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Correct equipment should be available and used

Correct equipment should be available and used

WorkSafe says that industries need to be supplying their workers with the correct equipment to do the job safely.

The message comes after Broadspectrum (New Zealand) Limited was sentenced today in the Christchurch District Court.

The sentencing follows an incident in February 2015 where a worker of Broadspectrum (New Zealand) Limited, formerly known as Transfield Services (New Zealand) Limited, received an electric shock while testing an electricity transformer.

The worker sustained a burn to their right arm and an exit wound from the shock.

WorkSafe’s investigation into the incident found that Broadspectrum had failed to ensure the correct testing equipment for the task at hand was available and used and that a safe operating procedure was in place for the testing work.

The worker was provided with incorrect testing clips and was also instructed to stand on top of the transformer at the time of the incident.

“Electric shock is a primary and well known risk in the industry in which Broadspectrum works. Using the correct testing equipment and procedures could have avoided the incident altogether” commented WorkSafe’s Chief Inspector Response and Investigations Keith Stewart.

“The voltage of the shock, which could have been up to 10,000V could have resulted in a fatality. The incident is a stern reminder for those working with electricity to ensure they are using best practice procedures and safety measures”.

Broadspectrum (New Zealand) Limited was fined $42,000 and ordered to pay reparations to the victim of $17,000.

Notes:

- The final fine imposed was $42,000.
- The court ordered reparation of a total of $17,000 to the victim.
- Broadspectrum was charged under section 163D of the Electricity Act 1992.
- The maximum penalty under sections under section 163D of the Electricity Act 1992 is a fine not exceeding $250,000.

ENDS

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