Top Scoops

Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

Mosque victims spend 19,500 hours in hospital, 3000 in ICU

Mosque victims spend 19,500 hours in hospital, 3000 in ICU

From Checkpoint, 5:23 pm on 10 June 2019

Logan Church , South Island Checkpoint Reporter

Listen duration 4:17

Click a link to play audio (or right-click to download) in either
MP3 format or in OGG format.

Up to 15 people injured in the mosque shootings will need to have ongoing surgery for years, Canterbury DHB (CDHB) says.

It has been almost three months since the attacks in Christchurch and so far nearly 120 people have been treated for their injuries.

The ongoing surgeries are not only having a huge impact on the lives of the victims but are placing a strain on the hospital system itself.

Temel Atacocugu was shot nine times at Al Noor Mosque on 15 March - making it impossible for him to walk or move easily.

While he has recovered from initial surgery which enabled him to get out and about again, he has returned to Burwood Hospital for a bone graft.

"This time [it's] for my left arm, which has a missing piece of bone," he told Checkpoint from his hospital bed.

Temel Atacocugu is one of those receiving ongoing treatment after he was shot nine times in the Christchurch mosque attacks earlier this year. Photo: RNZ / Logan Church

Bone was harvested from his left hip to replace the missing piece of bone in his left arm.

But Mr Atacocugu was only one of many requiring ongoing surgery.

"Of the patients we've had out in the community there are quite a number of them which have had ... damage control procedures," CDHB chief of surgeries Greg Robertson said.

"We would estimate that there are 10 to 15 people who will require further surgical intervention over the years," he said.

Canterbury District Health Board chief of surgeries Greg Robertson.
Photo: RNZ / Simon Rogers

CDHB also released figures to Checkpoint which revealed the sheer number of hours hospital staff had spent in response to the mosque attacks.

Aside from the initial 48 patients who arrived at the emergency department on the day, CDHB said another 70 patients arrived with minor injuries in the following weeks.

Since the attacks, 88 operations had been performed with 51 of these during the first weekend.

All victims have spent a combined 19,566 hours in hospital wards, plus 3123 hours in ICU.

One person remains in Burwood Hospital permanently - but in a stable condition.

Mr Robertson said hundreds of unrelated surgeries had been deferred since the attacks, but it was now "business as usual".


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On The Saudi Oil Refinery Crisis

So the US and the Saudis claim to have credible evidence that those Weapons of Oil Destruction came from Iran, their current bogey now that Saddam Hussein is no longer available. Evidently, the world has learned nothing from the invasion of Iraq in 2003 when dodgy US intel was wheeled out to justify the invasion of Iraq, thereby giving birth to ISIS and causing the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people. More>>

ALSO:

Veronika Meduna on The Dig: Kaitiakitanga - Seeing Nature As Your Elder

The intricate interconnections between climate change and biodiversity loss, and how this disruption impacts Māori in particular. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On China And Hong Kong (And Boris)

In the circumstances, yesterday’s move by Lam to scrap – rather than merely suspend – the hated extradition law that first triggered the protests three months ago, seems like the least she can do. It may also be too little, too late. More>>

ALSO:

Dave Hansford on The Dig: Whose Biodiversity Is It Anyway?

The DOC-led draft Biodiversity Strategy seeks a “shared vision.” But there are more values and views around wildlife than there are species. How can we hope to agree on the shape of Aotearoa’s future biota? More>>

ALSO:

There Is A Field: Reimagining Biodiversity In Aotearoa

We are in a moment of existential peril, with interconnected climate and biodiversity crises converging on a global scale to drive most life on Earth to the brink of extinction… These massive challenges can, however, be reframed as a once in a lifetime opportunity to fundamentally change how humanity relates to nature and to each other. Read on The Dig>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog