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Important Step for Disabled Workers


MEDIA RELEASE

21 March 2007

Important Step for Disabled Workers


Parliament passed the Disabled Persons Employment Promotion (Repeal and Related Matters) (DPEP Repel) Bill today. CCS advocated strongly for this Bill and believes it is an important step toward social inclusion for disabled people.

“This is a historic day for New Zealand. With the repeal many disabled workers have a better chance to have a job with a fair wage and paid holidays, in a safe work environment. This is also a much wider message of acceptance and inclusion of people with disabilities within our communities,” said Viv Maidaborn, CEO, CCS.

The disability and advocacy organisation says that when the DPEP Act was introduced in 1960 it may have been appropriate for that time, but it is now past its use by date. The disability sector has worked for many years and led the push for the repeal. Work with the Labour and Green Parties, and more recently the Maori, United Future, New Zealand First, and Progressive Parties has paid off with the votes today.

Disabled employee and Senior Advisor within a Crown Entity, Mike Gourley says the public sector can be a positive role model for employers.

“By taking a proactive approach to employing disabled people, the public sector can lead by example. The policies and programmes are already in place. The repeal of the DPEP Act will be an excellent motivator to putting them into practice,” he said.


“Our next goal is for more employers in the open market, including the public sector, to be looking towards disabled workers to fill vacancies. With formal and informal support, and the available subsidies, these positions have proven to be a great success for everyone,” said Viv Maidaborn.


ENDS

For further information: Viv Maidaborn - CEO, CCS – 027 280 6233
Mike Gourley – 021 547 636

CCS Background Information

CCS works in partnership with disabled people, their families and whanau to ensure equality of opportunity, quality of life and an environment that enhances full community integration and participation.

CCS exists to make a difference for disabled people, their families and whanau by removing barriers to inclusion and by offering support to disabled people to access all ordinary opportunities in their communities. Our community is made up of disabled people and their families and whanau, who live in Aotearoa New Zealand. We include all people who face barriers to inclusion on the basis of disability and who want to access the disability support services we provide.

Reflecting the commitment in the New Zealand Disability Strategy – Making A World of Difference Whakanui Oranga [Minister for Disability Issues April 2001], a key expectation of CCS work is that the New Zealand community grows its capacity to ensure that disabled people have the same rights, choices, opportunities and safeguards as other citizens.

CCS operates with a National Office and regional management structure, providing services nationally from 16 incorporated societies. We deliver regular services to over 6,000 people with disabilities making us one of the largest disability support service providers in New Zealand. CCS works closely with other disability agencies to ensure we make best use of shared knowledge and resources, helping us to adopt best practice across the sector.

Ends

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