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Takimoana Government writes to UN


Takimoana Government

Office of Kaitiaki of Foreign and Intergovernmental Affairs, Takimoana Government, 8 Dennis Street, Gisborne, New Zealand.

Office of Henry Koia
Kaitiaki of Foreign and Intergovernmental Affairs
Kaitiaki of Land Administration
Kaituhi to the Takimoana Governing Council
6 February 2013
Ban Ki-moon
Secretary-General
C/- The Spokesperson for the Secretary-General
United Nations
BY EMAIL
Tena koe (greetings) Secretary-General

Re: Essay on the Maori right to self-determination

1. Today is Waitangi day in New Zealand. It is a day which is commemorated by New Zealanders to mark the significant historical event of the first signing of the Treaty of Waitangi on 6 February 1840. To informed Maori, the event marked the beginning of New Zealand’s colonization by the British. Today, modern New Zealand society as we know it is founded on the three pillars of Treaty dishonour, colonial terrorism and constitutional fraud. To commemorate Waitangi day 2012, I raised the Maori sovereignty flag on the Queen of England’s flagstaff at my local Courthouse in defiance of her Majesty’s authority to rule Maori peoples. To commemorate Waitangi day 2013, I think it befitting that I send to the Head of the United Nations, my essay entitled “Maori firms as enablers of Maori self-determination: What lies beyond the corporate horizon?”

2. The general theme of my essay is that indigenous Maori peoples have the right to self-determination, and that since Maori are subject to the conditions of imperfect de-colonization, Maori have the right to overthrow the Pakeha legal order through revolutionary change. My contribution to the international discourse on indigenous peoples’ self-determination is my theory of revolutionary tribalization outlined in my essay. The theory is applicable to indigenous tribal societies which are subject to the conditions of imperfect de-colonization. The theory asserts that the supremacy of tribal power must be a pre-condition of the realization of self-determination; that in an imperfect de-colonization situation, self-
2


empowerment through revolutionary change is the only way of realizing the pre-condition of power supremacy; and that the process of self-empowerment will require the overcoming of the mental, capability and political barriers.

3. While discussing the main theme of Maori self-determination, my essay postulates the argument that as knowledge disseminators and wealth generators, Maori firms have huge potential to fulfil a vital role as enablers of Maori self-determination given their propensity to adhere to traditional Maori values and their capacity to support all phases of the self-empowerment process espoused by revolutionary traibalization theory. The purpose of my essay, therefore, is to inspire a mind-shift within Maoridom by arguing that Maoridom must re-evaluate the role of the Maori firm in the post Treaty settlements era.

4. While I intend to take steps to disseminate my essay as widely as possible within Maoridom, I forward a copy to you in the meantime in the hope that it might be the catalyst for a mind-shift at the United Nations level in regards to international policy on promoting respect for indigenous rights, and in particular, the right to self-determination. I note your stated determination to see your organisation “deliver tangible, meaningful results that advance peace, development and human rights.” You will note from reading my essay that I have been somewhat critical of the “lackluster” efforts of your Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (EMRIP) in responding to my urgent call for it to conduct a case study on the Takimoana government as part of its work programme. If you think my criticisms of EMRIP are unjustified, then you are at liberty to put me right.

Mauri Ora (wellness to you)
Henry Koia
Kaitiaki of Foreign and Intergovernmental Affairs
Takimoana Government
New Zealand

http://img.scoop.co.nz/media/pdfs/1302/Maori_firms_as_enablers_of_Maori_selfdetermination__what_lies_beyond_the_corporate_horizon_6_February_2013.pdf


Copy to:
(1) Alberto Saldamando, International Indian Treaty Council
(2) All Kaitiaki on the Takimoana Governing Council
(3) All members of the New Zealand Parliament
(4) Ani Mikaere, Director of Maori Laws and Philosophy, Te Wananga-o-Raukawa
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(5) Apirana Mahuika, Chairman, Te Runanganui o Ngati Porou Trustee Limited
(6) Aroha Mead, Senior Lecturer, Victoria Management School, Victoria University
(7) Bob Kaa, Chairman, Ngati Ruawaipu Tribal Authority Trust
(8) Claire Charters, Secretariat to the United Nations Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples
(9) Dale Takitimu, Te Whanau-a-Apanui
(10) David V Williams, Professor, Auckland University
(11) Editor, Gisborne Herald
(12) Helen Clark, Administrator of the UNDP
(13) Here Titoko, Tuhoe communications
(14) James Anaya, UN Special Rapporteur on the rights of Indigenous Peoples
(15) Jane Kelsey, Professor, Auckland University
(16) Joanna Collinge, Executive Director, Human Rights Commission
(17) Jennifer Kraft, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights
(18) Jerry Mateparae, Governor-General of New Zealand
(19) Jason Koia, Kaitiaki of Treaties, Takimoana government
(20) Jody Wyllie, Mandated Negotiator for Rongowhakaata
(21) Kathrin Wessendorf, International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs
(22) Kenneth Deer, Indigenous World Association
(23) Lez Malezer, National Congress for Australia’s First Peoples
(24) Lucy Richardson, Permanent Mission of New Zealand to the United Nations Office in Geneva
(25) Maia Campbell, Senior Adviser to Prof. James Anaya
(26) Manu Caddie, District Councillor, Gisborne District Council
(27) Mattias Ahren, The Saami Council
(28) Meng Foon, Mayor of Gisborne
(29) Patricia Jimenez, Indigenous Peoples’ Centre for Documentation
(30) Paul Moon, Professor, AUT University
(31) Paul Tapsell, Professor, Otago University
(32) Rikirangi Gage, CEO Te Runanga o Te Whanau-a-Apanui
(33) Robert Joseph, Waikato University
(34) Robert Ruha, Te Whanau-a-Apanui
(35) Secretariat, United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues
(36) Shankar Limbu, Board Member of the UN Voluntary fund for indigenous populations
(37) Sian Elias, Chief Justice of New Zealand
(38) Tamati Kruger, Lead Negotiator for Tuhoe
(39) Tamati Reid, Kaihautu of the Takimoana government
(40) Tame Iti, The Ngai Tuhoe Ambassador
(41) Tom Bennion, Lawyer
(42) Tracey Whare, Aotearoa Indigenous Rights Trust
(43) Tui Marino, Te Aitanga-a-Hauiti Iwi Incorporated [Trust]
(44) Willie Te Aho, Mandated Negotiator for Rongowhakaata
(45) Wilton Littlechild, International Organisation of Indigenous Resource Development
(46) V Rajayogeswaran, Director, Global Peace Support Group
(47) Veronica Tawhai, Maori development lecturer, Massey University

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