Top Scoops

Book Reviews | Gordon Campbell | Scoop News | Wellington Scoop | Community Scoop | Search

 

Donations made to NZ First Foundation referred to police

(Headline abbreviated, original headlines: Donations made to NZ First Foundation referred to police for investigation)

Police have decided to refer inquiries into New Zealand First Foundation donations to the Serious Fraud Office.


Photo: RNZ / Claire Eastham-Farrelly

It follows a complaint to the Electoral Commission late last year about whether the party and the New Zealand First Foundation were complying with requirements for donations and loans.

Earlier this afternoon, the Electoral Commission said based on the information available, it had formed the view that the New Zealand First Foundation had received donations that should have been treated as party donations.

It said it had referred the matter to police.

"The Commission does not have the investigative powers to form a view about whether this failure to transmit and the non-disclosure means offences have been committed," the statement said.

"These matters have therefore been referred to the New Zealand Police, which have the necessary powers to investigate the knowledge and intent of those involved in fundraising, donating, and reporting donations."

A police spokesperson said the Electoral Commission had handed its file over this morning.

"We have assessed the file and will be referring the matter to the Serious Fraud Office," a statement said.

"As this matter is ongoing we are not in a position to comment further."

NZ First reacts

New Zealand First Leader Winston Peters said the party would review its arrangements for party donations in light of the Electoral Commission's decision.

Peters said that the party's model for collecting donations had been the same as other political parties.

However, he said the decision to refer the matter to the police, "underscores the importance of reviewing the donations regime".

"I had already advised the party last week to take this course of action and itself refer the matter to the police, which the party had agreed to do.

"This does not imply any impropriety but is intended to ensure the party, as with all parties, have robust arrangements.

"If the review deems it necessary for New Zealand First and all parties to develop new arrangements to receive donations the party will consult with the Electoral Commission", he said.

Peters said the party believed it had followed the law implicitly.

"I am advised that in all its dealings the Foundation sought outside legal advice and does not believe it has breached the Electoral Act.

"At this stage the SFO will consider if an offence has been committed, or otherwise, and it is not appropriate to make any comment on specific detail that prejudges their investigation", Peters said.

The background

RNZ revealed in November that New Zealand First had disclosed three loans from the mysterious foundation.

In 2017, it received $73,000. Then in 2018, it received a separate loan of $76,622, in what the Electoral Commission says was a loan executed to "replace the first loan". In 2019, it received another loan for $44,923.

Those giving money to the foundation are able to remain anonymous because under electoral law, loans are not subject to the same disclosure requirements as donations.

Last week, RNZ also reported on documents showing a series of donations to the New Zealand First Foundation from entities linked to some of the country's wealthiest people.

Many were a fraction below the threshold at which they would have to be publicly disclosed.

RNZ was not alleging that any of the donors broke any laws or were trying to keep their donations secret.

The Electoral Commission's decision came a day after New Zealand First leader Winston Peters said his party was lodging a police complaint over what he said was a "massive breach of the party's information".

"Ongoing media stories using as their source stolen information are designed to skew an even political playing field.

"New Zealand First has so far been sensitive to the circumstances surrounding the theft of party information but can no longer tolerate the mendacious attacks against the party and its supporters", he said yesterday.

Peters has repeatedly said that his party has done nothing wrong and has complied completely with electoral law.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Top Scoops Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On The Addiction To Chinese Student Fees

Last week, Australian PM Scott Morrison extended its ban on foreign visitors from or passing through from mainland China – including Chinese students - for a third week. New Zealand has dutifully followed suit, with our travel ban ... More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Coronavirus, And The Iowa Debacle

As Bloomberg says, the coronavirus shutdown is creating the world’s biggest work-from-home experiment. On the upside, the mortality rate with the current outbreak is lower than with SARS in 2003, but (for a number of reasons) the economic impact this time ... More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Dodging A Bullet Over The Transport Cost Over-Runs

As New Zealand gears up to begin its $6.8 billion programme of large scale roading projects all around the country, we should be aware of this morning’s sobering headlines from New South Wales, where the cost overruns on major transport projects ... More>>

Gordon Campbell:On Kobemania, Palestine And The Infrastructure Package

Quick quiz to end the week. What deserves the more attention – the death of a US basketball legend, or the end of Palestinian hopes for an independent state? Both died this week, but only one was met with almost total indifference by the global community. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On The Double Standard That’s Bound To Dominate The Election

Are National really better political managers than Labour, particularly when it comes to running the economy? For many voters – and the business community in particular - their belief in National’s inherent competence is a simple act of faith. More>>


Gordon Campbell : On Dealing With Impeccable, Impeachable Lies

By now, the end game the Republican Senate majority has in mind in their setting of the rules for the impeachment trial of Donald J. Trump is pretty clear to everyone: first deny the Democrats the ability to call witnesses and offer evidence, and then derisively dismiss the charges for lack of evidence. For his part, does former security adviser John Bolton really, really want to testify against his former boss? If there was any competing faction within the Republican Party, there might be some point for Bolton in doing so – but there isn’t. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Why The Dice Are Loaded Against Women..

If they enter public life, women can expect a type of intense (and contradictory) scrutiny that is rarely applied to their male counterparts... More>>