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Artists explore diversity through art

Artists explore diversity through art

A new exhibition opening next week at Hawera’s Lysaght Watt Gallery will showcase recent work by a number of South Taranaki visual artists. Diverse Locals brings together work by 45 artists with the aim to showcase the wide range of skills, creative strengths and scope of subject and media they use.

Exhibition curator, South Taranaki District Council Arts Co-ordinator, Michaela Stoneman, says the visual arts can show us a lot about identity; how art can help to define who we are and how we respond to where we live, either in the context of rural communities, New Zealand or globally.

“We have a very clever bunch of artists working in our communities. I’m constantly blown away by their commitment, their contribution to our social framework and the vast range of skills they demonstrate through their work. Diverse Locals will celebrate all of this,” says Michaela.

Works will include painting, sculpture, weaving, printmaking, fibre, photography, glass, assemblage, drawing and collage. A school programme will engage local schools with exhibition tours and hands-on art activities in response to the work. The featured artists live throughout the South Taranaki district, including Waverley, Oeo, Warea, Ohawe, Patea, Opunake, Hawera, Eltham, Pungarehu and Whenuakura.

“This show extends on the spirit of Te Ngira: New Zealand Diversity Action Programme run by the Human Rights Commission, to consciously recognise the cultural diversity of our society, promote the equal enjoyment by everyone of their civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights and foster harmonious relations between diverse peoples. The work of artists can actively express what inspires them while reflecting who they are,” Stoneman says.

The South Taranaki artists featured in the exhibition are: Aaron Tippett, Barbara Clegg, Beck White, Bianca Mitchell, Bonita Bigham, Bonnie McIntee, Carl Fairweather, Caryl Murray, Cath Sheard, Cherie Do Vale, Cecilia Russell, Celeste & Mike Cole, Claire Jensen, Claire Whiston, Dale Copeland, Dimmie Danielewski, Dora Baker, Erryn Willcox, Errin Rita, Gabrielle Belz, Gaby Mullholland, Gail Thompson, Jennifer Laracy, Jimi Walsh, Jonny de Painter, Karen Dey, Lisa Walsh, Maree Liddington, Maree Stowe, Marianne Muggeridge, Mark Bellringer, Milli Purpil, Myfanwy Morris, Nicky Gray, Paul Burgham, Paul Hutchinson, Philip Nuku, Puhu Nuku, Rachael Johnson, Rhegan Brooks, Roger Morris, Scott Hayman, Terry Ashford and Viv Davy.

“All are welcome to the official opening at 6pm, Tuesday 6 March - come along, enjoy refreshments and meet the artist behind the work.”

The Exhibition runs until 29 March 2018 at Lysaght Watt Gallery, 6 Union St, Hawera (beside the Town Square).

ENDS

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