Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Crime pays under TISA

Crime pays under TISA


“The Trade in Services Agreement (TISA) will help international crime syndicates if it is adopted,” says John Ring, Foreign Affairs spokesman for the New Zealand Democrats for Social Credit Party.

“Currently Australia, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Hong Kong, Iceland, Israel, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Norway, Panama, Pakistan, Peru, South Korea, Switzerland, Taiwan, Turkey, the United States, and the 27 member states of the European Union are negotiating the Trade in Services Agreement.

“There are two main influences behind these negotiations. One is that there are supposed to be negotiations about agriculture and development in the World Trade Organisation, but the United States and Europe don't want to negotiate on those issues, so they want other talks to discuss other things.

“By participating in these negotiations, New Zealand's government is accepting that strategy.

“The second big influence is that transnational corporations in banking, energy, insurance, telecommunications, transportation, water, and other services sectors, working through lobby groups like the US Coalition of Service Industries (USCSI) and the European Services Forum (ESF) have steadily lobbied negotiators to keep pushing a liberalization, deregulation and sometimes privatization agenda in industries such as transport, (tele-) communications, construction, retail, engineering, energy provision, water distribution, accountancy, marketing, publicity, banking, insurance, nature conservation, entertainment, museums, education, health, funeral services, and much more.

“There is an extreme level of confidentiality about these talks, and so far there have been no leaks.

“One area of concern relates to the combination of Switzerland, Colombia, and Mexico. Swiss banks try to attract criminals to be their customers, while Mexico and Colombia are major centres of illegal drug dealing. Further deregulating the financial sector would make it easier for them to do deals with each other,” says Mr Ring.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Mt Eden Prison: Serco Inquiry Extended

A two month delay to the Government investigation into prison fight clubs shows the extent of problems within the Serco circus, says Labour’s Corrections spokesperson Kelvin Davis. More>>

ALSO:

Health And Safety: Late Addition Of National Security Provisions A Concern

The New Zealand Law Society has expressed its significant concerns at the last-minute addition to the Health and Safety Reform Bill of provisions for a closed material procedure for court proceedings where national security is involved. More>>

ALSO:

Rugby And Beer: World Cup Alcohol Bill Passes

ACT MP David Seymour’s Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Extended licensing hours during Rugby World Cup) Bill completed its third reading by 99 to 21... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Flag Campaign

So far, the public has treated the government’s flag campaign with something between disinterest and disdain. Most New Zealanders have instinctively seen through the marketing hype involved. More>>

Change For 2017: Local Govt To Decide On Easter Sunday Trading

The Government is to enable local communities, through councils, to decide whether retailers can open on Easter Sunday, Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Woodhouse announced. More>>

ALSO:

(And Targets Worse Than Australia's): Foresters Abandoning Emissions Trading Scheme

The Government’s gutting of the Emissions Trading Scheme has caused foresters to leave and emissions to rise, says Labour’s Climate Change spokesperson Megan Woods. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news