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Customer Experience the Vital Piece of the Business Puzzle

Customer Experience the Vital Piece of the Business Puzzle

Business is still not making customers their number one priority and as a result a concerning trend is developing that has the potential to significantly impact business performance.

Business is viewing the improvement of a customer experience strategy as a reactive task. A task that reluctantly must be contemplated when all else fails, rather than a critical part of a successful business plan according to Chris Bell Managing Director of Customer Experiences a company specialising in the development of quality customer experiences.

As businesses face increased competition, pressure on price and a decline in customer loyalty they are reluctantly concluding that a need to refocus their attention on the customer and the quality and consistency of the experience is what is possibly required.

This reactive response is not only making the task that much more difficult, it’s starting to be seen by customers for what it is, a “have to do” rather than a proactive genuine desire to put the customer first.

In today’s highly competitive and commoditised world, businesses without a customer experience strategy as part of a business plan will struggle. A customer experience strategy impacts every area of a business not just the service quality delivered at the front counter.

One of the reasons businesses have not contemplated the development of their customer experience is the lack of know-how.
As a result businesses have tried to improve just some of the immediate areas within their business that are not performing.
One example has been the reactive response to customer complaints as a result of poor service levels. The response has been to send their front-line people on a customer service training workshop to improve their customer service skills.

We know from the evaluations we have carried out that this approach at best only delivers short term results and is very much a cost rather than an investment and in many cases is viewed as punishment by those involved rather than a skill development opportunity.

Research confirms that companies providing exceptional service have a strong competitive advantage. Customers are prepared to pay higher prices, make additional purchases, are more loyal and recommend the business to others. These benefits can boost a business’s bottom line significantly.
In today’s market the customer has all the power, a result of the huge amount of choice now available.
What proactive businesses are focusing on is using the development of their unique customer experience to enable them to stand out from the crowd rather than just to be in the game.

In 2013 business must realise that in a world of excess, uniformity and repetition, people buy experiences, not products or services. When people feel good about their experiences, they will not only return but will tell their friends and many others via social media. Get it wrong and today many more will hear about it via the same social media channels.

Customer Experiences has just made the process of improving service levels easier through the release of an affordable fully supported customer experience development program available online


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