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New release highlights effectiveness of Māori Television

Media Release

10 Haratua-May 2017

New research shows that Māori Television is playing a vital role in the revitalisation of te reo Māori

Research on the impact of Māori Television on te reo Māori, shows that it plays a vital role in the normalisation and revitalisation of the Māori language.

The 2016 project Māori Broadcasting Language Impact Evaluation, conducted by Kantar TNS and Colmar Brunton, was a joint venture between Māori Television and Te Māngai Pāho. Māori Television CEO Pāora Maxwell says that the research also indicates that Māori Television has a positive impact on the intergenerational transmission of te reo in the home.

“The intergenerational transmission of language in the home and the community is at the heart of the revitalisation of any language – which is why our linear and digital offerings, which bring the language into the heart of the home, are crucial for the survival of indigenous languages and culture,” says Mr Maxwell.

“Māori Television unlocks the challenges and removes the barriers to participate in language learning – it provides an accessible, safe environment to hear, see and immerse in the language and culture - for both Māori and non-Māori.”

“We are also heartened to learn from the research that Māori Television is playing a key role in growing positive attitudes towards the language and culture. Thirty percent of the increase in understanding Māori culture and receptivity towards te reo among non-Māori can be attributed to Māori Television and 11% of the increase in language ability among all Māori 15+ can be attributed to Māori Television.”

“The research is an important part of our work in assessing our effectiveness in achieving our role of contributing to the revitalisation of te reo Māori me ngā tikanga. We will continue to work collaboratively with Te Māngai Pāho and other language revitalisation organisations to better understand how to overcome the barriers that prevent the uptake of the language,” says Mr Maxwell.

Key Findings

• 11% of the increase in language ability among all Māori 15+ can be attributed to Māori Television (NB. the figure for iwi radio is 5%);

• 30% of the increase in understanding Māori culture and receptivity towards te reo among non-Māori can be attributed to Māori Television;

• Māori Television provides a sense of connection with and importance placed on Māori culture and language;

• Māori Television provides encouragement and a desire to engage;

• Māori Television brings Māori language and culture into the home, supporting inter-generational transmission of te reo in the home;

• Māori Television provides a sense of connection with and importance placed on Māori culture and language;

• Māori Television unlocks the challenges and removes the barriers to participate in language learning – it provides an accessible, safe environment to hear, see and immerse in the language and culture for Māori and non-Māori;

• Māori Television acts as a beacon and is seen to be the trusted source to go to for anything and everything to do with the Māori world;

• Māori Television provides a positive and contemporary portrayal of Maori culture, providing indirect support / motivation to connect with and to be exposed to Maori culture;

• Education, and participation in cultural activities, are each unique drivers of language acquisition, and a lack of confidence, relevance and time is a unique inhibitor.

Methodology

• The research engaged experts with experience in language revitalisation, policy implementation, broadcasting, iwi revitalisation and teaching in schools.

• 1060 Māori 15yrs+ and 454 non-Māori regular viewers of MTS 18yrs+ were interviewed.

• The research included a literature review.

• Over 70 indicators, drivers and barriers of language revitalisation were measured.


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