Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Major step towards accurate positioning promotes automation

Major step towards accurate positioning promotes automation across whole economy

The completion of the trial phase of the Satellite Based Augmented Positioning (SBAS) project is a breakthrough towards the use of highly accurate GPS data.

“In New Zealand, the NZSF trials focussed on the maritime sector, but the real winners will be aviation, land transport and agriculture,” says Annabel Young, Executive Director, NZ Shipping Federation (NZSF).

“New Zealand vessels carried the SBAS equipment into the Southern Ocean to identify the limits of the satellite reach, into Fiordland to test the effect of steep hills and around New Zealand to evaluate the resilience of the kit.”

There were 20 trials across Australasia, jointly funded by the Australian and New Zealand Governments. In New Zealand, Land Information NZ (LINZ) has been the lead agency, reflecting the importance of highly accurate positioning information, especially after land deformations, for example, after earthquakes.

“Aviation will be a major beneficiary of SBAS. For example, with SBAS, aircraft will be able to land at regional airports more often in adverse weather, reducing the number of diversions and cancellations.”

In the 2018 Australian Federal Budget, funding for the roll-out of an operational SBAS over Australia was announced. The New Zealand Government is developing a business case for a service here.

“The biggest cost of a SBAS is the need for two satellites to ensure service reliability. From the user perspective, the service is expected to be able to be received on existing GPS equipment.”

“This really is a game changer,” says Ms Young.

An industry briefing on the results of the SBAS trails is being held in Wellington on Wednesday 13 2018. There will also be a function to celebrate the results of the tests after this briefing.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 


R&NTU: KiwiRail strike notices withdrawn following new offer

Strike notices on KiwiRail have been withdrawn. Rail and Maritime Transport Union General Secretary Wayne Butson says following negotiations between the RMTU and KiwiRail, a new offer from KiwiRail will be taken back to union members for ratification... More>>



Banking: Stress Tests Show Strengthening Bank Resilience

The latest stress tests carried out by the Reserve Bank of New Zealand – Te Pūtea Matua show strengthening resilience in the banking sector and the benefits of continuing to build capital buffers... More>>


Statistics: Building Activity Down In September Quarter
The volume of building activity in New Zealand fell 8.6 percent in the September 2021 quarter, compared with the June 2021 quarter, Stats NZ said today. Residential building activity fell by 6.4 percent in the September 2021 quarter, while non-residential building activity fell 12 percent... More>>



Reserve Bank: Deputy Governor Reflects On Time At RBNZ
Central bankers must continue to look forward to guard against the unpredictable, Deputy Governor Geoff Bascand says in a speech published today. Mr Bascand joined the Reserve Bank of New Zealand – Te Pūtea Matua in 2013 during the aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis... More>>


Xero: Data Reveals ICT Expenditure Key To Small Business Sales Growth
Xero, the global small business platform, today released a new report which shows New Zealand small business ICT expenditure has increased 25 percent compared to pre-pandemic levels - more than the UK (20%) and Australia... More>>


Fonterra: Lifts Forecast Farmgate Milk Price Range And Revises Earnings Guidance At First Quarter Update

Fonterra Co-operative Group today lifted its 2021/22 forecast Farmgate Milk Price range, reported a solid start to the 2022 financial year and revised its earnings guidance... More>>


Canterbury Museum: New Research - Bald Haast's Eagle Feasted On Moa Guts

New Zealand’s extinct Haast’s Eagle (Hieraaetus moorei), the largest known eagle, gulped down viscera like a vulture and may even have been bald, new research suggests... More>>