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Keeping the foot on the pedal for Multiple Sclerosis

Media Release – For Immediate Release – 3 September 2015

Keeping the foot on the pedal for Multiple Sclerosis

Adam Muir is your average kiwi bloke, an upbeat family man, outgoing and mad about cars, muscle cars to be precise. However there is one little devil sitting on Adam’s shoulder, his constant companion, Multiple Sclerosis.

“I’m a newbie to the world of MS,” explains Adam. “Actually it was two blows in one.” Adam was diagnosed with MS in April 2013 while undergoing treatment for cancer of the saliva glands which involved removing a large part of the bottom of his mouth and part of his tongue - an operation which has left him with a speech impairment. For most people that would be a fair share of bad luck however Shelley, Adam’s beloved wife of 7 years, was fighting her own battle with brain cancer, a battle she sadly lost in March 2014, leaving Adam to raise their two young boys.

Like many Adam admits to being in denial about his Multiple Sclerosis. “I try not to let things get me down. This is one more knock and challenge for us to get through.” Those who know Adam would describe him as the most upbeat person they know with an unwavering optimism.

Despite all the knocks in his life Adam focusses his energy on how he can help others. In November 2013 Adam organised the first, of the now annual `Kawhia Cruise’ MS fundraiser for his local MS Society, MS Waikato. “I just want to raise the awareness of MS, to get some funding to go towards researching the disease, but also to support MS Waikato first in helping others with the condition,” explained Adam. That’s the reason and the method is because he’s a car nut. “I was a rally driver for 20 years but had to give it up when the MS symptoms started to show themselves and he had trouble coordinating his feet. Known as `Sainzy’ (after Spanish rally driver Carlos Sainz) Adam has rallied all over New Zealand. “I’m not new to raising funds – rallying is an expensive sport” he quips. Not one to do things by halves Adam drove his 1969 Chevrolet Malibu in the 2013 ‘Cruise’ and wife Shelley’s 1955 Chevy freshly painted in MS orange was driven by her parents.

“Adam is an incredible person and we are so grateful for all his support,” explained MS Waikato Admin Manager Janet Buckingham. “Despite everything that has happened in Adam’s life he puts others before himself. By supporting us to raise awareness and funds we are able to help more people just like Adam who are living with Multiple Sclerosis.”

“Having the support of my family and MS Waikato is what has helped me to be where I am today,” commented Adam.

Multiple Sclerosis is a chronic neurological condition which affects the central nervous system. Over 4000 New Zealanders are diagnosed with MS for which there is no known cause or cure, yet. Research advancements are constantly being made. MS New Zealand and its 18 societies across the country work to provide information, support and advocacy for people living with MS, helping to provide them with the tools to empower themselves to live well with the condition.

MS Awareness Week takes place this week. Please consider supporting MS Organisations to provide support and services to those affected by donating to the regional street collectors or online at www.msnz.org.nz. Or Vodafone customers can Txt2Give, simply txt MSNZ to 7003 to donate $3, 7005 ($5) and 7010 ($10).

END

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