Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


End Insecurity

1 December 2012

Media Release:

End Insecurity
Campaign launch

Outside First Security, Cnr Carbine Rd and Arthur Brown St 10am Wednesday 5th December 2012

Unite Union is launching a campaign to publicise the awful treatment of workers employed in New Zealand's unregulated security industry.

Security here is renowned for –

No training; minimum wages; poor job security; variable pay; insecure hours; abuse of employment rights; abuse of immigration policy; abuse of breaks; long unsociable hours; unmitigated dangers on the job and no backup when things go wrong.

Underlying all this is a deep disrespect for the workers across the industry.

“We’ve had a gutsful of dealing incessantly with problems that should never occur in any workplace” says Unite National Director Mike Treen. “Across the industry workers are bullied and treated like disposable commodities”.

The focus of the campaign will be the two largest security companies – First Security and ADT/Armourguard – with another nasty employer, Rush Security, also in the firing line.

The larger companies should set a decent example but they are often the worst offenders. They are large multinational companies which employ New Zealanders at minimum rates and send the profits offshore. They resist decent pay and conditions of employment.

Underlying the problem is the lack of regulation.

“There is no other comparable country where a person can pull on a security uniform with no training whatever and be on a job immediately.”

A security company can be run from the boot of a car with guards put on sites without even basic communications equipment and no regard whatever for their health or safety.

The conditions around the employment and death of security guard Charanpreet Dhaliwal Singh, 22 in West Auckland late last year are typical of the cheap and nasty nature of security in New Zealand. Singh was untrained and working his first night at a Fulton Hogan site in West Auckland without basic equipment when he was attacked and killed.

No training, no backup, no communications, no pay, no respect, no dignity - and no government interest – that’s security in New Zealand.

At the heart of the problem is the vicious competition between companies for contracts whereby they compete to pay the least and provide the nastiest conditions of employment.

Ultimately the New Zealand government must regulate this grubby, dog-eat-dog industry because instead of fighting the government these companies prefer to bully the workers with low pay and pitiable conditions of employment.

This cowboy behaviour would not be tolerated in elsewhere.

The changes we want to see are:
• Safety for guards as the first priority.
• Mandatory paid training for all guards BEFORE putting on a uniform and on-going paid training afterwards.
• Specialist Health and Safety trained staff in every company.
• Specialist Personnel Management staff in every company.
• Minimum wage rates across the industry.
• Security of hours across the industry.

Without these changes we will see more guards abused, killed and injured while company bullies turn a blind eye.

The Unite campaign will consist of:
• Community pickets of the companies listed above starting Wednesday 5th December (at First Security, Cnr Carbine Road and Arthur Brown Street, Mt Wellington) and continuing indefinitely.
• Leafleting to tell the public about the industry and seek their support for change.
• Approaches to the Minister of Justice to regulate this rogue industry as is done overseas in places like the UK and Australia.
• Regular bulletins over the next two months to highlight specific abuses of security workers and their rights.
• A media conference part-way through the campaign to give specific examples of the state of the industry.

© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Postnatal Depression: 'The Thief That Steals Motherhood' - Alison McCulloch

Post-natal depression is a sly and cruel illness, described by one expert as ‘the thief that steals motherhood’, it creeps up on its victims, hiding behind the stress and exhaustion of being a new parent, catching many women unaware and unprepared. More>>


DIY: Kiwi Ingenuity And Masking Tape Saves Chick

Kiwi ingenuity and masking tape has saved a Kiwi chick after its egg was badly damaged endangering the chick's life. The egg was delivered to Kiwi Encounter at Rainbow Springs in Rotorua 14 days ago by a DOC worker with a large hole in its shell and against all odds has just successfully hatched. More>>


Trade: Key To Lead Mission To India; ASEAN FTA Review Announced

Prime Minister John Key will lead a trade delegation to India next week, saying the pursuit of a free trade agreement with the protectionist giant is "the primary reason we're going" but playing down the likelihood of early progress. More>>



MYOB: Digital Signatures Go Live

From today, Inland Revenue will begin accepting “digital signatures”, saving businesses and their accountants a huge amount of administration time and further reducing the need for pen and paper in the workplace. More>>

Oil Searches: Norway's Statoil Quits Reinga Basin

Statoil, the Norwegian state-owned oil company, has given up oil and gas exploration in Northland's Reinga Basin, saying the probably of a find was 'too low'. More>>


Modern Living: Auckland Development Blowouts Reminiscent Of Run Up To GFC

The collapse of property developments in Auckland is "almost groundhog day" to the run-up of the global financial crisis in 2007/2008 as banks refuse to fund projects due to blowouts in construction and labour costs, says John Kensington, the author of KPMG's Financial Institutions Performance Survey. More>>


Health: New Zealand's First ‘No Sugary Drinks’ Logo Unveiled

New Zealand’s first “no sugary drinks logo” has been unveiled at an event in Wellington... It will empower communities around New Zealand to lift their health and wellbeing and send a clear message about the damage caused by too much sugar in our diets. More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news