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North Korea Demands US BAck Off Military Pressure

KCNA Blames U.S. for "Crisis"

Pyongyang - Commander of the U.S. 7th Fleet Walter Doran reportedly said on October 1 that the U.S. navy was examining the deployment of a carrier in the waters of Hawaii or Guam. The U.S.

scheme to send an additional carrier to the Asia-Pacific region while having one constantly stationed in Japan is said to be intended to cope with "the crisis on the Korean peninsula."


The U.S. is sticking to its demand that the DPRK scrap its nuclear program first to disarm it while waxing eloquent that it would peacefully settle the nuclear standoff with the DPRK.


Under this situation, it is discussing a very dangerous military option such as additional carrier dispatch. It clearly shows that it has no intention at all to abandon its hostile policy towards the DPRK but is persisting in its attempts to bring the DPRK to its knees by force.


The U.S. aggressive intention was clearly evidenced by the fact that U.S.-made military hardware was massively displayed in the large-scale "military parade" of the south Korean army staged on the same day in Seoul and the U.S. directly participated in it, flying its attack helicopters for the first time after the signing of the "mutual defense pact."


History and realities show that the crisis on the Korean peninsula finds its origin in the U.S. policy of military occupation of south Korea and it is getting worse today owing to the bellicose and unilateral hard-line policy of the Bush administration. The U.S. should act with reason, pondering over the consequences to be involved by its military pressure upon the DPRK.

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