Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Smith green-lights Tauranga port dredging plan

Conservation Minister Smith green-lights Tauranga port dredging plan

March 5 (BusinessDesk) - Conservation Minister Nick Smith has given the green light for Port of Tauranga to widen and deepen its shipping channels, creating space to let in bigger vessels.

The minister granted resource consent after local iwi blocked the plan under the old Resource Management Act for four years, Smith said in a statement. The consents mean Port of Tauranga can dredge the entrance and shipping lanes to allow 'S' class vessels.

"I have granted these consents, on the recommendation of the Environment Court, because of the importance for New Zealand of efficient shipping services," Smith said. "I am disappointed that it has taken nearly four years for a final decision to be made on these consents."

The port has been keen on beginning the dredging to allow bigger vessels to use the hub to open up larger trade routes that the New Zealand Shippers' Council estimates could be worth up to $338 million a year.

Port chief executive Mark Cairns said the bigger ships' better fuel efficiency will "enhance the competitiveness of New Zealand exporters and provide lower freight costs for importers."

The first stage of dredging will cost between $40 million and $50 million and will start near the end of the year. It's expected to take six months to complete.

That will let ships with a capacity of 5,000 to 6,000 twenty food equivalent containers (TEUs) access the port, which currently accommodates ships of 4,500 TEUs.

The second stage will accommodate 8,200 TEU ships.

The resource consent's conditions include the setting up of a trust with local iwi to set priorities and set aside funding for future harbour improvements, a minimum separation distance of the dredging from Te Kuia Rock, the development of a Kaimoana Restoration Programme to mitigate the effects on local seafood especially the pipi beds, the setting up of tertiary and post graduate research to promote better environment health in the harbour.

The port's shares increased 0.3 percent to $13.74 today, and have gained 6.3 percent this year.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Cosmetics & Pollution: Proposal To Ban Microbeads

Cosmetic products containing microbeads will be banned under a proposal announced by the Minister for the Environment today. Marine scientists have been advocating for a ban on the microplastics, which have been found to quickly enter waterways and harm marine life. More>>

ALSO:

NIWA: 2016 New Zealand’s Warmest Year On Record

Annual temperatures were above average (0.51°C to 1.20°C above the annual average) throughout the country, with very few locations observing near average temperatures (within 0.5°C of the annual average) or lower. The year 2016 was the warmest on record for New Zealand, based on NIWA’s seven-station series which begins in 1909. More>>

ALSO:

Farewell 2016: NZ Economy Flies Through 2016's Political Curveballs

Dec. 23 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's economy batted away some curly political curveballs of 2016 to end the year on a high note, with its twin planks of a booming construction sector and rampant tourism soon to be joined by a resurgent dairy industry. More>>

ALSO:


NZ Economy: More Growth Than Expected In 3rd Qtr

Dec. 22 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's economy grew at a faster pace than expected in the September quarter as a booming construction sector continued to underpin activity, spilling over into related building services, and was bolstered by tourism and transport ... More>>

  • NZ Govt - Solid growth for NZ despite fragile world economy
  • NZ Council of Trade Unions - Government needs to ensure economy raises living standards
  • KiwiRail Goes Deisel: Cans electric trains on partially electrified North Island trunkline

    Dec. 21 (BusinessDesk) – KiwiRail, the state-owned rail and freight operator, said a small fleet of electric trains on New Zealand’s North Island would be phased out over the next two years and replaced with diesel locomotives. More>>

  • KiwiRail - KiwiRail announces fleet decision on North Island line
  • Greens - Ditching electric trains massive step backwards
  • Labour - Bill English turns ‘Think Big’ into ‘Think Backwards’
  • First Union - Train drivers condemn KiwiRail’s return to “dirty diesel”
  • NZ First - KiwiRail Going Backwards for Xmas
  • NIWA: The Year's Top Science Findings

    Since 1972 NIWA has operated a Clean Air Monitoring Station at Baring Head, near Wellington... In June, Baring Head’s carbon dioxide readings officially passed 400 parts per million (ppm), a level last reached more than three million years ago. More>>

    ALSO:

    Get More From Scoop

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Business
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news