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Whanau

National Radio
60-part series beginning Monday 23 July
Weekdays 11.04 am & 8.55pm


Underlining its commitment to Te Wiki o te Reo Mäori, Mäori Language Week, National Radio is launching its first ever Maori language drama series next Monday.

The sitcom, called Whanau is made up of sixty, two minute episodes and follows the fortunes of the Hitoki whanau. It’s a universal family saga, but also firmly grounded in Te Ao Mäori, the Mäori world.

It will feature on the Kim Hill programme weekday mornings just after the eleven o’clock news.

National Radio’s Programme Development Manager, Elizabeth Alley says Whanau is good, lively radio with a strong storyline and universal appeal. “Hearing the Maori language used really well is a very enriching experience, you can be encouraged to listen to the story for the beauty of the language. It’s a New Zealand story about New Zealanders told in a lively, contemporary way. It’s a big first for us. The way in which the Maori language is now used in such a colloquial way in everyday language convinces us that the time is right for a series like this.”

Whanau was produced by Maaka McGregor and Wiremu Grace for Te Mängai Päho, the organisation which funds Maori language radio and television programmes.

To assist listeners, information about the Whanau series, including script translations and access to audio links will also be added to the Radio New Zealand website www.radionz.co.nz


Whanau on National Radio

Challenging, Informing and Entertaining New Zealand


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