Scoop has an Ethical Paywall
Work smarter with a Pro licence Learn More

World Video | Defence | Foreign Affairs | Natural Events | Trade | NZ in World News | NZ National News Video | NZ Regional News | Search

 

Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C., Faces Another Terrorist Attack

Cuba’s embassy in the U.S. capital of Washington D.C. was the target of a violent attack late on September 24. In a statement shared on X, the platform formerly known as Twitter, Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodríguez Parrilla said that an individual had thrown two Molotov cocktails at the embassy building.

He added that no personnel had been injured in the attack and the details of the incident were being looked into. He also noted that this was the second such attack against the headquarters of Cuba’s diplomatic mission in the U.S. An individual had fired multiple rounds of bullets from an AK-47 assault rifle at the building in April 2020.

Cuba’s embassy in France was also attacked with Molotov cocktails in July 2021.

“Anti-Cuban groups resort to terrorism because they feel impunity, something Cuba has warned U.S. authorities about,” Rodríguez said.

In a report released in 2020, Cuba’s Center for Historical Investigations of State Security (CIHSE) documented 581 attacks against the country’s diplomatic representations abroad since the Cuban Revolution in 1959. These attacks have led to the deaths of approximately 365 people and injured 721, including foreign nationals.

The September 24 attack took place just hours after President Miguel Díaz-Canel arrived back in Havana after attending the 78th Session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York. Cuba is currently serving as the chairman of the G77+China bloc of countries.

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading

Are you getting our free newsletter?

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.

© Scoop Media

Advertisement - scroll to continue reading
 
 
 
World Headlines

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Join Our Free Newsletter

Subscribe to Scoop’s 'The Catch Up' our free weekly newsletter sent to your inbox every Monday with stories from across our network.