week of engagements to discuss the issues with politicians, farmers and supporters, who can visit an exhibition in Cairo and Alexandria on the impacts of climate change.

Greenpeace is an independent, campaigning organization, which uses non-violent, creative communication tools to put the spotlight on global environmental problems, and to drive towards solutions essential for a green and peaceful future.

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