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Overseas Trips Rise 20 Per Cent

External Migration: November 2000

New Zealand residents departed on 112,960 short-term overseas trips in November 2000, up 18,660 or 20 per cent on November 1999. This large increase was due partly to lower airfares and attractive travel packages in November 2000. There were more trips to Australia (up 8,540 or 17 per cent), China (up 980 or 79 per cent), Japan (up 630 or 66 per cent) and the United Kingdom (up 610 or 23 percent), and for the first time in seven months, since the political crisis in May, there were also more trips to Fiji (up 1,170 or 30 per cent).

In November 2000 there were 182,320 overseas visitor arrivals, 13,010 or 8 per cent more than in November 1999. Asia (up 3,890), Australia (up 3,030) and Europe (up 2,640) accounted for three-quarters of this increase.

During the November 2000 year, there were 1.751 million overseas visitor arrivals, up 154,000 or 10 per cent on last year.

Permanent and long-term arrivals exceeded departures by 840 in November 2000, down a third on the net gain of 1,210 in November 1999. There was a net outflow to Australia (1,730), but net inflows from the United Kingdom (1,040), China (370) and India (230).

In the year ended November 2000, there were 63,060 permanent and long-term arrivals, up 4,200 or 7 per cent on the previous year, and 72,700 departures, up 4,350 or 6 per cent. This resulted in a net outflow of 9,640, up slightly on last year's net outflow of 9,500. There were net losses to Australia (26,440) and the United Kingdom (1,200), but net gains from China (5,180), India (2,150), South Africa (2,130) and Japan (1,970).

Dianne Macaskill DEPUTY GOVERNMENT STATISTICIAN END


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