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Kiwis want to be active in the workplace

Kiwis want to be active in the workplace

Employee mobility and confidence increases in Q1

Auckland, May 2014: Kiwi workers believe there is a strong link between performance in the workplace and staying in shape, with 70% of employees saying the quality of their work benefits when they exercise regularly, according to recruitment and HR services specialists, Randstad.

Despite the latest OECD Better Life Index showing that 89% of New Zealanders believe they are in good health, the Randstad Workmonitor reveals over one fifth (17%) of local workers don’t feel as if they have enough energy to go to work each day.

Interestingly, more than most other nations, Kiwi workers view staying fit as primarily a personal responsibility, with 95% saying maintaining a healthy lifestyle is their own prerogative. Organised sport is also the most likely way local workers will stay fit outside of the office, with 67% believing playing sports is the main priority for maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

Paul Robinson, Director at Randstad New Zealand, says it’s important people find the time to remain fit and active, and they should be open with their employers about the measures they’re taking to do so.

“Kiwis have always placed importance on being fit and healthy, and it’s no surprise most of us believe this impacts other areas of our lives. While many of us have busy schedules, it’s important we don’t use our jobs as an excuse to let unhealthy habits creep into our lives.

“Instead we should all be working with our employers to add these habits into our daily routines. Whether it’s playing sport, joining a running group or going to the gym, it’s up to employees and businesses to work together to ensure everyone is as healthy and happy as possible”, says Robinson.

Encouragingly, the survey highlights that many workplaces already implement strategies to help their employees stay fit, with 62% of workers saying their current employer actively supports a healthy lifestyle.

However 70% of employees noted they were not allowed to play in a sporting team during office hours, and only 32% noted their employer currently subsidises gym or fitness group memberships.

Paul Robinson says while it’s good that employers are promoting healthy habits, workplaces around the nation should focus on developing proactive health programs.

“Employees who are fit both mentally and physically will have more energy, be more effective and efficient, and enjoy their work more. A fit, healthy and happy workforce can have a surprising impact on workplace productivity as well as retention rates, so creating a strong work-life culture in your office, along with actively implementing healthy living programs, should be a focus for businesses in every industry.

“The good news is these programs can be easily implemented, require minimal investment and can be a great way to not only improve performance, but also build engagement and camaraderie amongst staff.

“Healthy living programs can also have other business benefits which might not be immediately obvious. A sporting team for instance can also help build a stronger culture in the office, improve productivity and allow for networking and interaction, particularly in large businesses where some departments don’t usually interact,” says Robinson.

Employee mobility increases The latest Randstad Mobility Index, which reveals jobseeker confidence each quarter, has climbed from 99 to 101 in Q1 2014 compared to Q4 2013.

This is due in part to job security increasing slightly over the last quarter, with 4% of respondents citing job loss as a significant fear.

The portion of New Zealanders actively seeking a new job has increased to 9, a 3% rise since Q3 in 2013. Employee confidence of finding a comparable job within six months has continued to remain steady in New Zealand since the middle of 2013. Two thirds (67%) of employees are confident of doing so, a figure that has risen 2 percentage points since the start of 2013.

“The first quarter of this year has seen a continued rise in jobseeker confidence and mobility. This is largely due to high economic stability and growth within a number of sectors which is driven by the Christchurch rebuild and the increase in government construction-based projects,” says Robinson.

“It is great to see job seeker confidence continue to grow in response to our stabilising economy and we predict there will be further movement among the workforce as Kiwi begin to look for new opportunities.”

- ENDS -

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