Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Biodiversity HiveMind Report: Plenty Of Common Ground

What do people think about protecting and restoring New Zealand’s biodiversity? To find out, we invited New Zealanders to engage with each other on this topic as citizens using Scoop’s public engagement platform, HiveMind.

The HiveMind report Protecting and Restoring New Zealand’s Biodiversity, published today, analyses and summarises the findings of this engagement in which over 500 Kiwis took part.

Download The Full Report PDF Here

HiveMind is designed to enable citizens to safely exchange and consider ideas and proposals about a public issue with other citizens, with authorities, experts, organisations and with Scoop’s journalists and editors. It is designed to highlight both areas of difference and of common ground and allows participants to shape the discussion.

It appears from the findings that despite a diverse range of participants and perspectives, there are significant areas of common ground amongst participants on the future actions and elements that a National Biodiversity Strategy should include. This common ground is particularly encouraging at a time when politics in New Zealand and around the world is often so polarised that progress seems impossible.

The Biodiversity HiveMind ran over August and September 2019 on Scoop as one way for New Zealanders to take part in the DOC-led consultation on proposals for a new Biodiversity Strategy.

Two groups with some differing opinions

Two opinion groups emerged from consistent differences in voting patterns across multiple statements in the HiveMind.

While both groups included younger, middle-aged and older people from both urban and rural areas, the 72 people in Group A tended to be older and from rural areas whereas the 371 people in Group B tended to be more middle-aged and from the city.

Areas of Difference

Some of the main divisions between the two opinions groups were about:

Whether or not biodiversity is in crisis and whether more resources are needed to adequately manage it
The relationship between indigenous and non-indigenous biodiversity, and the desirability and feasibility of prioritising indigenous biodiversity
The management of browsing game animals such as deer that are valued for hunting and as a source of food.


Areas of Common Ground

Despite some fundamental differences of opinion about whether there even is a biodiversity crisis and about whether a biodiversity strategy should prioritise indigenous biodiversity, there were many areas of common ground on key issues. Below are some of the areas on which over 70% of respondents in both opinion groups were in agreement over statements:

Biodiversity is essential for our health and economy

“Our physical and mental health and prosperity depends on our natural environment” (85% agreed)

Protecting entire ecosystems

“Instead of focusing on protecting flagship species, we should focus on protecting entire ecosystems, which may include those species.” (75% agreed)

Biodiversity in urban areas is important too

“We should innovate to become more inclusive of nature and biodiversity in our city/town designs.” (90% agreed)

Better biodiversity education

“Education standards should require educational field trips to natural spaces for all school children.” (80% agreed)

More places where biodiversity can flourish

“There are large amounts of land are in public ownership in NZ that could be used to enhance biodiversity (e.g. roadside reserves, schools)” (85% agreed)
“More no-take marine reserves should be created, especially in the habitat of endangered animals, like Maui dolphins and endangered seabirds” (85% agreed)

We need to change to a more sustainable economic model

“Establish a partnership between the agriculture industry and government to develop and promote farming practices that protect and restore our biodiversity” (85% agreed)
“We need to move rapidly towards farming practices that promote sustainable food production e.g. the use of locally produced food, using techniques such as permaculture, biodynamics, urban agriculture” (75% agreed)
“To protect and restore biodiversity and ecosystem services we must move away from a fixation on economic growth and towards sustainable production and consumption” (70% agreed)

Environmental taxes and regulations

“Ownership of water rights should not allow degradation of the resource. Stronger management, quality and quantity standards are needed.” (75% agreed)

More Details About the Biodiversity Hivemind

HiveMind is a collaboration between Scoop and PEP launched in 2016.

The HiveMind participation page was at: Scoop Hivemind: Protecting and Restoring Biodiversity and includes links to information resources to support participation and instructions for taking part in the process.

This information-rich environment includes full coverage of biodiversity published on Scoop, the formal Biodiversity Strategy discussion document, and in-depth independent journalism by top environmental journalists on the new Scoop platform The Dig.

About Pol.is

HiveMind is powered by Pol.is, a new type of interactive survey technology that allows participants to consider statements about an issue, add their own statements for others to vote on, and to see how their opinions fit with other people’s views.

Pol.is a promising new digital platforms designed to enable mass public participation and has been used by a number of governments (e.g. Taiwan, Canada) and by major organisations (e.g. Columbia University). In Taiwan, Pol.is has been used as a major part of the policy development process for at least 6 laws.

We believe Scoop’s Pol.is-powered HiveMind process could usefully be used here in New Zealand to help authorities better understand issues and possible solutions from the perspective of citizens, particularly during the early stages of policy development.

Participation

The Biodiversity HiveMind closed on 22 September 2019. Participants were able to submit their own ideas and proposals for other participants to consider until 11 September.

Almost 100 people submitted around 250 statements and 536 people voted on at least one of the 154 statements that were moderated into the ‘discussion’. 443 people voted on enough statements for their voting patterns to be analysed.

Find Out More

For the full report with analysis and discussion please download the following PDF: http://img.scoop.co.nz/media/pdfs/1911/Biodiversity_HiveMind_Final_Report_Scoop.pdf

To access the raw datasets as anonymised open data files please contact Scoop Publishing on: hivemind@scoop.co.nz


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Overseas Investment Rules: New National Interest Test

Associate Finance Minister David Parker said under current Overseas Investment Act rules, assets such as ports and airports, telecommunications infrastructure, electricity and other critical infrastructure are not assessed through a national interest lens.

“We are introducing a number of new powers, consistent with global best practice, to protect New Zealanders’ best interests in such important – often monopoly – assets,” David Parker said.

Responding to concerns about overseas investment in water bottling, the Government will also require consideration of the impact on water quality and sustainability of a water bottling enterprise, when assessing an investment in sensitive land. More>>

 

Matter Of Trust: Peters Says NZ First Loans Legal

"Allegations raised this morning by Stuff Limited / Fairfax concern a party matter but I am confident that New Zealand First has operated within electoral laws, now and for the last 27 years." More>>

ALSO:

PGF CONFLICT OF INTEREST:

Gordon Campbell: On Labour’s Age Problem, And The Port Hills

Labour has been steadily improving its gender balance to the point where there are now 21 women in its caucus out of 46 MPs in all... Yet Labour has been just as steadily losing the generational battle to the Greens. More>>

ALSO:

Child Deaths Revealed: NZDF Deal To Clear Afghan Firing Ranges

The Defence Force has agreed a deal to clear unexploded ordnance in Afghanistan after revelations seven children were killed by unexploded devices left there. More>>

ALSO:

Charles & Camilla: Visit Takes Royals From Waitangi To Christchurch

Domestic violence services, conservation and education are all on the list for the royal tour. The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall will spend a week travelling the country from Waitangi to Christchurch. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Farming Sector’s Persecution Complex

The narrative that our farmers are ‘doing it tough’ plays into a number of wellworn stereotypes ... More>>

ALSO:

corrections, prisonCorrections: Independent Review Of Prisoner Mail Management

The independent review into the prisoner mail system has today been released, with Corrections accepting all 13 recommendations and making a number of changes to strengthen the management of prisoner mail. More>>

ALSO:

IPCA: Unlawful Detention Of Teenager; Influence Of Investigation

The Independent Police Conduct Authority has found that former Inspector Hurimoana Dennis unlawfully detained an Auckland teenager in 2015, and improperly influenced the outcome of a criminal investigation into his own son in 2014. More>>

ALSO:

SOP For Gun Bill: New Measures For Modified Pistols

The new controls will • Prohibit short-barrelled semi-automatic rifles which currently are defined as pistols because they are shorter than 762 millimetres. • Introduce tighter controls over pistol carbine conversion kits… • Prohibit firearms which contain a part known as a centrefire lower receiver… More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels