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Wind power generation system could be built into cities

New INVELOX wind power generation system could be built into cities

A NEW wind power generation system is so safe it can be built alongside existing city buildings, reducing power transportation costs, according to the concept developer.

On Tuesday May 13, at the University of Auckland's Urban Transformations Seminar Series, Dr Daryoush Allaei will give a speech on the award-winning INVELOX system, a new form of wind generation which brings the wind to the generator instead of putting the generator in the wind.

Through the system, a funnel draws wind through pipes, down into commercially available turbine-generator systems, which convert it into electricity. “Instead of snatching bits of energy from the wind as it passes through the blades of a rotor, INVELOX captures the wind and directs it.”

As no pivoting turbine or moving components are needed at the intake Allaei says "wind generation structures can be built right next to and inside cities safely and economically"

Towers only need to be half as tall as traditional wind generation structures and Allaei says they can even be retrofitted or built into new highrise buildings.

The generators are able to keep working with winds traveling at 3.2 KPH while traditional generators require winds of 14 KPH.

Extremely economical, a single tower can generate up to 25 MW of electrical power at 1.5 cents per KWh while costing less to service.

Allaei will present an overview of the technology as well as recent field data from US tests on May 13 from 6-8pm at a free public seminar at the University of Auckland, Engineering Building, Room 401-401, 20 Symonds Street.


ends

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