Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

College of GPs does not endorse euthanasia

6 March 2018

For immediate release

College of GPs does not endorse euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide: response to call for submissions on End of Life Choice Bill

The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners has submitted its response to the Justice Committee of Parliament today (6 March 2018). The submission is clear that the College does not endorse euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide, which it considers a matter for individual members’ consciences, within the law.

The submission makes 17 recommendations to the Justice Committee, in light of the state of palliative care in New Zealand, the effect legislation may have on vulnerable people, and the effect euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide has on the doctor-patient relationship. The submission also goes into detail to recommend changes to specific challenges the Bill, as drafted, poses. That includes criteria for assisted dying, conscientious objection, and the role of the medical practitioner.

Dr Tim Malloy, President of the Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners, said:

“Whether for or against euthanasia, the College’s members are motivated by compassion – this is a key tenet of the profession. We believe that each general practitioner in New Zealand will have their own ethical view on whether euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide is right.

“However, whether or not this Bill goes ahead, there are significant challenges that must be addressed. Fundamentally, New Zealanders need accessible, good quality palliative care. The Government should strengthen these services, so we can all experience a dignified, comfortable death.

“The College has made several recommendations to the Justice Committee for its consideration on the Bill itself. The Bill, currently, has poorly defined criteria for assisted dying. Diagnosis is difficult, we sometimes get a diagnosis wrong. And knowing if a patient is able to make a rational decision, during their end of life care, can be incredibly difficult.

“Parliament should consider our 17 recommendations carefully, given the strong apprehension from general practitioners about legalising euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.”

Ends

Background

General practice is a medical speciality, and general practitioners (GPs) treat patients of all ages, from neonates to elderly, across the course of their lives. GPs make up 40 percent of the medical workforce.

The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners is the professional body for GPs, and is the largest medical college in the country. The College’s mission is improving the health of all New Zealanders.

The College’s submission to the Justice Committee can be read on its website. The College has also submitted a compilation of members’ submissions.

The recommendations are:

1. The Government improves and strengthens palliative care services for all New Zealanders.

2. The Government provides more financial support for families caring for a family member at the end of their life.

3. The Government invests in ensuring Māori have access to culturally appropriate palliative care.

4. The Government implements a public information campaign to ensure New Zealanders understand what euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are, who would be eligible for it, and the wider implications of any legalisation before the Bill progresses further through Parliament. This would be of particular importance if the Government holds a referendum on this issue.

5. The Government invests more money in mental health services.

The following recommendations apply if the law is changed:

6. The Bill specifically prevents people with mental health conditions from qualifying for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide.

7. The Select Committee carefully considers the scope of medical practitioners and minimum practice experience of the practitioners who would offer euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide services.

8. The Bill requires that medical practitioners receive appropriate training and support to enable them to provide quality advice and care to patients and their families.

9. The minimum age of eligibility for euthanasia be set at 25 years.

10. The Bill’s eligibility criteria are reconsidered to tighten the definition of who is eligible for euthanasia and for physician-assisted suicide.

11. The Bill’s introduction be amended to remove the requirement for medical practitioners who do not wish to participate in euthanasia to refer patients to the SCENZ Group.

12. Patients seeking euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide be obliged to self-refer to the SCENZ register in the first instance to consult with a registered medical professional who is trained and willing to provide physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia services.

13. Clause 8 be amended to recognise the difficulties of making accurate prognoses and to clarify whether medical practitioners’ advice to patients is limited to medical impacts.

14. The Select Committee considers how to deal with situations where a patient with reduced decision-making capacity wishes to forgo the Advanced Care Plan made when they were mentally competent.

15. Clause 15 be amended to make it explicitly clear if the Bill refers to euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide, and if both, when the legislation applies to either option.

16. The Select Committee considers the complexities of euthanasia and/or physician-assisted suicide if something goes wrong.

17. Clause 19 be amended to ensure the privacy and confidentiality of the medical professionals who elect to perform euthanasia or provide physician-assisted suicide.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines


Gordon Campbell: On Who Decides On The Priority List For Vaccines

During the past week, the nation has gone through a range of mixed feelings about south Auckland. Understandably, there’s been a hankering in some quarters to punish a few of the rule breakers who plunged all of Auckland back into lockdown…Yet alongside that impulse there also been compassion for the way that poverty and overcrowding make south Aucklanders extremely vulnerable to the spread of the virus... More>>


 




Government: PHARMAC Review Announced

The Government is following through on an election promise to conduct an independent review into PHARMAC, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Health Minister Andrew Little announced today... More>>

ALSO:


Government: Main Benefits To Increase In Line With Wages

All measures of child poverty were trending downwards, prior to the COVID-19 lockdown, across the two years since year ended June 2018, Stats NZ said today. The COVID-19 lockdown in late March 2020 affected Stats NZ’s ability to collect data from households ... More>>

Government: Reserve Bank To Take Account Of Housing In Decision Making

The Reserve Bank is now required to consider the impact on housing when making monetary and financial policy decisions, Grant Robertson announced today. Changes have been made to the Bank’s Monetary Policy Committee’s remit requiring it to take into ... More>>

ALSO:


Covid-19: Auckland Back To Alert Level Three After One New Community Case Revealed

Auckland will move to alert level three for a week at 6am tomorrow morning after two new Covid-19 community cases announced this evening could not be directly linked to earlier cases, the Prime Minister has confirmed.
The rest of the country will move to level two.... More>>

NZ Initiative: New Report Highlights How Our Housing Crisis Could Worsen If We Don’t Act Now

If New Zealand politicians thought the housing crisis in 2020 was bad, the worst is yet to come, warns a new report by The New Zealand Initiative. In The Need to Build: The demographic drivers of housing demand , Research Assistant Leonard Hong ... More>>

Parliament: Kiwi MPs Among The “Most Educated In The World”

New analysis of MP qualifications reveals New Zealand’s Parliament is one of the most educated and highest qualified in the world, and significantly more educated than Australia’s. The research, by Mark Blackham of BlacklandPR and Geoffrey Miller ... More>>

The Dig: An Illogical Ideological Struggle

Dig beneath all the trade wars and the arguments to the effect that the USA should not permit China to achieve economic and technological superiority, or even parity, and you find the real reason behind the conflict... More>>

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels