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Before you get excited about 5G fixed wireless broadband…

Vodafone's 5G network is about to launch. Soon you'll see marketing for 5G fixed wireless broadband marketing. Spark will no doubt follow.


Let's step back for a moment and take a reality check.


There's a lot to be said for 5G. It's fast, energy efficient and has low latency. Carriers can pack in many more connections per square kilometre.


Most of the benefits of 5G will go to industrial users and to organisations that can make use of network slicing. That's the ability to set aside bandwidth for private use. The other main beneficiaries will be the cellular companies who can sell more connections and cut running costs.


Machine to machine 5G


5G is ideal when machines talk to machine. It will make the internet-of-things sing and dance.


Yet it isn't always the best broadband product for residential users. Many people will be better off sticking with wired connections.


In theory 5G can deliver fibre-like speeds. Overseas users see 300mbps or even a little higher. This is plenty for streaming video and other high bandwidth applications, but not enough if you have a digital household with many people sharing the same connection.


There's another catch. Wireless connections are nothing like as reliable as fibre. If you need a consistent connection, say you have a monitoring application, you'll soon run up against limitations. There are also stories of Netflix buffering like crazy in prime time when everyone on a tower goes online.


Line of sight


One other point, 5G is a line-of-sight service. There are nuances, but in general you need to see the cell tower to use it. In some cases overseas a connection that works fine in winter can stop working when there are leaves on the trees if those trees are in the wrong place.


You should consider 5G fixed wireless if:



  • You live near a 5G tower and can't get fibre. You may be down a right of way or in an apartment where people are bloody-minded about running cable to your place.

  • You are off the fibre map1.

  • You have light broadband needs, don't need a lot of bandwidth and reliability isn't essential. Your home will struggle to run multiple streaming video sessions or handle big downloads at the same time.

  • The address isn't permanent. Students and other short term residents might prefer a connection that can be up in seconds and taken with you when you leave.

  • You live in shared house and a shared broadband account is too hard to organise.


The irony is the New Zealanders who would most benefit from 5G fixed wireless broadband, that's the people living on low density fringe areas and lifestyle blocks not served by fibre, are unlikely to get it early. They may get 5G later, but don't hold your breath.





  1. Although, for now, that probably also means you off the 5G fixed wireless map


Before you get excited about 5G fixed wireless broadband… was first posted at billbennett.co.nz.

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