Local Govt | National News Video | Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Search

 


Parking changes follow Council workshop

19 November 2012

Parking changes follow Council workshop

The Palmerston North City Council acknowledges public angst over the city’s innovative parking technology and is announcing some immediate changes to make the system more flexible.

This evening, Councillors and staff held a workshop to discuss parking issues. Council chief executive Paddy Clifford says both Councillors and staff are aware of the issues faced by members of the public and retailers.

“Many issues were aired and a number of options debated. It was decided a more flexible system was required in the short-term in order to resolve the issues in the long-term.”

As of today Council will:

• Extend the tolerance period from 5 minutes to 10 minutes before and after meter time to allow people time to get change and reduce stress on the way back to their vehicle.

• Use of ‘Parking Pixies’ for two week period on peak days prior to Christmas specifically targeting visitors to the city.

• Review charges and consider whether these should alter

• Following a retailer survey, carried out at the weekend, Council will review parking periods in different areas of the CBD

In the longer term Council will:

• Establish a Working Group made up of Councillor and management representatives.

• Develop longer term solutions through a Comprehensive Parking Management Plan, to be completed in 2013.

• Investigate the viability of changes asked for by the public:

8 Reduced charges in low use areas

8 Automatic receipting

8 Continuous bay numbering that are easier to read

8 Screens that are easier to read

8 Limit loss of service of credit card and text transactions

8 Pay and display

The workshop acknowledged that not everything is in Council’s control. The $40 fine for failing to activate the metre is set by central government.

Council acknowledges that visitors from areas without parking meters may continue to run into issues.

Paddy Clifford says Council is in a partnership with Frogparking and is committed to working with Frogparking. “Sensor technology is becoming common place elsewhere. We acknowledge Council’s aims and objectives are different to that of Frogparking and that causes tension from time to time however I’m certain we can create a work together to improve the situation.”

The Workshop began with a reminder of why Frogparking was adopted. Council wanted to increase compliance rates, which were then sitting at around 60%, in the belief that more people paying for parking was better than more people being fined for infringements. At the time, Council was made aware the change would lead to an increase in infringements in the short term.

Previously, on average 2-3% of infringements were ticketed. Now, almost two years in to the Frogparking pilot, on average 6-9% of infringements are ticketed and the level of compliance has increased to 90%.

Today, on average around 5,300 meter transactions per day are made, all of which are monitored in real time by Council staff.

Council parking wardens issue on average 180 tickets for meter offences every day, accounting for 3.5% of all parking transactions.

This indicates that by and large the vast majority of people operate meters without any issue what-so-ever.

Breaking down the figures further, on average between 6% to 9% of all potential offences result in tickets being issued. The reason only some infringements are ticketed is because many vehicles are moved before a parking warden arrives.

The agreement with Frogparking was signed in 2010. Then parking occupancy levels were on average at 60%, today that has fallen to around 40%. There are a variety of reasons including:

8 a significant increase in the number of over 700 car parks in the central city (the Plaza’s staged introduction) thereby providing motorists with more options.

8 The continuation of the Global Financial Crisis which has affected car parking occupancy rates around the country.

The issue and the reduction in occupancy is concerning to retailers. On Friday and Saturday a survey of 150 retailers in the central business district was carried out and three main areas of concern were identified:

· The system is too complicated

· There is not enough grace period

· People cannot top-up time

Retailers were also asked what they thought was an appropriate length of time motorists should be allowed to park however an inconsistent message was received as some preferred the status quo, others such as hairdressers, more and some, such as cafés , less.
ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Open Source // Open Society - Full Coverage

Gordon Campbell:
On The Reserve Bank And Auckland Housing

The ‘crisis – what crisis?’ response by the government to the Auckland housing price bubble is no longer acceptable.

So says Reserve Bank governor Grant Spencer – who used unusually frank language in his speech and subsequent interviews yesterday to call for a capital gains tax, and to generally chastise central and local government for their inaction on a threat to the country’s economic health and financial stability.

That threat has been real for some time. The housing price bubble has already created a currency bubble... Undaunted, the government keeps calling this situation a success story. More>>

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Bangladesh: GCSB Dragging NZ Into Human Rights Abuses

The New Zealand government should stop providing intelligence assistance to Bangladeshi security agencies that are known to systematically engage in human rights abuses, said the Green Party today. More>>

ALSO:

Troops Heading To Iraq: Government Must Come Clean On Deployment

New Zealanders deserve more than to hear about their troops’ deployment overseas from Australian media, Opposition Leader Andrew Little says. “News from Australia that Kiwi troops are on their way to Iraq this week is another example of the culture of secrecy and unknown protections around the deployment.” More>>

ALSO:

Image: Strikers And Protestors Join Outside McDonald's

A group of protestors took to McDonald’s Manners St today as a part of the international fast food workers day of action to end zero hour contracts. More>>

ALSO:

Greens: Special Education Funds Not Spent

More than $32 million of funding for children with special needs has not been spent by the Government, despite families of children with special needs complaining for years that they’ve been denied the support they deserve. More>>

ALSO:

John Key: Pre-Budget Speech To Business NZ

So this Government will remain relentlessly focused on improving the competitiveness of our economy... We will continue to give businesses a platform to invest, grow and create jobs in the knowledge they will be backed by a clear and consistent government policy programme. More>>

ALSO:

Multimedia: Andrew Little’s Response To John Key’s Pre-Budget Address

Labour Party leader Andrew Little spoke today on John Key’s pre-budget address this afternoon in Wellington. Little said National has had seven years to achieve a surplus and Kiwis have “fufilled their end of the bargain.” More>>

Surplus Baggage: Key Backs Off ‘Artificial Target’

John Key’s attempt to redefine his cornerstone promise of two election campaigns as an artificial target suggests his other promises are works of fiction, says Labour’s Finance spokesperson Grant Robertson. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On UE Pass Rates And University Dropout Rates

Houston, there is clearly a problem with (a) the plunge in pass rates for University Entrance qualifications, which has been especially steep among Maori students and also a problem with (b) the failure rates for Maori students among those who reach university... Unfortunately the two problems seem related. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
More RSS  RSS
 
 
 
 
Regional
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news