Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 

Waitangi Tribunal asked to review Auckland SHA

SOUL Press Release, 14 December 2015: Waitangi Tribunal asked to review Auckland SHA

An application for an urgent inquiry into the Special Housing Area (SHA) at Ihumātao, Māngere and into the Special Housing Area Act itself was filed with the Waitangi Tribunal week.

SOUL’s Counsel Cameron Hockly advised today that the Tribunal have registered the claim as Wai 2547 and the Crown now has until 11 January 2016 to respond.

The application is believed to be the first legal challenge to the SHA legislation through the Waitangi Tribunal and was filed by founding members of the SOUL campaign who whakapapa to the area, to Makaurau Marae and to Ngāti Te Ahiwaru.

Save Our Unique Landscape (SOUL) is a campaign group fighting to stop a 480-­unit housing development on a block of unique, rural land adjacent to the Māori village at Ihumātao and to the Ōtuataua Stonefields Historic Reserve.

The land was granted Special Housing Area status in 2014.

On land designated as Special Housing Areas, housing developments can be fast tracked without public consultation and without full RMA environmental protections.

There is no requirement to consult with Māori.

SOUL has provided evidence to the Waitangi Tribunal that this breaches the partnership stipulated in the Treaty.

The SOUL application asks the Tribunal to consider that the Special Housing Areas Act breaches the Treaty of Waitangi for the following reasons:

The SHA was created without proper consultation with the tangata whenua of Ihumātao

There has been no provision for the protection of sacred sites and other taonga associated with the land at Ihumātao

The development will undermine the guardianship or kaitiaki role of the Ihumātao residents in relation to the land The historical and cultural importance of Ihumātao has been widely recognised by Māori, Pākeha, archaeologists and historians.

The land in question was wrongfully confiscated in 1863 as punishment of local Māori for their involvement in the Kīngitanga movement.

The Māori King Movement or Kīngitanga arose among some of the Māori tribes of New Zealand in the central North Island in the 1850s, to establish a role similar in status to that of the monarch of the British colonists, as a way of halting the alienation of Māori land.

Since confiscation, the land remained in the ownership of the Wallace family until the recent conditional sale to Fletcher Residential.

However, the local iwi maintain strong links to the land, including kaitiakitanga and mana whenua status, and they make up the majority of Ihumātao, the village of 87 dwellings adjacent to the farm that is the contested site of SHA 62.

The historic Waitangi Tribunal report on the Manukau Harbour was heard at Makaurau Marae in 1985.

At that time the Tribunal commented, “We are frankly appalled by the events of the past and by the effect they have had on the Manukau tribes."

Many of the recommendations of that report Tribunal are still to be implemented.

The Housing Accords and Special Housing Areas Act was developed under budget secrecy rules with no consultation with any affected parties outside Government.

It was passed under urgency.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Whakaari/White Island: A Minute’s Silence For Victims

A minute’s silence will be observed at 2.11pm on Monday 16 December in honour of the victims of the Whakaari White Island eruption, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has confirmed...

The minute’s silence will be exactly one week after the eruption started on Monday 9 December. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On What An Inquiry Might Look Like
Presumably, if there is to be a ministerial inquiry (at the very least) into the Whakaari/White Island disaster, it will need to be a joint ministerial inquiry. That’s because the relevant areas of responsibility seem to be so deeply interwoven... More>>

 

More Discussions: National On Housing, Transport And Infrastructure

National has today released the ninth and tenth in our series of discussion documents, which contain a range of proposals to ensure New Zealand has the high-quality housing and infrastructure it needs to prosper, Leader of the Opposition Simon Bridges says. More>>

ALSO:

Trains: Govt's Plans For Rail

The Government has released its long term vision for a sustainable 21st Century rail network that gets our cities moving, connects our regions and gets more freight off the roads. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Welfare Vs Infrastructure Spending

If New Zealand has a pressing need to stimulate its flagging economy, it seems very weird that the government is choosing a $12 billion package of infrastructure spending – mainly on road and rail – that by definition, will take a very long time to deliver their stimulatory benefits ... More>>

New Reports: "Immediate Commitment To Doing Justice Differently"

Justice Minister Andrew Little released two reports today, Turuki! Turuki! from Te Uepū Hāpai I te Ora, and Te Tangi o te Manawanui: Recommendations for Reform from the Chief Victims Advisor. Both recommend a fresh approach to the way criminal justice has been approached... More>>

ALSO:

"Heart-Breaking And Confronting": Surgical Mesh Restorative Justice Report

Minister Genter: “People have talked about losing the life they had enjoyed before surgical mesh harmed them – the loss of a steady job, the ability to exercise, a loving relationship in some cases. Others described the chronic pain they experienced..." More>>

ALSO:

Law Foundation: Government Decryption Powers Must Respect Privacy

The power of government to order users and companies to decrypt encrypted data and devices needs stronger privacy protections and additional safeguards, according to a study published by researchers at the University of Waikato. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 


 

InfoPages News Channels