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Dangerous Decibles training course a smash


Auckland 9 September 2019: Dangerous Decibels training is back, and will enable the 16 Dangerous Decibels Educators to run training in colleges, schools and kindergartens on the dangers of excess noise, the irrevocable damage to hearing it can cause, and on how to protect yourself and your hearing health. More importantly, according to Dr David Welch, both the course and the ultimate experience in classes around the country is designed to be fun.

“It’s the fun and interaction that excites the imagination and creates deeper learning that can stay with children over time”, according to Dr Welch. “It’s the fun and deep understanding that changes behaviours”.

The Dangerous Decibels (or DD) course is a joint venture between Auckland University and Hearing New Zealand. DD was originally created by a number of North American Universities and has been developed further in New Zealand and Singapore. The sixteen attendees on the two-day course are drawn from Hearing New Zealand affiliated members throughout the country. The DD team involves experts in Audiology, Health and Safety, Auditory Physiology, and Health Promotion, and Carolynne Riley, from Hearing NZ who may well be the world’s most experienced DD Educator: she has taught approximately 19,000 people.

Carolynne Riley not only works as a Hearing Educator at Hearing Hastings but is the Frontline staff representative on the National Board at Hearing NZ. Carolynne believes “education is the direction we need to go in to reduce the incidence of noise induced hearing loss (NIHL). NIHL is easily preventable; the DD training delivers this message in an interactive and memorable way. Our hearing is precious but when it's gone, it's gone, it doesn’t come back!”


Students discover just how important it can be to “Turn it Down!”, “Walk Away” and how to “Protect Ears”. With the help of scientific tools, students measure sound and learn about decibels. They explore sound, the way it travels, and how they can protect their hearing for years to come!

One attendee, Tracey Jones commented that “The Dangerous Decibels training programme is a valuable tool to have, it helps us to educate people (young and old) to protect their hearing because once it’s gone it won’t come back.”

“Following the dangerous decibels course Kate now feels she has the tools and knowledge to match her passion for spreading the message about protecting our hearing.”

“We are heading towards more than one in five kiwis having often preventable hearing loss due to noise, particularly from such activities as extra loud music players, concerts and music, particularly when delivered through head phones and ear buds from YouTube and Bluetooth.” Rush says.

Noise induced hearing loss can be prevented. Bring the Dangerous Decibels Training to your classroom by getting in contact with your local Hearing New Zealand branch. Visit www.hearing.org.nz for more information and contact details.

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