Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Oxfam welcomes NZ offer on Pacific labour mobility

See Oxfam NZ website at www.oxfam.org.nz


MEDIA RELEASE: October 25, 2006

Oxfam welcomes New Zealand's offer on Pacific labour mobility

Oxfam New Zealand welcomes the New Zealand government's announcement today to open up more opportunities for Pacific workers seeking seasonal work in New Zealand. The seasonal labour scheme will not only contribute to the New Zealand economy, especially in important sectors such as horticulture, but also create real benefits for the workers, their families and the economies of our Pacific neighbours.

Barry Coates, Executive Director of Oxfam New Zealand said: "It's particularly welcome that the scheme will address some of the potential problems with temporary work programmes that have been identified from New Zealand's past experience and other seasonal worker schemes."

Under the scheme that begins in 2007, New Zealand employers will be able to recruit up to 5,000 workers from Pacific Islands Forum nations. Successful applicants can stay in New Zealand for a period of up to seven months. The scheme obliges employers to pay half of each worker's airfare to New Zealand, provide suitable accommodation and translation, and pay market rates.

In 2005, the World Bank reported that remittances sent home by overseas workers to developing countries around the world amounted to US$167 billion [253 billion NZD] – twice the level of all overseas development aid. In the Pacific, nearly a third of Tonga and Samoa's national income comes from remittances. Creating opportunities for more Pacific workers to work in New Zealand can contribute to economic and social development in Pacific countries. Recent studies have confirmed that people use remittances to fund improved housing, school fees for their children, and investment in small business enterprises.

Oxfam welcomes that this initiative is a partnership agreement between New Zealand and its Pacific neighbours, rather than created within the restrictive framework of regional trade negotiations. It is vitally important that the future development of this scheme should not be used as a bargaining chip to gain more trade concessions from the Pacific.

Coates says: "It is welcome that New Zealand has taken this initiative at a time that Australia has rejected Pacific calls for greater access for seasonal workers. Pacific governments, particularly in Melanesia, are struggling to create enough jobs for the growing numbers of school leavers. Making seasonal work more accessible for Pacific Islanders has the potential to add opportunities for several thousand seasonal workers annually when it is introduced in April 2007, and there is the potential to expand the scheme in future."

"Increased labour mobility can contribute to addressing the many challenges faced by Pacific Island states. However, this seasonal work scheme is not a replacement for New Zealand living up to its international commitments to increase its development aid spending. More aid is essential as an investment in the Pacific, to promote improved rural livelihoods, income generation and provision of essential services like health, education and water."

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines


Gordon Campbell: On Whether Spotify Can Save Itself; Plus A Playlist


Spotify has to be one of the most interestingly futile mouse-wheels of 21st century capitalism. Run, run, run goes the Spotify mouse but it never, ever makes a profit. For reasons set out below, it maybe never will. But it won’t be for wont of trying. Reportedly, Spotify’s music library contains 70 million tracks and it adds 60,000 more each day. By some estimates it adds on average, one new track every 1.4 seconds. (No wonder it's so hard to keep up with new music.) Spotify has 345 million active users, and 155 million of them have been willing to pay a subscription in order to enjoy their music ad-free. Ads are not a major driver of company revenue...
More>>



Alastair Thompson: Are There TPLF Ethiopia Insurgency Training & Support Operations in Uganda?


Mystery Document Alleges:
Covert Operation has US/Egypt Support
Operations Coordinated between South Sudan, TPLF and Uganda
Planning began December 2021...

More>>




 
 

Government: Action To Tackle Delays In Family Court
New legislation aimed at tackling delays in the family justice system, will help improve the wellbeing of thousands of children caught up in Family Court disputes every year, Justice Minister Kiri Allan says... More>>


Prime Minister: Chatham House Speech
What an honour it is to be back in London, and to be here at Chatham house. This visit represents much for me. The reopening of borders and resumption of travel after a difficult few years... More>>


Government: New Zealand Secures Major Free Trade Deal With European Union
New Zealand and the European Union have concluded negotiations on a major free trade agreement (FTA), which unlocks access to one of the world’s biggest and most lucrative markets... More>>

ALSO:



Economy: Financial Statements Of The Government Of New Zealand
Please note the next Financial Statements of the Government of New Zealand to be released will be for the full year ended 30 June 2022. It is anticipated that these will be released in early October 2022... More>>



Government: New Era For Better Health In Aotearoa New Zealand

The Government has today delivered a nationwide health system that will ensure better outcomes for all New Zealanders with the establishment of Te Whatu Ora - Health New Zealand... More>>



Greens: Alcohol Harm Minimisation Bill Pulled From Biscuit Tin

After years of research and advocacy, Parliament will finally consider legislation to take meaningful action on alcohol harm, says the Greens... More>>


 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels