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The Dominion

Incis – World Cup Rugby – BIL Salaries – Stephen Anderson – Train Accidents – Moth Threat – Inside Headlines

INCIS: The Dominion leads this morning with a report that IBM and the police have signed a new contract to resume work on the Incis computer project sources say.

WORLD CUP RUGBY:The front page photo shows Tana Umaga enduring a Tongan high tackle an accompanying story says that the All Blacks are crying foul over the cheap shots.

Also on the front page:

- BIL SALARIES: a report that seven executives in the Brierley Investments empire each received payouts and salaries ranging from $1 million to $2.33 million in the past financial year;

- STEPHEN ANDERSON: a report that victim support was appalled it had not been given the opportunity to tell familes of Raurimu massacre victims that Stephen Anderson had been granted leave, chief executive Laureen Outtrim said yesterday;

- TRAIN ACCIDENTS: a report that the number of people killed or injured by trains in the past year is disturbing, says the Land Transport Safety Authority and Tranz Rail agrees.

- MOTH THREAT: A report that agriculture officials are calling for public help in containing the spread of a potentially serious threat to New Zealand’s billion dollar forestry industry. They want people to report sightings of hairy caterpillars with red legs.

Inside Headlines

- Funding gap ‘driving up’ health bill. Crime rate;
- Alliance offers more houses at lower rents;
- House to sit under urgency to clear up work;
- Party proposes marine reserves;
- Residency for bribes alleged;
- Creech backs proposal to cut number of MPs.


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