Scoop has an Ethical Paywall
Work smarter with a Pro licence Learn More

World Video | Defence | Foreign Affairs | Natural Events | Trade | NZ in World News | NZ National News Video | NZ Regional News | Search

 

Demobilization Process Begins In North Darfur

UN-Backed Demobilization Process Begins In North Darfur

New York, Nov 23 2009 12:10PM Over 150 ex-combatants who once fought for armed militia in Sudan’s war-torn Darfur region participated today in a United Nations-backed demobilization and reintegration programme which aims to ease the return of former soldiers to their communities.

The three-day scheme, supported by the joint UN-African Union peacekeeping mission to Darfur (UNAMID) and the Sudanese Government, is expected to register more than 400 ex-combatants in the North Darfur capital of El Fasher before moving onto West and South Darfur.

The process involves briefings on what to expect during reintegration, verification of administrative documents, medical and disability screening, fingerprinting, and the provision of identification cards.

Participants are also given a cash payment in local currency of $150 and after two months they receive food vouchers in addition to other basic amenities.

Since fighting erupted in 2003, pitting Government forces and allied Janjaweed militiamen against rebel groups, some 300,000 people have been killed and an estimated 2.7 million others displaced from their homes in Darfur.

The disarmament, demobilization and reintegration (DDR) programme is part of the final security arrangement of the 2006 Darfur Peace Agreement, which paved the way for the deployment of UNAMID at the start of last year.

ENDS

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading

Are you getting our free newsletter?

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.

© Scoop Media

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading
 
 
 
World Headlines

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Join Our Free Newsletter

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.