Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 

Opening night with New Zealand star Amalia Hall

Orchestra Wellington celebrates its opening night with New Zealand
star Amalia Hall

Orchestra Wellington’s season opener features a thrilling concerto
performance by Amalia Hall.

The orchestra brightens your midwinter night on June 9th, with two of
the warmest pieces of music written – book-casing one of the great
violin concertos of the 20th century.

In between symphonies by Mozart and Dvorak, the orchestra’s very own
Amalia Hall, performs Bartok’s second Violin Concerto, a piece which
combines dazzling virtuosity with heartbreaking lyricism.

Born and bred in New Zealand, Hall’s numerous competition successes
include laureate prizes at the Joseph Joachim International Violin
Competition in Hannover, the International Violin Competition 'Premio
R. Lipizer', the International Tchaikovsky Competition for Young
Musicians, Premio Citta di Padova International Competition for
Soloists and Orchestra, and the Kloster Schöntal International Violin
Competition.

Orchestra Wellington music director Marc Taddei promised big things
when Hall was appointed concertmaster in 2016 – two years on, she’s
playing two concertos in the orchestra’s Great and Noble Season ’18.

The upcoming performance on June 9th will be Hall’s first solo
performance with the orchestra since she took over the reins as it’s
leader last year, following her show stopping world premiere of Claire
Cowen’s “Stark” concerto, which saw her changing costume between
movements.

The Hungarian, Bartok wrote his Violin Concerto No.2 in 1938 as the
shadows of fascism loomed large over Europe. That tension finds plenty
of expression on the music’s rapid twists and turns.

But Bartok’s love of his own country’s folk melodies is never far
away, expressed in romantic melodies, modernistic rhythms and sizzling
virtuosity. The challenge for orchestra and soloist is tying
everything together.

Also on the playlist is a magnificent work by Mozart, his Prague
Symphony. Mozart counted the day he presented this symphony to the
public in 1787 as one of the happiest of his life.

Orchestra Wellington is performing a cycle of Dvorak’s symphonies
during its six concert season starting with Dvorak’s Fifth Symphony.
The work opens with a fanfare scored for clarinets. The finale takes a
dramatic theme reminiscent of Tchaikovsky.

For interviews please contact Penny Miles, publicist, 021 644 800.

ORCHESTRA WELLINGTON presents Golden City

Saturday 9th June, 7.30pm
Michael Fowler Centre

Marc Taddei, music director
Amalia Hall, violin

Mozart Symphony No. 38 ‘Prague’
Bartok Violin Concerto No. 2
Dvorak Symphony No. 5

OrchestraWellington.co.nz


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

40 Years On: Prime Minister Delivers Erebus Apology

"That loss, in and of itself, was huge. It sent ripples across the country, and trauma that those who weren’t directly affected would probably struggle to fathom. But that loss and grief was compounded. It was undeniably worsened by the events that followed." More>>

ALSO:

The Testaments: Margaret Atwood Announces Three NZ Events

The evening will also feature Atwood’s remarkable career, her diverse range of works and why she has returned to the fictional world of Gilead 34 years later. More>>

ALSO:

Transit Of Mercury: Historic Viewing Recreated

Keen stargazers gathered at Te Whanganui o Hei, or Mercury Bay, on the Coromandel Peninsula to watch a rare astronomic event this morning. More>>

ALSO:

Forest And Bird: Hoiho Crowned Bird Of The Year For 2019

Widely considered an underdog, the valiant hoiho (yellow-eyed penguin) has smashed the feathered ceiling to win Bird of the Year, a first for seabirds in the competition's 14 year history. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis: Very Silly Stormtroopers - Jojo Rabbit

Described as “an anti-hate satire,” Taiki Waititi's latest movie depicts the growth of a young boy in Nazi Germany who seeks advice on how to become a tough man from his 'imaginary friend' - a highly eccentric version of Adolf Hitler.
More>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • CULTURE
  • HEALTH
  • EDUCATION
 


 
  • Wellington
  • Christchurch
  • Auckland