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Businessman sentenced for tax evasion and money laundering

18 February 2014

Businessman sentenced for tax evasion and money laundering

Inland Revenue has welcomed the sentencing of a Hawkes Bay businessman after he admitted using his employees’ bank accounts to evade paying $196,000 in tax.

Ahmet Dindar was sentenced in the Napier District Court today to six months home detention and 200 hours community service after he had plead guilty to four representative charges – one each for evading income tax, evading GST, filing false income tax returns and engaging in money laundering.

Group Manager Investigations and Advice, Patrick Goggin, said that Inland Revenue began its investigation into Dindar’s companies, Anatolia Napier Limited and Café Anatolia Limited, in November 2012 after receiving information regarding his activities.

“Our investigation found that Dindar used these two companies to run a chain of kebab shops throughout Hawkes Bay. He admitted that he took cash sales from his shop tills which he deposited into the bank accounts of his staff or his own personal account.

“The outcome was that this money did not show up on the bank statements for himself or the companies and therefore the tax returns that were filed with Inland Revenue were false.

“Not only did he hide money in other people's bank accounts, but in some instances it was sent to Turkey and used for his personal expenses, and this was why he was also charged with money laundering”

Between 2009 and 2012, Dindar supressed just over $500,000 in sales from his businesses, although he has since repaid the tax owed to Inland Revenue.

“This was a deliberate attempt by Dindar to reduce the amount of tax both he and his businesses would have to pay by not declaring his income and hiding cash in other people's bank accounts.

“This case also shows that Inland Revenue acts on information that it receives and there is an expectation amongst New Zealanders that those who break the rules will be caught.

"Businesses and individuals doing the right thing can be confident that Inland Revenue will take action against those who are found to be evading their obligations,” Mr Goggin said.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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