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Ground Breaking Education Unit For Cashmere High

Ground Breaking Education Unit For Cashmere High

A ground-breaking education unit for students with motor disorders and development delays is to be built at Cashmere High School.

Arrow Christchurch will build the Conductive Education Unit, one of the first stand alone secondary school units of its type in the world.

Conductive Education is a system of rehabilitation for people with motor disorders and development delay whose disability has been caused by damage to the central nervous system.

The project originates back in 2000 when Cashmere High School was selected as the host school for the Conductive Education Unit.

“From the outset, it was apparent the project was going to be a complex one because of the specialised requirements of the facility,” said Cashmere High School Principal Dave Turnbull.

Because of the school’s previous successful experience and involvement with Arrow, Mr Turnbull said it was an easy decision to again engage Arrow to build and manage the project.

“We are confident the outcome will be a first class facility built to the highest standard,” said Mr Turnbull.

Arrow Christchurch is delighted to be involved with the project. “At Arrow we thrive on our ability to think outside the square and because this is one of the first such units in the world, there will be plenty of scope for originality,” said Arrow Christchurch manager Tom Clisby.

Arrow will work with teachers and parents of students to ensure the building functions effectively for the variety of disorders.

“Recognising the importance of teamwork has been a major reason for Arrow’s success and continues to be a fundamental element of our culture,” said Mr Clisby. Arrow will also design the building to enable students to be trained in essential life skills. This will require a kitchen, bathroom, IT room and laundry.

Students from throughout Canterbury will use the unit, and as the only one in New Zealand, it may also be utilised by students from around the country.

Arrow International is New Zealand’s largest project and construction management company with an annual turnover of more than $100 million. Arrow Christchurch has completed projects for a number of educational institutions. Among these have been Nayland College in Nelson and Lincoln University near Christchurch. Last year it received the New Zealand Institute of Building Award for Excellence for the development of the Waitaha Learning Centre in Templeton, Christchurch.

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