World Video | Defence | Foreign Affairs | Natural Events | Trade | NZ in World News | NZ National News Video | NZ Regional News | Search

 


Southeast Asia: Drug-resistant malaria spread

Drug-resistant malaria has spread to critical border regions of Southeast Asia

31 July 2014

Bangkok: Drug-resistant malaria parasites have spread to critical border regions of Southeast Asia, seriously threatening global malaria control and elimination programmes, according to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The study confirms that resistance to the world’s most effective antimalarial drug, artemisinin, is now widespread in Southeast Asia. This is not the first, or even the second time the malaria parasite has developed resistance to front line drugs, and each time resistance has emerged from the same corner of Asia on the Cambodia-Thailand border.

The study, which analysed blood samples from 1241 malaria patients in 10 countries across Asia and Africa, found that artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum - the most deadly form of malaria-causing parasite – is now firmly established in Western Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, Eastern Myanmar and Northern Cambodia. There are also signs of emerging resistance in Central Myanmar, Southern Laos and Northeastern Cambodia.

Reassuringly, there are no signs of resistance in the three African sites included in the study, located in Kenya, Nigeria and Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The study also suggests that extending the course of antimalarial treatment in areas with established resistance – for six days rather than the standard three days – could offer a temporary solution to this worsening problem.

“It may still be possible to prevent the spread of artemisinin resistant malaria parasites across Asia and then to Africa by eliminating them, but that window of opportunity is closing fast.Conventional malaria control approaches won’t be enough – we will need to take more radical action and make this a global public health priority, without delay," said Professor Nicholas White, senior author of the study and Chairman of the Welcome Trust-funded Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU), Professor of Tropical Medicine at the University of Oxford, and Chair of the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network.

The study was conducted by the Tracking Resistance to Artemisinin Collaboration (TRAC) which enrolled infected adults and children at 15 trial sites in 10 malaria-endemic countries between May 2011 and April 2013. The TRAC partners examined the different responses in malaria infected patients to artemisinin treatment. Patients received a six-day antimalarial treatment, three days of an artemisinin derivative and a three day course of artemesinin combination treatment (ACT). Patients’ blood was analysed to measure the ‘parasite clearance half-life’ or rate at which the parasites are cleared from a patient’s blood.

Results showed that the median parasite clearance half-life ranged from 1.8 hours in the Democratic Republic of the Congo to 7 hours at the Thailand-Cambodia border, where artemisinin resistance has been known aboutsince 2005. The proportion of patients with parasites in their blood 72 hours after treatment, a widely used test for artemisinin resistance, ranged from 0% in Kenya to 68% in Eastern Thailand. Malaria infections that were slow to clear were also strongly associated with a single point mutation in a P. falciparum gene called kelch 13, an important validation of the recently discovered genetic marker (k13) in the DNA of the malaria parasite.

Researchers also found that patients who had slow clearing infections were also more likely to have parasite stages which can infect mosquitoes. This suggests that artemisinin-resistant P. falciparum parasites have a transmission advantage over parasites that are not resistant, which drives their spread.

“Frontline ACTs are still very effective at curing the majority of patients. But we need to be vigilant as cure rates have fallen in areas where artemisinin resistance is established,” said Dr Elizabeth Ashley, lead scientist of the TRAC study and Clinical Researcher at the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Medicine Research Unit (MORU), University of Oxford. “Action is needed to prevent the spread of resistance from Myanmar into neighbouring Bangladesh and India.”

Dr Jeremy Farrar, Director of the Wellcome Trust says: “If resistance spreads out of Asia and into Africa much of the great progress in reducing deaths from malaria will be reversed. Our ability to respond to these rapidly emerging health problems depends on swift gathering of evidence, which can be quickly translated into public health and clinical interventions that are then implemented. Antimicrobial resistance is happening now. This is not just a threat for the future, it is today's reality.”

Currently over half of the world’spopulation are at risk of malaria infection. Although there has been a substantial reduction in the number of people falling ill and dying from malaria – with approximately 3.3 million deaths prevented since 2000 – it is estimated that more than 600,000 people still die from the disease each year, most of them children under five years of age living in Africa.1

While new antimalarial medicines are indevelopment, and another paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine has shown some promising trial results for a potential new antimalarial drug in development at Novartis, they are unlikely to be available for widespread distribution for several years.

“The artemisinin drugs are arguably the best antimalarials we have ever had. We need to conserve them in areas where they are still working well,” concluded Dr Ashley.

Publication details: Elizabeth A Ashley et al. Spread of Artemisinin Resistance in Plasmodium falciparum Malaria. Advanced online publication in New England Journal of Medicine. July 31 2014; 371:411-23. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1314981.

Notes to editors

•From the late 1950s to the 1970s chloroquine resistant malaria parasites spread across Asia to Africa, resulting in a resurgence of malaria infections and millions of deaths. Chloroquine was replaced by sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), but resistance to SP also emerged in Western Cambodia and spread to Africa. SP was replaced by ACTs, and now we face the prospect of history repeating itself for a third time.

•Artemisinin is the most effective drug against malaria. Artemisinin derivatives, such as artesunate, have several advantages over other antimalarial drugs such as chloroquine and mefloquine: the artemisinin derivatives act more rapidly and they have fewer side-effects. Although artemisinin derivatives can be used on their own - as a monotherapy - fears about the possible development of resistance led to recommendations that they should only be used in conjunction with one or more other drugs - as artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs).

•ACTs are now recommended by the World Health Organization as the firstline treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria, and they have contributed substantially to the recent decline in malaria cases in most tropical endemic regions.

•Some of key drivers of resistance in the malaria parasites are counterfeit or substandard treatments, unregulated antimalarial drug use, using artemisinin without a partner antimalarial as part of a combination treatment, and the unusual genetic structure of malaria parasites in Western Cambodia.

•The presence of kelch 13 mutations was strongly associated with a delayed parasite clearance from the patient’s system during treatment, and thus has been confirmed as a reliable marker of resistance. This will facilitate surveillance efforts going forward.

•Patients with slower parasite clearance are more likely to transmit their drug resistant strain to others.

•Treatment failure rates with artesunate-mefloquine in Thailand and with DHA-piperaquine in Cambodia have now risen more than fivefold.

•1 Malaria burden estimates from the WHO World Malaria Report 2013.

Funding
The TRAC project was funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID). Additional support was given by the Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN), the Intramural Research Program of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The study was coordinated by MORU, the Mahidol Oxford Research Programme funded by the Wellcome Trust.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
World Headlines

 

Gaza: Pledges For Aid, Reconstruction Must Be Honoured

Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (left) addresses the Security Council meeting on the situation in the Middle East, including the Palestinian question. Security Council President for the month of October, María Cristina Perceval of Argentina, is at ... More>>

Ebola: UN Prepares For Arrival Of Trial Vaccines

In early October 2014, with the help of the US Navy, a new mobile laboratory opened at Island Clinic, one of the WHO-supported Ebola Treatment Units (ETU) in Monrovia, Liberia. Photo: WHO/R. Sørenson More>>

Palestine: Human Rights Defender Abdallah Abu Rahmah Found Guilty

Human Rights Defender Abdallah Abu Rahma was found guilty by an Israeli military court of “disturbing a soldier”. More>>

NCRI: Iran: 13 Executions In One Day

The henchmen of the clerical regime hanged 13 prisoners on Sunday October 19, 2014 in Ghezel-Hessar Karaj Prison, Tabriz Central Prison and Rasht Central Prison. More>>


MSF: Ebola Crisis Update - 16th October 2014

16 October 2014 Cases Deaths Guinea 1,472 843 Liberia 4,249 2,458 Nigeria 20 8 Sierra Leone 3,252 1,183 Senegal 1 0 Total 8,994 4,492 WHO Figures - Data are based on official information reported by Ministries of Health. These numbers are subject to change ... More>>

ALSO:

Detroit: City-Backed Water Shut-Offs Contrary To Human Rights

20 October 2014 – The city of Detroit must restore access to water for its citizens who remain unable to pay their bills, two United Nations experts urged today, adding that a failure to do so would be a violation of the most basic human rights of those ... More>>

ALSO:

DR Congo: Head Of UN Mission Condemns Deadly Rebel Attacks

A MONUSCO APC is greeted by FARDC soldiers on their way back from the front line in the Beni region of the DRC where the UN is backing the FARDC in an operation against ADF militia. Photo: MONUSCO/Sylvain Liechti More>>

UNESCO Chief Denounces Killing Of Cambodian Journalist

17 October 2014 – The head of the United Nations agency tasked with defending press freedom today denounced the killing of a Cambodian reporter shot while investigating illegal logging in the eastern part of the country. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
World
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news