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ChromeOS: Google’s stumbling surveillance capitalism ecosyst

"Anyone saying that Android apps on ChromeOS are a good experience is delusional."

Google PixelbookIn Chrome OS has stalled out, Dave Ruddock says Google's Chrome OS has failed to live up to its potential. Ruddock is a Chrome user who says he does 95 percent of his work using the operating system.

When Chrome OS first appeared it looked like the future. Or at least one version of a potential future.

It's a great idea on paper.

Take a minimal specification computer. One that costs almost nothing to make and almost everyone can afford. Give it just enough hardware to connect to the net and handle a web browser.

Cloud power


Then let efficient remote cloud systems do all the heavy lifting. After all, that's what most people now do most of the time anyway. Few MacBooks or Surface Books are not web-connected.

ChromeOS users mainly connect to free services. That's a problem because in the online world free can be a high price to pay.

Large companies don't give services away out of the goodness of their hearts. They want to advertise their client's products or manipulate you into voting a certain way. And we all know that works. It's an aspect of surveillance capitalism.

This gets worse.

ChromeOS uses Android apps to plug functionality or entertainment gaps. The experience is bad.

Android apps can be cheap and nasty at the best of times. They collect far too much user data. Many Android apps live at the seamy end of surveillance capitalism.

Ask yourself why you need to give someone your home address to write a document or your first pet's name1 in order to put an interesting filter on your uploaded pictures.

Dismal


If that wasn't bad enough, the Android app on ChromeOS experience is dismal. I can't bear to use it.

Many apps were clearly written for phones and make little or no allowance for larger screens and keyboards. They are buggy as anything and many are a security nightmare2.

There's something else bad about Chrome. We live in a world where technology iterates towards a kind of nirvana. Each successive line of Windows or MacOS computers is a step up on what went before. Each new generation of mobile phone has a better camera, faster processor, is packed with more oomph.

This applies even when there are two-steps forward, one step back messes like the butterfly keyboards in recent Apple laptops.

As Ruddock points out, the problem with Chrome, the OS and Chromebooks, the computers do not appear to be moving in any direction.

Going nowhere


Chromebooks are not as clunky as they were, some are nice to use. But it isn't going anywhere. The Chrome experience has barely changed over the years. There's little prospect of it changing in the near future.

It's stagnant.

Sure this might not matter to school students who need a fast, low-cost route to the web. It matters to almost everyone else.

Ruddock says there are aspects of Chrome life that amount to computing barbarism. He is being generous.

Sure, a MacBook or a Surface Book might cost getting on for ten times the price of a Chromebook. But the experience is on another plane. You can do so much more. It's a struggle doing everyday work on a Chromebook, it's a challenge being creative.



  1. Maybe not literally. But they often ask for information they have no right collecting

  2. Although I doubt the average Chromebook users cares much for security or privacy


ChromeOS: Google’s stumbling surveillance capitalism ecosystem was first posted at billbennett.co.nz.

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