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Cablegate: Ankara Media Reaction Report

This record is a partial extract of the original cable. The full text of the original cable is not available.

UNCLAS SECTION 01 OF 03 ANKARA 006313

SIPDIS

DEPARTMENT FOR INR/R/MR, EUR/SE, EUR/PD, NEA/PD, DRL
JCS PASS J-5/CDR S. WRIGHT

E.O. 12958: N/A
TAGS: OPRC KMDR TU
SUBJECT: ANKARA MEDIA REACTION REPORT
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2005

THIS REPORT PRESENTS THE TURKISH PRESS SUMMARY UNDER THREE
THEMES:

HEADLINES
BRIEFING
EDITORIAL OPINION
--------------------------------------------- --

HEADLINES


MASS APPEAL
Gul: UN Aid to Pakistan to be Transferred Via Incirlik -
Turkiye
Talat to Ask for Direct US Flights to northern Cyprus -
Sabah
Greek Cypriots Angered at US Invitation to Talat - Milliyet
Shiites to Settle Accounts With Saddam - Aksam
Saddam to Use Milosevic Tactics in Court - Sabah
Iran Accuses Britain in Ahvaz Bombings - Vatan
Baku Tense over Guliev's Return - Milliyet
Rice Denies She Will Run for US Presidency - Star
US Prepares for Hurricane Vilma - Star

OPINION MAKERS
Rice Invites Talat to Washington - Yeni Safak
Papoulias: Turkey's Occupation of Cyprus a Disgrace -
Radikal
Nicosia to Hold Nikiforos Exercise - Zaman
Earthquake Unite Hindus, Muslims in Kashmir - Zaman
Iraq Constitution May be Rejected - Yeni Safak
Sunnis Unhappy with Iraq Constitution - Zaman
70 Killed in Ramadi, Mostly Civilians - Yeni Safak
Regime Opponents Unite in Syria - Yeni Safak
Israel Suspends Security Ties with Palestine - Zaman
Basayev Claims Nalchik Attacks - Cumhuriyet
Rove, Libby May Soon be Sacked - Radikal

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BRIEFING

Gul on Iraq Constitution Vote: Foreign Minister Abdullah
Gul has described the referendum on the new constitution in
Iraq as `a success.' Gul told the Turkish press while en
route to Finland yesterday that although the constitution
created many concerns for Turkey, the political process in
Iraq will continue. `A new government will be formed in
Iraq following the elections to be held in December. The
new parliament may exacerbate our concerns or eliminate
them. Everything will become clear during the political
process,' Gul said. FM Gul also stressed that unity is
necessary in Iraq in order to preserve stability.

Earthquake Aid to Pakistan through Incirlik Airbase: On
Monday, Foreign Minister Gul said at a press briefing prior
to his official travel to Finland that UN High Commissioner
for Refugees Antonio Guterres had called him on Sunday to
ask for Turkey's help in the transfer of 700 tons of UN aid,
now waiting in Turkey's southern province of Mersin, to
Pakistan. Gul said the aid will be flown to Pakistan
through Incirlik Airbase using NATO assets and Turkish
aircraft.

Erdogan to Visit Quake-Hit Pakistan: Prime Minister Tayyip
Erdogan will visit quake-stricken Pakistan later this week,
a Turkish Foreign Ministry (MFA) official said on Tuesday.
Erdogan is expected to arrive in Islamabad on Thursday, and
will hold talks with President Musharraf and PM Aziz on
Friday. He will also visit some of the areas affected by
the quake, according to MFA sources.

US Invites Talat to Washington: Turkish Cypriot leader
Mehmet Ali Talat has been invited to Washington on October
28 to meet with Secretary Rice, his office said on Monday.
Douglas Silliman, Assistant Director for Southeast European
Affairs at the State Department, conveyed the invitation
during a meeting with Talat yesterday in Cyprus. Silliman
said after the meeting that the invitation was part of US
efforts to seek a lasting settlement on the divided island.
Talat welcomed the invitation, calling for an end to the
decades-old economic isolation of northern Cyprus. Turkish
papers report that the invitation has caused great
consternation among Greek Cypriot leaders.

Yakis Hints at Possible Opening on Ports Issue: AKP Deputy
and former foreign minister Yasar Yakis said yesterday that
`it wouldn't be the end of the world' if Turkey were to open
its ports and airports to the Greek Cypriots. Yakis'
comments appeared on the front page of the leftist-
nationalist "Cumhuriyet" and were also carried this morning
on NTV. In discussing the issue, Yakis mentioned the
example of Taiwan, `which is not recognized but which has
trade relations with the whole world.' Yakis implied that
the Government is working on a possible solution to the
problem.

Turkey Interested in Chinese Missiles: Visiting General Xu
Caihou, vice-chairman of China's Central Military
Commission, met with Turkish General Staff (TGS) Chief
General Hilmi Ozkok on Monday to discuss military
cooperation between the two countries, "Aksam" reports.
Turkey wants to make use of China's space technology and
produce short-range missiles with the Chinese.

AKP Lawmaker Joins ANAP: Hasan Ozyer, an AKP lawmaker from
Mugla province, joined the Motherland Party (ANAP) on
Tuesday after resigning from the AKP yesterday. The
following is the new distribution of seats in the
parliament: AKP 355, CHP 155, ANAP 22, SHP 4, DYP 4, HYP 1,
Independent 5, and Vacant 4.

Kurdistan Freedom Hawks Claim Istanbul Bombing: The
Kurdistan Freedom Hawks, described by the Turkish media as a
PKK splinter group, has claimed responsibility for last
Saturday's bombing of a gas station in the Istanbul
neighborhood of Maslak. Police say they are looking for `a
team of 5 PKK militants' in connection with the bombing.

Three Terrorists Killed in East Turkey: Security forces
killed three terrorists in the eastern province of Tunceli
on Monday, papers report. The Tunceli Governor's Office
said the three Maoist Communist Party-People's Liberation
Army (MKP-HKO) militants were killed in a clash in a rural
area of Tunceli during operations targeting PKK fighters.

Motorola Close to Deal on Telsim Sale: "Milliyet" reports
that US telecom giant Motorola is nearing an agreement with
the Turkish Savings Insurance Fund regarding proceeds from
the sale of Telsim, the cellular network confiscated from
the Uzan family. Motorola has accused the Uzans of
defrauding the company of several billion dollars in the
late 1990s. Under the proposed deal, Motorola would receive
20 percent of the revenue raised in the sale of Telsim. The
report claims that a final agreement is being held up due to
Motorola's reluctance to agree to pay back the money in the
event that the telsim sale is rejected by the Turkish
courts.


EDITORIAL OPINION: Iraq

"The `Yes' Vote Will Not Settle Everything"
Sami Kohen observed in the mainstream "Milliyet" (10/18):
"Even though the official figures have not yet been
announced, we can conclude that the majority of Iraqi people
have accepted the constitution. The Sunnis, who boycotted
the elections in January, largely participated in the
referendum, which helped it to gain greater legitimacy. The
tendency in the voting was toward `no' votes from the Sunnis
and mostly `yes' votes from the Kurds and Shiites. This is
a clear indication that Iraq remains divided on regional,
ethnic, and religious grounds. . The Bush administration
views the referendum results as a triumph for the
establishment of democracy in Iraq. The referendum was
indeed a good test by Middle East standards, but we really
have to wait to see whether this `democracy' will actually
bring peace, security, and national unity in Iraq. The
people of Iraq, as expressed during interviews about the
referendum process, want to see an end to the problems they
face in their daily lives -- water shortages, power
failures, and a lack of security. Whether the new political
process in Iraq will be able to address those problems
remains to be seen."

"Iraq"
Cengiz Candar commented in the tabloid "Bugun" (10/18): "It
looks like the Iraq constitution will be approved by a
narrow margin, thus paving the way for parliamentary
elections on December 15. This process will be an important
indicator of whether the Sunni-led armed resistance in Iraq
will start to weaken. This is especially important, as we
still cannot talk about a consensus constitution -- a
majority of Sunnis, who make up 20 percent of Iraq, did not
approve it. Iraq and the entire Middle East will continue
to be problematic. . Iraq is an issue for the entire Middle
East. In the event that Iraq is divided, other countries --
Jordan, Syria, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait -- cannot remain
within their current borders, as of these borders were drawn
at the same time as Iraq's. The Middle East will be chaotic
in the short and medium terms. We need to be prepared for
this."

"The Iraq Referendum -- Putting Water in a Basket"
Mustafa Balbay argued in the leftist-nationalist
"Cumhuriyet" (10/18): "We have learned from President Bush
that a majority of Iraqi people have accepted the
constitution. The American administration decided on the
Iraqis choice first, and then put the ballot boxes in front
of them. . The US was planning to establish stability and to
reconstruct Iraq. According to the plans shaped prior to
the occupation, these results should have been successfully
achieved by now. But the reality is different. There are
even reports about insurgents gaining control near the
`green zone.' In other words, the US is not comfortable
even in the most secure areas of Iraq. . It looks like the
US will have a much harder time leaving Iraq than it did
entering. US efforts to establish order in Iraq are
starting to look like trying to fill a basket with water."

MCELDOWNEY

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