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New Zealand’s leading exporter adopts Trade Single Window

New Zealand’s leading exporter adopts Trade Single Window


New Zealand dairy co-operative Fonterra has signed up for the Trade Single Window, New Zealand’s new electronic border for trade.

Customs Deputy Comptroller Transformation and Technology, Robert Lake, says this is a major milestone in the roll out of the Joint Border Management System.

“Fonterra saw the benefits of sending and receiving export documentation directly through Customs’ Trade Single Window. They have reduced the costs associated with sending data through a third party, and adopted the more modern and reliable Trade Single Window connection service sooner rather than later,” said Mr Lake.

Fonterra is using the Trade Single Window to submit export documentation using the world standard data format which contains the goods and craft information required by border agencies internationally.

“In the first week 970 Fonterra export lodgements passed through the Trade Single Window, with an average response time of around 30 seconds.”

Trade Single Window currently covers 100% of outward messages and 35% of inward messages, and to date has handled over 400,000 transactions. Industry can choose to transfer over to the new system now, or they can continue to use existing border systems until JBMS becomes mandatory.

Fonterra’s Documentation Manager, Clyde Fletcher, says “We have taken a long term view and see the combined Trade Single Window platform and WCO data model as a strategic enabler that will have global benefits for our business.”

The Trade Single Window will ultimately provide a single channel for importers and exporters to comply with New Zealand’s border requirements, and, longer term, support sharing of data between countries to facilitate trade. It will reduce compliance costs, and improve border security through the supply of data that supports risk management.

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