Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Auckland wharf decision secures tourism future


The international cruise industry has welcomed a decision to improve berthing facilities at Auckland’s Queens Wharf, which will provide much needed certainty for New Zealand’s cruise sector.

Approval for the construction of two temporary mooring points known as dolphins will ensure Auckland is able to cater to all types of cruise vessels and allow continued growth in cruise-related tourism, which is worth $491 million a year to the national economy.

Cruise Lines International Association (CLIA) Australasia Managing Director Joel Katz said the decision was a step forward not just for Auckland, but for destinations around New Zealand.

“As the international gateway to New Zealand, Auckland’s current berthing restrictions are hampering cruise operations and threatening to limit economic growth both locally and in other regions,” Mr Katz said. “The decision to increase the capacity of Queens Wharf will mean larger ships can safely berth in Auckland and make onward visits to ports all over the country, bringing enormous economic benefits.”

Queens Wharf is currently unable to accommodate cruise ships longer than 294m. Ships between 295m and 320-330m can berth at the nearby Princes Wharf, but this is dependent on wind conditions and does not involve dedicated terminal or border processing facilities.

Cruise ships larger than 320-330m are unable to berth in Auckland at all. Those that do visit must anchor in Waitematā harbour and transfer passengers and crew to shore aboard tender boats.

“Auckland Council and its development arm Panuku have wisely recognised that the current situation is unsustainable and Auckland has been at risk of losing its place in international cruise itineraries, particularly as new larger ships join the world fleet,” Mr Katz said.

“The solution planned for Queens Wharf is a relatively common technique used in ports around the world and provides for an increase in capacity without having to extend the pier. It will allow Auckland to join other cities internationally in welcoming all types of cruise ships and ensures New Zealand’s cruise tourism sector continues to thrive while long-term facilities are developed.”

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Up 0.5% In June Quarter: Services Lead GDP Growth

“Service industries, which represent about two-thirds of the economy, were the main contributor to GDP growth in the quarter, rising 0.7 percent off the back of a subdued result in the March 2019 quarter.” More>>

ALSO:

Pickers: Letter To Immigration Minister From Early Harvesting Growers

A group of horticultural growers are frustrated by many months of inaction by the Minister who has failed to announce additional immigrant workers from overseas will be allowed into New Zealand to assist with harvesting early stage crops such as asparagus and strawberries. More>>

ALSO:

Non-Giant Fossil Disoveries: Scientists Discover One Of World’s Oldest Bird Species

At 62 million-years-old, the newly-discovered Protodontopteryx ruthae, is one of the oldest named bird species in the world. It lived in New Zealand soon after the dinosaurs died out. More>>

Rural Employers Keen, Migrants Iffy: Employment Visa Changes Announced

“We are committed to ensuring that businesses are able to get the workers they need to fill critical skills shortages, while encouraging employers and regions to work together on long term workforce planning including supporting New Zealanders with the training they need to fill the gaps,” says Iain Lees-Galloway. More>>

ALSO:

Marsden Pipeline Rupture: Report Calls For Supply Improvements, Backs Digger Blame

The report makes several recommendations on how the sector can better prevent, prepare for, respond to, and recover from an incident. In particular, we consider it essential that government and industry work together to put in place and regularly practise sector-wide response plans, to improve the response to any future incident… More>>

ALSO: