Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Telecom Switches On Cook Strait Cable


TELECOM SWITCHES ON COOK STRAIT CABLE

Telecom today switched on its new Cook Strait Cable, turning on better and more reliable communications and online services for hundreds of thousands of New Zealanders.

The $30 million cable is one of Telecom’s biggest single investments in infrastructure in recent history.

The Cook Strait Cable is the only telecommunications cable linking the North and South Islands that has been deliberately diverted away from Wellington to avoid earthquake and other risks.

The cable went live when Communications Minister Paul Swain flicked the switch at Horowhenua College, Levin.

A special videoconference, using the cable, linked Horowhenua College and Nelson College for the opening ceremony. The technology came alive for students at both colleges who worked together, via the cable, to create a virtual interactive classroom collaborating on digital and web-based activities.

Simon Moutter, Group General Manager Network, said the 200-kilometre cable was a significant enhancement to the backbone telecommunications network New Zealand needed for a knowledge economy.

The Cook Strait Cable is part of a three stage $38 million project. The second stage is a new cable across the South Island between Greymouth and Christchurch, which is being laid now, and the final stage will be reconfiguring the network.

Mr Moutter said the project was part of Telecom’s ongoing programme to enhance its national network and give Telecom customers access to the best service available in New Zealand.

The Cook Strait Cable has a carrying capacity of up to 3.2 terrabits a second.

“That’s enough to enable everyone in the South Island to watch a separate high quality digital video channel at the same time,” Mr Moutter said. “Or in telephone terms, enough for 15 million simultaneous phone calls.”

“Dependence on our infrastructure is always increasing, particularly with more and more New Zealanders going online for business and home applications,” he said.

“This new cable delivers high quality and huge bandwidth and that means South Island businesses and residential customers will be able to tap into advanced information technologies.”

Telecom's Cook Strait Cable combines with the new Southern Cross Cable to deliver a state of the art robust, high capacity service inside New Zealand, and between New Zealand and the rest of the world.

Mr Moutter said today’s launch illustrated the potential of the new cable, in an educational environment.

“We’ve got two groups of students who have never met before, who are in different parts of the country working together as if they were in the same room thanks to high speed, high bandwidth connections,” he said.

Mr Moutter said switching on the cable marked the completion of an important project in Telecom’s history, and the beginning of even better and more reliable services for customers.

More information on the project can be found at Telecom’s website: http://www2.telecom.co.nz/cable/index.html


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Paymark: Lockdown Equals Slowdown For Some

The three days of lockdown for Auckland earlier this month made a clear impression on our retail spending figures. While only Auckland moved into Level 3 lockdown, the impact was felt across the country, albeit at different levels. Looking at the ... More>>

Infrastructure Commission: Te Waihanga Releases Report On Water Infrastructure

The New Zealand Infrastructure Commission, Te Waihanga’s latest discussion document highlights the importance of current reforms in the water sector. Its State of Play discussion document about water infrastructure is one of a series looking at the ... More>>

Sci-Tech: Perseverance Rover Lands On Mars – Expert Reaction

NASA has landed a car-sized rover on the red planet to search for signs of past life. The vehicle has more instruments than the four rovers preceding it, and it’s also carrying gear that could help pave the way for human exploration of Mars. The ... More>>

ALSO:


ASB: Quarterly Economic Forecast Predicts OCR Hike As Early As August 2022

Predictions of interest rate rises have been brought forward 12 months in ASB’s latest Quarterly Economic Forecast. Chief Economist Nick Tuffley now expects the RBNZ to begin raising the OCR from its current level of 0.25% as early as August ... More>>

ACT: Matariki Almost A Half Billion Dollar Tax On Business

“Official advice to the Government says an extra public holiday at Matariki could cost almost $450 million,” ACT Leader David Seymour can reveal. “This is a perfect example of the Prime Minister doing what’s popular versus what’s responsible. ... More>>

Genesis: Assessing 6,000 GWh Of Renewable Generation Options For Development By 2025

Genesis is assessing 6,000 GWh of renewable generation options for development after starting a closed RFP process with 11 partners. Those invited to participate offer a range of technologies as Genesis continues to execute its Future-gen strategy to ... More>>

OECD: Unemployment Rate Stable At 6.9% In December 2020, 1.7 Percentage Points Higher Than In February 2020

The OECD area unemployment rate was stable at 6.9% in December 2020, remaining 1.7 percentage points above the level observed in February 2020, before the COVID-19 pandemic hit the labour market. [1] In December, the unemployment rate was also stable ... More>>

Stats NZ: Unemployment Drops To 4.9 Percent As Employment Picks Up

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate dropped to 4.9 percent in the December 2020 quarter, from 5.3 percent in the September 2020 quarter, Stats NZ said today. Last quarter’s unemployment rate of 5.3 percent followed the largest increase observed ... More>>