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Electricity prices should come down

December 16, 2013

Electricity prices should come down

With power supply clearly outstripping demand, electricity prices are now too high and should come down, the Employers and Manufacturers Association says.

"New Zealand clearly now has an excess of installed electricity capacity," said Kim Campbell, EMA's chief executive.

"Demand for power is well below the country's generation capacity and its price should reduce to help stimulate New Zealand's economic recovery and offset inflationary pressures forecast in other parts of the economy.

"At present projections the savings available to business and residential consumers would be at least $67 million a year, but we suspect it could be much more.

"Stating as Mighty River Power has, that they will not increase the electricity price for three years is simply not enough.

"The Major Electricity Users Group notes the futures price for wholesale power for the year from 1st April 2014 is 7.14 c/kWh, down 0.17 c/kWh for the year. In a competitive market this reduction would be reflected in wholesale costs which would be passed through to retail customers.

"MEUG calculates that an average household using 8,000 kWh per year would save at least $13.80 per year or $23 million for all households.

"For all businesses and residences the potential cost reductions amount to $67 million in 2014/15.

"To maximise competitiveness our electricity market structures need to ensure the lowest possible power price while signalling the right time to invest in future generation and transmission.

"The Labour/Greens electricity proposal to underprice our existing power assets is no answer.

"To spur on market competition businesses should seek out the best power deals at www.whatsmynumber.org.nz/mybusiness

ENDS

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