Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Film Industry Recommendations Should Include More Workers


Film Industry Working Group Recommendations Should Include a Wider Group of Screen Workers


For Immediate Release

17 June 2019

The Directors & Editors Guild of NZ welcomes the Government’s initial response to the Film Industry Group (FIWG) recommendations, but feels that the proposed changes should apply to protect a wider group of workers in the screen industry.

“As currently outlined, the narrow application of the changes leaves the majority of directors and editors and many other screen workers out of collective bargaining,” said DEGNZ President Howard Taylor. “Those it applies to are generally already the most well paid with the best terms and conditions.”

“Explotiation of screen workers including directors and editors occurs most frequently in the online, reality and factual screen sectors. Under the proposed carve-out, new and mid-level practitioners will not be protected by any minimum standards, and will continue to suffer from poor working conditions and renumeration”

In a recent survey, Creative New Zealand and New Zealand On Air identified that the median personal annual income for creative professionals is around $35,800 – compared to $51,800 for all New Zealanders earning a wage or salary. When you take away other sources of income, the median income from creative work is only $15,000.

DEGNZ fully supports the two bodies joint strategic initiatives to improve the wellbeing of creative professionals, namely:

• Fair reward– working towards:
o ensuring lower-paid creative professionals are paid in line with technical professionals
o lifting pay to the point where creative professionals start to feel it is a fair reward for their work.
• Sustainability – working to make the careers of mid-career and established creative professionals more sustainable through more continuous creative endeavours.
• Emerging creative professionals – working with the sector (including peak bodies and guilds) to find better ways to support creative professionals at the start of their career.

“We welcome the opportunity to work with Government during drafting of the legislation to expand the coverage of the changes” Taylor added. “Bringing as many screen workers as possible into collective bargaining would help to build a sustainable and vibrant creative sector in New Zealand.”

ENDS



© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Emission Statement: No New Coal Boilers For Fonterra

Fonterra is shaving eleven years off its coal target, as it announces a new commitment to reduce its reliance on coal. More>>

ALSO:

Long Time Coming: Soil Turned On Waimea Dam

After almost 20 years of planning and a 'gruelling' process to keep the project on track, the Waimea Community Dam, one of the Tasman District's largest-ever projects, is now under way. More>>

Where's My Drone Pizza: Govt's Drone Plan 'Will Help Economy Take Off'

The paper Taking Flight: an aviation system for the automated age sets out the Government’s vision for how drones can be better integrated into the current transport system to develop a thriving, innovative and safe sector. More>>

ALSO:

Up 17.% In June Year: Fuel And Rent Drive Inflation

The consumers price index (CPI) rose 0.6 percent in the June 2019 quarter, due to higher prices for petrol and rent, Stats NZ said today. More>>

ALSO: