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NIWA: National Climate Summary


National Climate Summary – October 2007: Stormy and generally cold with frequent spring gales

• Wind: Much more wind than normal, with frequent gales from the westerly sector
• Temperature: Well below average in the South Island and parts of the North Island, above average in Hawke’s Bay and parts of the north
• Rainfall: Above normal in many regions, especially in the South Island
• Sunshine: Near or above normal in most regions

October 2007 was rather stormy and generally cold with deep depressions tracking south of New Zealand and frequent westerly gales. This was the equal 4th windiest October overall in regard to westerlies in measurements that commenced in 1966. Wind gusts over 130 km/h were recorded on 13 days (42%) in the month. In fact, many stations had at least 7 more days with strong winds (with gusts to 60 km/h or more) than is average for the time of year.

Temperatures were below average throughout much of the South Island, and the southern North Island. In contrast average or above average temperatures occurred in the north and east of the North Island. The national average temperature of 11.7 ºC was 0.5 °C below average.

Rainfall was almost 200 percent (twice) of normal in parts of north Westland, at Hanmer Forest, and inland parts of north Canterbury, and above normal in many other regions, especially in the South Island. Only in the Far North was rainfall about 50 percent (half) of normal. This produced soil moisture surpluses in Fiordland, Gisborne, and Wairarapa. Significant soil moisture deficits (more than 110 mm) occurred toward the end of the month in parts of Marlborough and Central Otago (normal for the time of year).

The month was much sunnier than usual in Northland, Gisborne, north Canterbury, Otago, and Southland

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